Search results for 'Division of labor' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Michael R. Dietrich & Brandi H. Tambasco (2007). Beyond the Boss and the Boys: Women and the Division of Labor in Drosophila Genetics in the United States, 1934-1970. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (3):509 - 528.score: 729.0
    The vast network of Drosophila geneticists spawned by Thomas Hunt Morgan's fly room in the early 20th century has justifiably received a significant amount of scholarly attention. However, most accounts of the history of Drosophila genetics focus heavily on the "boss and the boys," rather than the many other laboratory groups which also included large numbers of women. Using demographic information extracted from the Drosophila Information Service directories from 1934 to 1970, we offer a profile of the gendered division (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Frans Jacobs (2005). Reasonable Partiality in Professional Ethics: The Moral Division of Labour. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):141 - 154.score: 720.0
    Attention is given to a background idea that is often invoked in discussions about reasonable partiality: the idea of a moral division of labour. It is not only a right, but also a duty for professionals to attend (almost) exclusively to the interests of their own clients, because their partial activities are part of an impartial scheme providing for an allocation of professional help to all clients. To clarify that idea, a difference is made between two kinds of (...) of labour, a technical one and a social one. In order to assess the applicability of the idea of a moral division of labour to professional ethics, journalism is contrasted with other professions. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Peter Dickens (1996). Reconstructing Nature: Alienation, Emancipation, and the Division of Labour. Routledge.score: 720.0
    One of the main features of the contemporary environmental crisis is that no one has a clear picture of what is taking place. Environmental problems are real enough but they bring home the inadequacy of our knowledge. How does the natural world relate to the social world? Why do we continue to have such a poor understanding? How can ecological knowledge be made to relate to our understanding of human society? Reconstructing Nature argues that the division of labor (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael Gurven, Jeffrey Winking, Hillard Kaplan, Christopher von Rueden & Lisa McAllister (2009). A Bioeconomic Approach to Marriage and the Sexual Division of Labor. Human Nature 20 (2):151-183.score: 720.0
    Children may be viewed as public goods whereby both parents receive equal genetic benefits yet one parent often invests more heavily than the other. We introduce a microeconomic framework for understanding household investment decisions to address questions concerning conflicts of interest over types and amount of work effort among married men and women. Although gains and costs of marriage may not be spread equally among marriage partners, marriage is still a favorable, efficient outcome under a wide range of conditions. This (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Emmanuel D'hombres (2012). The 'Division of Physiological Labour': The Birth, Life and Death of a Concept. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):3 - 31.score: 708.0
    The notion of the ‘division of physiological labour’ is today an outdated relic in the history of science. This contrasts with the fate of another notion, which was so frequently paired with the division of physiological labour, which is the concept of ‘morphological differentiation.’ This is one of the elementary modal concepts of ontogenesis. In this paper, we intend to target the problems and causes that gradually led biologists to combine these two notions during the 19th century, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Joseph Shieber (2013). Toward a Truly Social Epistemology: Babbage, the Division of Mental Labor, and the Possibility of Socially Distributed Warrant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):266-294.score: 696.0
    In what follows, I appeal to Charles Babbage’s discussion of the division of mental labor to provide evidence that—at least with respect to the social acquisition, storage, retrieval, and transmission of knowledge—epistemologists have, for a broad range of phenomena of crucial importance to actual knowers in their epistemic practices in everyday life, failed adequately to appreciate the significance of socially distributed cognition. If the discussion here is successful, I will have demonstrated that a particular presumption widely held within (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Kevin Hetherington & Rolland Munro (eds.) (1997). Ideas of Difference: Social Spaces and the Labour of Division. Blackwell Publishers/the Sociological Review.score: 666.0
    This book introduces contemporary writing about difference through the idea of the labour of division.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Peter Dietsch (2008). Distributive Lessons From Division of Labour. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (1):96-117.score: 639.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Isidor Wallimann (1981). Estrangement: Marx's Conception of Human Nature and the Division of Labor. Greenwood Press.score: 630.0
