Related categories
Siblings:
19 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. Christa Davis Acampora (2002/2013). Contesting Nietzsche. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 24 (1):1-4.
    Agon as analytic, diagnostic, and antidote -- Contesting Homer: the poiesis of value -- Contesting Socrates: Nietzsche's (artful) naturalism -- Contesting Paul: toward an ethos of agonism -- Contesting Wagner: how one becomes what one is.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Mark Alfano (2013). Nietzsche, Naturalism, and the Tenacity of the Intentional. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (3):457-464.
    In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche demands that “psychology shall be<br>recognized again as the queen of the sciences.” While one might cast a dubious glance at the “again,” many of Nietzsche’s insights were indeed psychological, and many of his arguments invoke psychological premises. In Genealogy, he criticizes the “English psychologists” for the “inherent psychological absurdity” of their theory of the origin of good and bad, pointing out the implausibility of the claim that the utility of unegoistic<br>actions would be forgotten. Tabling (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Robert Burch (2002). Cox, Christoph. Nietzsche: Naturalism and Interpretation. Review of Metaphysics 55 (4):850-852.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Christoph Cox (1995). Nietzsche, Naturalism, and Interpretation. International Studies in Philosophy 27 (3):3-18.
    _Nietzsche: Naturalism and Interpretation_ offers a resolution of one of the most vexing problems in Nietzsche scholarship. As perhaps the most significant predecessor of more recent attempts to formulate a postmetaphysical epistemology and ontology, Nietzsche is considered by many critics to share this problem with his successors: How can an antifoundationalist philosophy avoid vicious relativism and legitimate its claim to provide a platform for the critique of arguments, practices, and institutions? Christoph Cox argues that Nietzsche successfully navigates between relativism and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  5. Ken Gemes & Christopher Janaway (2005). Naturalism and Value in Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):729–740.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Ken Gemes & Christopher Janaway (2005). Review: Naturalism and Value in Nietzsche. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (3):729 - 740.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Marcella Tarozzi Goldsmith (2002). Nietzsche: Naturalism and Interpretation. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):165-172.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Peter S. Groff (2003). Nietzsche: Naturalism and Interpretation (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):100-102.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Béatrice Han-Pile (2009). Transcendental Aspects, Ontological Commitments and Naturalistic Elements in Nietzsche's Thought. Inquiry 52 (2):179 – 214.
    Nietzsche's views on knowledge have been interpreted in at least three incompatible ways - as transcendental, naturalistic or proto-deconstructionist. While the first two share a commitment to the possibility of objective truth, the third reading denies this by highlighting Nietzsche's claims about the necessarily falsifying character of human knowledge (his so-called error theory). This paper examines the ways in which his work can be construed as seeking ways of overcoming the strict opposition between naturalism and transcendental philosophy whilst fully taking (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain (2004). Nietzsche's Positivism. European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):326–368.
    Nietzsche’s favourable comments about science and the senses have recently been taken as evidence of naturalism. Others focus on his falsification thesis: our beliefs are falsifying interpretations of reality. Clark argues that Nietzsche eventually rejects this thesis. This article utilizes the multiple ways of being science friendly in Nietzsche’s context by focussing on Mach’s neutral monism. Mach’s positivism is a natural development of neo-Kantian positions Nietzsche was reacting to. Section 15 of Beyond Good and Evil is crucial to Clark’s interpretation. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain (2004). Reading Nietzsche Through Ernst Mach. In Gregory Moore & Thomas H. Brobjer (eds.), Nietzche and Science. Ashgate
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Lee F. Kerckhove (1994). Re-Thinking Ethical Naturalism: Nietzsche's ?Open Question? Argument. [REVIEW] Man and World 27 (2):149-159.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Imtiaz Moosa (2007). Naturalistic Explanations of Apodictic Moral Claims: Brentano's Ethical Intuitionism and Nietzsche's Naturalism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):159 - 182.
    In this article (1) I extract from Brentano’s works (three) formal arguments against “genealogical explanations” of ethical claims. Such explanation can also be designated as “naturalism” (not his appellation); (2) I counter these arguments, by showing how genealogical explanations of even apodictic moral claims are logically possible (albeit only if certain unlikely, stringent conditions are met); (3) I show how Nietzsche’s ethics meets these stringent conditions, but evolutionary ethics does not. My more general thesis is that naturalism and intuitionism in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Naturalism and Anti-Naturalism in Nietzsche. Archives of the History of Philosophy and of Social Thought 58:213-227.
    Nietzsche has been associated with naturalism due to his arguments that morality, religion, metaphysics, and consciousness are products of natural biological organisms and ultimately natural phenomena. The subject and its mental life are only comprehensible in relation to natural desires, drives, impulses, and instincts. I argue that such typical natu-ralizing tendencies do not exhaust Nietzsche’s project, since they occur in the context of his critique of “nature” and metaphysical, speculative, and scientific naturalisms. Nie-tzsche challenges otherworldly projections of this-worldly beings, as (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Justin Remhof (2015). Overcoming the Conflict of Evolutionary and Naturalized Epistemology in Nietzsche. History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (2):181-194.
    There is a difficulty in understanding Nietzsche’s epistemology. It is generally accepted that he endorses the naturalized epistemological view that knowledge should be closely connected to the sciences. He also holds the evolutionary epistemological position that knowledge has developed exclusively to benefit human survival. Nietzsche’s evolutionary epistemology, however, appears to imply a debunking argument about the truth of our beliefs that seems to undermine his commitment to a naturalized epistemology. This paper argues that Nietzsche’s evolutionary epistemology does not, in fact, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Simon Robertson & Christopher Janaway (eds.) (2012). Nietzsche, Naturalism & Normativity. Oxford University Press.
    This volume comprises ten original essays on Nietzsche, one of the western canon's most controversial ethical thinkers. An international team of experts clarify Nietzsche's own views, both critical and positive, ethical and meta-ethical, and connect his philosophical concerns to contemporary debates in and about ethics, normativity, and value.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Richard Schacht (2012). Nietzsche's Naturalism. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 43 (2):185-212.
    A central thesis of my interpretation of Nietzsche has long been that he fundamentally was a naturalistic thinker, who had a significant philosophical agenda that is best understood accordingly.1 This is a characterization with which many—in the analytically minded part of the philosophical community, at any rate—have come to agree. But there are many kinds of things called "naturalism" in the philosophical literature; and it would be a mistake to suppose that any of them in particular is what Nietzsche espoused (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. C. U. M. Smith (1987). “Clever Beasts Who Invented Knowing”: Nietzsche's Evolutionary Biology of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 2 (1):65-91.
    Nietzsche was a philosopher, not a biologist, Nevertheless his philosophical thought was deeply influenced by ideas emerging from the evolutionary biology of the nineteenth century. His relationship to the Darwinism of his time is difficult to disentangle. It is argued that he was in a sense an unwitting Darwinist. It follows that his philosophical thought is of considerable interest to those concerned to develop an evolutionary biology of mankind. His approach can be likened to that of an extraterrestrial sociobiologist studying (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. James J. Winchester (2000). Nietzsche, Naturalism and Interpretation (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):606-607.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography