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  1. Jaak Panksepp (2013). Cross-Species Neuroaffective Parsing of Primal Emotional Desires and Aversions in Mammals. Emotion Review 5 (3):235-240.
    The primal motivational systems of all mammals are constituted of the evolved affective brain networks that gauge key survival issues. However, since progress in functional neuroscience has historically lagged behind conceptual developments in psychological science, motivational processes have traditionally been anchored to behavioral rather than neural and affective issues. Attempts to retrofit neuroaffective issues onto established psychological-conceptual structures are problematic, especially when fundamental evidence for primal affective circuits, and their neural nature, comes largely from animal research. This article provides a (...)
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  2. Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran (2012). Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind (Jaak Panksepp) 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience (Rami Gabriel) 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self (Stephen Asma and Tom Greif) 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law (Glennon Curran and Rami Gabriel).
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  3. Jaak Panksepp & Mark Solms (2012). What is Neuropsychoanalysis? Clinically Relevant Studies of the Minded Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):6-8.
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  4. Jaak Panksepp & Douglas Watt (2011). What is Basic About Basic Emotions? Lasting Lessons From Affective Neuroscience. Emotion Review 3 (4):387-396.
    A cross-species affective neuroscience strategy for understanding the primary-process (basic) emotions is defended. The need for analyzing the brain and mind in terms of evolutionary stratification of functions into at least primary (instinctual), secondary (learned), and tertiary (thought-related) processes is advanced. When viewed in this context, the contentious battles between basic-emotion theorists and dimensional-constructivist approaches can be seen to be largely nonsubstantial differences among investigators working at different levels of analysis.
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  5. Jaak Panksepp (2009). The Neuroevolutionary and Neuroaffective Psychobiology of the Prosocial Brain. In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oup Oxford.
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  6. Jaak Panksepp & Georg Northoff (2009). The Trans-Species Core SELF: The Emergence of Active Cultural and Neuro-Ecological Agents Through Self-Related Processing Within Subcortical-Cortical Midline Networks. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):193–215.
  7. Marie Vandekerckhove & Jaak Panksepp (2009). The Flow of Anoetic to Noetic and Autonoetic Consciousness: A Vision of Unknowing (Anoetic) and Knowing (Noetic) Consciousness in the Remembrance of Things Past and Imagined Futures. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):1018-1028.
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  8. Georg Northoff & Jaak Panksepp (2008). The Trans-Species Concept of Self and the Subcortical–Cortical Midline System. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (7):259-264.
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  9. Jaak Panksepp (2008). Carving "Natural" Emotions: "Kindly" From Bottom-Up but Not Top-Down. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):395-422.
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  10. Jaak Panksepp (2007). Affective Consciouness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. 114--129.
  11. Jaak Panksepp (2007). Affective Neuroscience and the Ancestral Sources of Human Feelings. In Henri Cohen & Brigitte Stemmer (eds.), Consciousness and Cognition: Fragments of Mind and Brain. Elxevier Academic Press.
     
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  12. Jaak Panksepp (2007). Criteria for Basic Emotions: Is DISGUST a Primary “Emotion”? Cognition and Emotion 21 (8):1819-1828.
  13. Jaak Panksepp (2007). Emotional Feelings Originate Below the Neocortex: Toward a Neurobiology of the Soul. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):101-103.
    Disregard of primary-process consciousness is endemic in mind science. Most neuroscientists subscribe to ruthless reductionism whereby mental qualities are discarded in preference for neuronal functions. Such ideas often lead to envisioning other animals, and all too often other humans, as unfeeling zombies. Merker correctly highlights how the roots of consciousness exist in ancient neural territories we share, remarkably homologously, with all the other vertebrates. (Published Online May 1 2007).
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  14. Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Abella Garcia & Adam Lesiak (2007). Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:32.
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  15. Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Garcia & Adam Lesiak (2007). Does Any Aspect of Mind Survive Brain Damage That Typically Leads to a Persistent Vegetative State? Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):32-.
    Recent neuroscientific evidence brings into question the conclusion that all aspects of consciousness are gone in patients who have descended into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Here we summarize the evidence from human brain imaging as well as neurological damage in animals and humans suggesting that some form of consciousness can survive brain damage that commonly causes PVS. We also raise the issue that neuroscientific evidence indicates that raw emotional feelings (primary-process affects) can exist without any cognitive awareness of those (...)
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  16. Michael Beaton, J. Bricklin, Louis C. Charland, JCW Edwards, Ilya B. Farber, Bill Faw, Rocco J. Gennaro, C. Kaernbach, C. M. H. Nunn, Jaak Panksepp, Jesse J. Prinz, Matthew Ratcliffe, Jacob J. Ross, S. Murray, Henry P. Stapp & Douglas F. Watt (2006). Switched-on Consciousness - Clarifying What It Means - Response to de Quincey. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (4):7-12.
     
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  17. Jaak Panksepp (2006). Are Emotions More Than Learned Behaviors? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):96-97.
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  18. Jaak Panksepp (2006). The Affective Neuroeconomics of Social Brains: One Man's Cruelty is Another's Suffering. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):234-235.