  10. Rogier de Langhe (2010). The Division of Labour in Science: The Tradeoff Between Specialisation and Diversity. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):37-51.score: 549.0
    Economics is a typical resource for social epistemology and the division of labour is a common theme for economics. As such it should come as no surprise that the present paper turns to economics to formulate a view on the dynamics of scientific communities, with precursors such as Kitcher (1990), Goldman and Shaked (1991) and Hull (1988). But although the approach is similar to theirs, the view defended is different. Mäki (2005) points out that the lessons philosophers draw from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jeroen Van Bouwel (2005). The Division of Labour in the Social Sciences Versus the Politics of Metaphysics. Questioning Critical Realism's Interdisciplinarity. Graduate Journal of Social Science 2 (2):32-39.score: 549.0
    Some scholars claim that Critical Realism promises well for the unification of the social sciences, e.g., "Unifying social science: A critical realist approach" in this volume. I will first show briefly how Critical Realism might unify social science. Secondly, I focus on the relation between the ontology and methodology of Critical Realism, and unveil the politics of metaphysics. Subsequently, it is argued that the division of labour between social scientific disciplines should not be metaphysics-driven, but rather question-driven. In conclusion, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ulrich Krause & Rainer Hegselmann (2009). Deliberative Exchange, Truth, and Cognitive Division of Labour: A Low-Resolution Modeling Approach. Episteme 6 (2):130-144.score: 540.0
    This paper develops a formal framework to model a process in which the formation of individual opinions is embedded in a deliberative exchange with others. The paper opts for a low-resolution modeling approach and abstracts away from most of the details of the social-epistemic process. Taking a bird's eye view allows us to analyze the chances for the truth to be found and broadly accepted under conditions of cognitive division of labour combined with a social exchange process. Cognitive (...) of labour means that only some individuals are active truth seekers, possibly with different capacities. Both mathematical tools and computer simulations are used to investigate the model. As an analytical result, the Funnel Theorem states that under rather weak conditions on the social process, a consensus on the truth will be reached if all individuals possess an arbitrarily small capacity to go for the truth. The Leading the pack Theorem states that under certain conditions even a single truth seeker may lead all individuals to the truth. Systematic simulations analyze how close agents can get to the truth depending upon the frequency of truth seekers, their capacities as truth seekers, the position of the truth (more to the extreme or more in the centre of an opinion space), and the willingness to take into account the opinions of others when exchanging and updating opinions. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Mathias Thaler (2012). Deep Contextualism and Radical Criticism: The Argument for a Division of Labour in Contemporary Political Theory. In José Maria Castro Caldas & Vítor Neves (eds.), Facts, Values and Objectivity in Economics. Routledge.score: 540.0
    This paper sheds light on the main issue of this book by affording a side look at a discipline other than economics, namely political theory. It is argued that the contemporary debate in political theory hinges on the question of 'realism'. Through a discussion of Raymond Geuss's work, the paper seeks to show that political theory remains caught between the conflicting requirements of deep contextual analysis and radically critical engagement with the world 'as it is'. Finally, the idea of a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jack P. Gibbs (2003). A Formal Restatement of Durkheim's "Division of Labor" Theory. Sociological Theory 21 (2):103-127.score: 540.0
    Despite frequent references in the sociological literature to Durkheim's theory about the division of labor, sociologists have made few attempts to test it. The paucity of attempts and the very debatable outcomes thereof are due largely to Durkheim's use of the traditional discursive mode of theory construction. A discursively stated theory's logical structure is likely to be obscure, and for that reason alone tests of it are difficult and controversial. Rather than perpetuate the exegetical tradition in sociological treatments (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David C. Geary (1998). Sexual Selection, the Division of Labor, and the Evolution of Sex Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):444-447.score: 540.0
    Sexual selection traditionally involves male-male competition and female choice, but in some species, including humans, sexual selection can also involve female-female competition and male choice. The degree to which one aspect of sexual selection or another is manifest in human populations will be influenced by a host of social and ecological variables, including the operational sex ratio. These variables are discussed in connection with the relative contribution of sexual selection and the division of labor to the evolution of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Deng K. Niu, Jia-Kuan Chen & Yong-Ding Liu (2001). Margulis' Theory on Division of Labour in Cells Revisited. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (1).score: 540.0
    Division of labour is a marked feature of multicellular organisms. Margulis proposed that the ancestors of metazoans had only one microtubule organizing center (MTOC), so they could not move and divide simultaneously. Selection for simultaneous movement and cell division had driven the division of labour between cells. However, no evidence or explanation for this assumption was provided. Why could the unicellular ancetors not have multiple MTOCs? The gain and loss of three possible strategies are discussed. It was (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hiroaki Izumi (2014). Local Division of Labor in Rehabilitation Team Conferences. Human Studies:1-38.score: 540.0
    This study investigates rehabilitation team members’ interactive accomplishments of their domains of work and responsibility in rehabilitation team conferences in Japan. A combination of membership categorization analysis and sequential analysis is adopted to systematically illustrate the situated productions of professional sense-making practices. Analysis focuses on the segment in which a physician asks a series of questions regarding a patient’s functional status and disability coded in the functional assessment record (FAR). A close examination of data shows that a physician does not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Michael Weisberg & Ryan Muldoon (2009). Epistemic Landscapes and the Division of Cognitive Labor. Philosophy of Science 76 (2):225-252.score: 531.0
    Because of its complexity, contemporary scientific research is almost always tackled by groups of scientists, each of which works in a different part of a given research domain. We believe that understanding scientific progress thus requires understanding this division of cognitive labor. To this end, we present a novel agent-based model of scientific research in which scientists divide their labor to explore an unknown epistemic landscape. Scientists aim to climb uphill in this landscape, where elevation represents the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Christopher Gauker (1991). Mental Content and the Division of Epistemic Labour. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (September):302-18.score: 531.0
    Tyler Burge's critique of individualistic conceptions of mental content is well known.This paper employs a novel strategy to defend a strong form of Burge's conclusion. The division of epistemic labor rests on the possibility of language-mediated transactions, such as asking for something in a store and getting it. The paper shows that any individualistic conception of content will render such transactions unintelligible.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Fred D'Agostino (2009). From the Organization to the Division of Cognitive Labor. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (1):101-129.score: 525.0
    Discussion of the cognitive division of labor has usually made very little contact with relevant materials from other disciplines, including theoretical biology, management science, and design theory. This article draws on these materials to consider some unavoidable conundrums faced by any attempt to present a particular way of dividing tasks among a labor team as the uniquely rational way of doing this, given the interdependence of the underlying evaluative standards by which the products of a system of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Samuel Scheffler & Véronique Munoz-Dardé (2005). The Division of Moral Labour. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79:229 - 284.score: 525.0
    [Samuel Scheffler] Some egalitarian liberals have proposed a division of moral labour between social institutions and individual agents, but the division-of-labour metaphor has been understood in different ways. This paper aims to disentangle some of these different understandings, with an eye to clarifying the appeal of the egalitarian-liberal project and the challenges that it faces. The idea of a division of moral labour is best understood as the expression of a strategy for accommodating diverse values. It (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Rogier De Langhe (forthcoming). A Unified Model of the Division of Cognitive Labor. .score: 525.0
    Current theories of the division of cognitive labor are confined to the “context of justification,” assuming exogenous theories. But new theories are made from the same labor that is used for developing existing theories, and if none of this labor is ever allocated to create new alternatives, then scientific progress is impossible. A unified model is proposed in which theories are no longer given but a function of the division of labor in the model (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Thomas Porter (2009). The Division of Moral Labour and the Basic Structure Restriction. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (2):173-199.score: 522.0