    Cruelty does not emerge from a single emotional system of the brain. Its many cognitive aspects are intermeshed inextricably with the nature of negative affects ranging from fear to suffering. The rewards of cruelty may be counteracted by a variety of neurochemical factors as well as novel social policies.
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  19. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Affective Consciousness: Core Emotional Feelings in Animals and Humans. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):30-80.
  20. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Commentary on "Becoming Aware of Feelings": On the Primal Nature of Affective Consciousness: What Are the Relations Between Emotional Awareness and Affective Experience? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 7 (1):40-55.
  21. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Emotional Dynamics of the Organism and its Parts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):212-213.
    Emotion-science without basic brain-science is only superficially satisfying. Dynamic systems approaches to emotions presently provide a compelling metaphor that raises more difficult empirical questions than substantive scientific answers. How might we close the gap between theory and empirical observations? Such theoretical views still need to be guided by linear cross-species experimental approaches more easily implement in the laboratory.
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  22. Jaak Panksepp (2005). On the Embodied Neural Nature of Core Emotional Affects. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (8-10):158-184.
  23. Jaak Panksepp (2005). On the Neuro-Evolutionary Nature of Social Pain, Support, and Empathy. In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.
  24. Jaak Panksepp (2005). Toward a Science of Ultimate Concern. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):22-29.
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  25. Jaak Panksepp & Joseph R. Moskal (2005). Loving Opioids in the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):361-362.
    Brain opioids regulate social emotions in several distinct ways. The abundance of neuroscientific detail in the target article helps familiarize the uninitiated with the true and humbling complexities of mammalian brains, but little of it translates to research strategies, with robust predictions, at the human level. Only global neurochemical affective state variables derived from animal research have clear implications for human research.
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  26. Terrence Deak & Jaak Panksepp (2004). Stress, Sleep, and Sexuality in Psychiatric Disorders. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. 111.
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  27. Jaak Panksepp (2004). Biological Psychiatry Sketched—Past, Present, and Future. In , Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. 1.
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  28. Jaak Panksepp (2004). Emerging Neuroscience of Fear and Anxiety: Therapeutic Practice and Clinical Implications. In , Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. 489.
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  29. Jaak Panksepp (2004). Free Will and the Varieties of Affective and Conative Selves. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):671-672.
    A causally efficacious conscious will is a small part of our everyday activities, but a part that deserves to be recognized, studied, and cherished, perhaps as a fundamental, emotion- and conation-related, right hemispheric neuronal process. Such brain functions might be less in doubt if we consider all the pieces of the larger pie, especially those where our passions and desires reside.
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  30. Jaak Panksepp (ed.) (2004). Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss.
    In this landmark volume, editor Jaak Panksepp assembles the perspectives of top scientists and clinicians who apply contemporary neuroscience to psychiatric ...
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  31. Jaak Panksepp & Joseph Moskal (2004). Schizophrenia: The Elusive Disease. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):863-864.
    All mammals have social brains, and there is presently no evidence that humans have relatively more genetically dictated social brain circuitry than other species. The postulation that schizophrenia arises from disruption of brains systems uniquely devoted to social traits is obviated not only by the large number of anatomical and biochemical brain differences, but also by nonsocial symptoms of schizophrenic disorders.
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  32. Bradley S. Peterson & Jaak Panksepp (2004). Biological Basis of Childhood Neuropsychiatric Disorders. In Jaak Panksepp (ed.), Textbook of Biological Psychiatry. Wiley-Liss. 393.
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  33. D. Schutter, J. van Honk & Jaak Panksepp (2004). Introducing Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and its Property of Causal Inference in Investigating Brain-Function Relationships. Synthese 141 (2):155-73.
    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a method capable of transiently modulating neural excitability. Depending on the stimulation parameters information processing in the brain can be either enhanced or disrupted. This way the contribution of different brain areas involved in mental processes can be studied, allowing a functional decomposition of cognitive behavior both in the temporal and spatial domain, hence providing a functional resolution of brain/mind processes. The aim of the present paper is to argue that TMS with its ability to (...)
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  34. Dennis J. L. G. Schutter, Jack Van Honk & Jaak Panksepp (2004). Introducing Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Its Property of Causal Inference in Investigating Brain-Function Relationships. Synthese 141 (2):155 - 173.
    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a method capable of transiently modulating neural excitability. Depending on the stimulation parameters information processing in the brain can be either enhanced or disrupted. This way the contribution of different brain areas involved in mental processes can be studied, allowing a functional decomposition of cognitive behavior both in the temporal and spatial domain, hence providing a functional resolution of brain/mind processes. The aim of the present paper is to argue that TMS with its ability to (...)
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  35. Jaak Panksepp (2003). Damasio's Error? Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):111-134.
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  36. Jaak Panksepp (2003). Review Article: &Quot;looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain" by A. Damasio. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):111-134.
  37. Jaak Panksepp (2002). On the Animalian Values of the Human Spirit: The Foundational Role of Affect in Psychotherapy and the Evolution of Consciousness. European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health 5 (3):225-245.