    Justice makes demands upon us. But these demands, important though they may be, are not the only moral demands that we face. Our lives ought to be responsive to other values too. However, some philosophers have identified an apparent tension between those values and norms, such as justice, that seem to transcend the arena of small-scale interpersonal relations and those that are most at home in precisely that arena. How, then, are we to engage with all of the values and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Luca Ferrero (2010). Decisions, Diachronic Autonomy, and the Division of Deliberative Labor. Philosophers' Imprint 10 (2).score: 522.0
    It is often argued that future-directed decisions are effective at shaping our future conduct because they give rise, at the time of action, to a decisive reason to act as originally decided. In this paper, I argue that standard accounts of decision-based reasons are unsatisfactory. For they focus either on tie-breaking scenarios or cases of self-directed distal manipulation. I argue that future-directed decisions are better understood as tools for the non-manipulative, intrapersonal division of deliberative labor over time. A (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Sandy Goldberg (2011). The Division of Epistemic Labor. Episteme 8 (1):112-125.score: 522.0
    In this paper I formulate the thesis of the Division of Epistemic Labor as a thesis of epistemic dependence, illustrate several ways in which individual subjects are epistemically dependent on one or more of the members of their community in the process of knowledge acquisition, and draw conclusions about the cognitively distributed nature of some knowledge acquisition.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Frank Keil, Early Understanding of the Division of Cognitive Labor.score: 522.0
    Two studies with 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds (N 104) examined whether young children can differentiate expertise in the minds of others. Study 1 revealed that all children in the sample could correctly attribute observable knowledge to familiar experts (i.e., a doctor and a car mechanic). Further, 4- and 5-year-olds could correctly attribute knowledge of underlying scientific principles to the appropriate experts. In contrast, Study 2 demonstrated that 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds have difficulty making attributions of knowledge of scientific principles to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Renzo Carriero & Lorenzo Todesco (2011). Division of Domestic Labour: Do Parents Offer an Example? A Study in Turin. Polis 25 (1):37-64.score: 519.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. James A. Anderson & Jonathan Kimmelman (2014). Are Phase 1 Trials Therapeutic? Risk, Ethics, and Division of Labor. Bioethics 28 (3):138-146.score: 486.0
    Despite their crucial role in the translation of pre-clinical research into new clinical applications, phase 1 trials involving patients continue to prompt ethical debate. At the heart of the controversy is the question of whether risks of administering experimental drugs are therapeutically justified. We suggest that prior attempts to address this question have been muddled, in part because it cannot be answered adequately without first attending to the way labor is divided in managing risk in clinical trials. In what (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Tereza Ximenes (2001). Division of Labor and Resource Management in Eastern Pará, Brazil. Agriculture and Human Values 18 (1):49-56.score: 486.0
    Peasants of the northeastern Pará cultivate cassava (manioc esculenta) using shifting cultivation. This paper discusses some factors in support of cassava production, even though it has some negative environmental impacts. These factors are the importance of cassava in the region's history, dietary traditions, and the cooperative labor systems employed in its cultivation and processing.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Joanna E. Latimer (1997). Older People in Hospital : The Labour of Division, Affirmation and the Stop. In Kevin Hetherington & Rolland Munro (eds.), Ideas of Difference: Social Spaces and the Labour of Division. Blackwell Publishers/the Sociological Review.score: 486.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Rolland Munro (1997). Ideas of Difference : Stability, Social Spaces and the Labour of Division. In Kevin Hetherington & Rolland Munro (eds.), Ideas of Difference: Social Spaces and the Labour of Division. Blackwell Publishers/the Sociological Review.score: 486.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Tony J. Watson (1997). The Labour of Division : The Manager as 'Self' and 'Other'. In Kevin Hetherington & Rolland Munro (eds.), Ideas of Difference: Social Spaces and the Labour of Division. Blackwell Publishers/the Sociological Review.score: 486.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Josh Weisberg (2008). Same Old, Same Old: The Same-Order Representational Theory of Consciousness and the Division of Phenomenal Labor. Synthese 160 (2):161-181.score: 471.0
    The same-order representation theory of consciousness holds that conscious mental states represent both the world and themselves. This complex representational structure is posited in part to avoid a powerful objection to the more traditional higher-order representation theory of consciousness. The objection contends that the higher-order theory fails to account for the intimate relationship that holds between conscious states and our awareness of them--the theory 'divides the phenomenal labor' in an illicit fashion. This 'failure of intimacy' is exposed by the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Robert Boyd & Joseph Henrich, Division of Labor, Economic Specialization, and the Evolution of Social Stratification.score: 470.0
    This paper presents a simple mathematical model that shows how economic inequality between social groups can arise and be maintained even when the only adaptive learning process driving cultural evolution increases individuals’ economic gains. The key assumptions are that human populations are structured into groups and that cultural learning is more likely to occur within than between groups. Then, if groups are sufficiently isolated and there are potential gains from specialization and exchange, stable stratification can sometimes result. This model predicts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Raman Selden (1975). Aesthetics an D Criticism: Against a Division of Labour. British Journal of Aesthetics 15 (1):69-80.score: 468.0
    Every art…needs its own critical organisation, and poetics will form a part of aesthetics as soon as aesthetics becomes the unified criticism of all of the arts instead of whatever it is now.1.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Chiara Cordelli (2011). The Institutional Division of Labor and the Egalitarian Obligations of Nonprofits. Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (2):131-155.score: 459.0
  37. William Tammone (1995). Competition, the Division of Labor, and Darwin's Principle of Divergence. Journal of the History of Biology 28 (1):109 - 131.score: 459.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Norbert Waszek (1983). The Division of Labor. The Owl of Minerva 15 (1):51-75.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Todd Jones (2012). Do Customs Compete with Conditioning? Turf Battles and Division of Labor in Social Explanation. Synthese 184 (3):407-430.score: 459.0
    We often face a bewildering array of different explanations for the same social facts (e.g. biological, psychological, economic, and historical accounts). But we have few guidelines for whether and when we should think of different accounts as competing or compatible. In this paper, I offer some guidelines for understanding when custom or norm accounts do and don’t compete with other types of accounts. I describe two families of non-competing accounts: (1) explanations of different (but similarly described) facts, and (2) accounts (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stjepan G. Meštrovi (1989). The Theme of Civilization and its Discontents in Durkheim's Division of Labor: Philosophical Assumptions and Practical Consequences. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (4):443–456.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mike Hawkins (1996). Durkheim,The Division of Labour, and Social Darwinism. History of European Ideas 22 (1):19-31.score: 459.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Saul A. Kripke (1986). A Problem in the Theory of Reference: The Linguistic Division of Labor and the Social Character of Naming. In Philosophy and Culture, Proceedings of the XVIIth World Congress of Philosophy. Editions Montmorency.score: 459.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. James Bohman (1999). Democracy as Inquiry, Inquiry as Democratic: Pragmatism, Social Science, and the Cognitive Division of Labor. American Journal of Political Science 43 (2):590--607.score: 459.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sue M. Bowden (1989). Spinners and Weavers of Auffay. Rural Industry and the Sexual Division of Labour in a French Village, 1750–1850. History of European Ideas 10 (2):253-254.score: 459.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Williamson M. Evers (1980). Specialization and the Division of Labor in the Social Thought of Plato and Rousseau. Journal of Libertarian Studies 4 (1):45-64.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. J. H. Fewell, Shana K. Schmidt & Thomas Taylor (2009). Division of Labor in the Context of Complexity. In Juergen Gadau & Jennifer Fewell (eds.), Organization of Insect Societies: From Genome to Sociocomplexity. Harvard.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Padraic Monaghan & Stefan Pollmann (2003). Division of Labor Between the Hemispheres for Complex but Not Simple Tasks: An Implemented Connectionist Model. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (3):379.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Wendy Olsen (2007). Stereotypical and Traditional Views About the Gender Division of Labour in Indian Labour Markets. Journal of Critical Realism 4 (1).score: 459.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Green Revolution (1993). Division of Labour 113, 174-5 Dutch Green Party See Groenen Earth First! 71 Ecocentrism 5, 34, 54, 85, 233 Ecocycles 121-2, 135-8. [REVIEW] In Andrew Dobson & Paul Lucardie (eds.), The Politics of Nature: Explorations in Green Political Theory. Routledge. 107--135.score: 459.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Frank C. Keil, Courtney Stein, Lisa Webb, Van Dyke Billings & Leonid Rozenblit (2008). Discerning the Division of Cognitive Labor: An Emerging Understanding of How Knowledge Is Clustered in Other Minds. Cognitive Science 32 (2):259-300.score: 453.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999