  38. Jaak Panksepp & Marcia Smith Pasqualini (2002). “Mindscoping” Pain and Suffering. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):468-469.
    No adequate evidence exists for the evolution of facial pain expression and detection mechanisms, as opposed to social-learning processes. Although brain affective/emotional processes, and resulting whole body action patterns, have surely evolved, we should also aspire to monitor human suffering by direct neural measures rather than by more indirect indices.
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  39. Jaak Panksepp (2001). Jarvilehto's Seductive Ideas: Provocative Concepts Without Data? Consciousness and Emotion. Special Issue 2 (1):157-171.
    Introductory Note: This commentary developed out of an informal discussion of Part I (2000) of Jarvilehto?s two-part Consciousness & Emotion series with Ralph Ellis at the recent Amsterdam Symposium on Feelings and Emotions (June 13?16, 2001). Part II of Jarvilehto?s series appears in the present issue. Ellis asked me to share my critical concerns with Jarvilehto?s Part I in this commentary, with an advance copy supplied to Jarvilehto, who will reply in the next issue of Consciousness & Emotion. I think (...)
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  40. Jaak Panksepp, Nakia Gordon & Jeff Burgdorf (2001). Empathy and the Action-Perception Resonances of Basic Socio-Emotional Systems of the Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):43-44.
    Mammalian brains contain a variety of self-centered socio-emotional systems. An understanding of how they interact with more recent cognitive structures may be essential for understanding empathy. Preston & de Waal have neglected this vast territory of proximal brain issues in their analysis.
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  41. Jaak Panksepp (2000). Affective Consciousness and the Instinctual Motor System: The Neural Sources of Sadness and Joy. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization - an Anthology. Advances in Consciousness Research. John Benjamins. 27-54.
  42. Jaak Panksepp (2000). Neural Behaviorism: From Brain Evolution to Human Emotion at the Speed of an Action Potential. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):212-213.
    Rolls shares important data on hunger, thirst, sexuality, and learned behaviors, but is it pertinent to understanding the fundamental nature of emotionality? Important as such work is for understanding the motivated behaviors of animals, Rolls builds a constructivist theory of emotions and primary-process affective consciousness without considering past evidence on specific types of emotional tendencies and their diverse neural substrates.
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  43. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Cradle of Consciousness: A Periconscious Emotional Homunculus? Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):24-32.
  44. Jaak Panksepp (2000). “The Dream of Reason Creates Monsters” . . . Especially When We Neglect the Role of Emotions in Rem-States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):988-990.
    As highlighted by Solms, and to a lesser extent by Hobson et al. and Nielsen, dreaming and REM sleep can be dissociated. Meanwhile Vertes & Eastman and Revonsuo provide distinct views on the functions of REM sleep and dreaming. A resolution of such divergent views may clarify the fundamental nature of these processes. As dream commentators have long noted, with Revonsuo taking the lead among the present authors, emotionality is a central and consistent aspect of REM dreams. A deeper consideration (...)
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  45. Jaak Panksepp (2000). The Neuro-Evolutionary Cusp Between Emotions and Cognitions: Implications for Understanding Consciousness and the Emergence of a Unified Mind Science. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):15-54.
    The neurobiological systems that mediate the basic emotions are beginning to be understood. They appear to be constituted of genetically coded, but experientially refined executive circuits situated in subcortical areas of the brain which can coordinate the behavioral, physiological and psychological processes that need to be recruited to cope with a variety of primal survival needs (i.e., they signal evolutionary fitness issues). These birthrights allow newborn organisms to begin navigating the complexities of the world and to learn about the values (...)
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  46. Jaak Panksepp (1999). The Affiliative Playfulness and Impulsivity of Extraverts May Not Be Dopaminergically Mediated. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):533-534.
    A major dopaminergic role for extraversion is compromised by the fact that affiliation and impulsivity tend to be reduced by psychostimulants. Also, the large clinical literature on the treatment of ADHD with drugs that promote dopamine activity provides little or no support for a major role for dopamine in human extraversion. Dopamine facilitation of agency may be more evident for inanimate rather than animate rewards.
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  47. Jaak Panksepp & Jeffrey Burgdorf (1999). Laughing Rats? Playful Tickling Arouses High Frequency Ultrasonic Chirping in Young Rodents. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & David J. Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii. Mit Press. 231--244.
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  48. Jaak Panksepp (1998). The Periconscious Substrates of Consciousness: Affective States and the Evolutionary Origins of the SELF. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (5-6):5-6.
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  49. Jaak Panksepp, Brian Knutson & Laura Bird (1995). On the Brain and Personality Substrates of Psychopathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):568-570.
    Further understanding at neuroscientific and personality levels should considerably advance our ability to deal with individuals that have strong sociopathic tendencies. An analysis of neurodynamic responses to emotional stimuli will eventually be able to detect sociopathic tendencies of the brain. Such information could be used to enhance the options available to individuals at risk without limiting their personal freedoms.
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  50. Jaak Panksepp (1990). Gray Zones at the Emotion/Cognition Interface: A Commentary. Cognition and Emotion 4 (3):289-302.
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