Search results for 'Susan Allison' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Allen Wood, Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2007). Debating Allison on Transcendental Idealism. Kantian Review 12 (2):1-39.score: 120.0
  2. H. Allison, A. Aspect, P. Grangier, G. Roger & S. Auyang (2009). Abraham, R. And Marsden, J.(1978), Foundations of Mechanics, New York/Reading, MA: Benjamin Cummings. Allison, H.(1994),“Causality and Causal Laws in Kant. A Critique of Michael Friedman”, In: P. Parrini (Ed.), Kant and Contemporary Epistemology, Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Kluwer. [REVIEW] In P. Kerszberg, J. Petitot & M. Bitbol (eds.), Constituting Objectivity. Transcendental Perspectives on Modern Physics. 515.score: 120.0
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  3. Paul Guyer & Henry E. Allison (2006). Dialogue: Paul Guyer and Henry Allison on Allison's Kant's Theory of Taste. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
  4. Henry E. Allison (1990). Kant's Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In his new book the eminent Kant scholar Henry Allison provides an innovative and comprehensive interpretation of Kant's concept of freedom. The author analyzes the concept and discusses the role it plays in Kant's moral philosophy and psychology. He also considers in full detail the critical literature on the subject from Kant's own time to the present day. In the first part Professor Allison argues that at the center of the Critique of Pure Reason there is the foundation (...)
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  5. Henry E. Allison (2001). Kant's Theory of Taste: A Reading of the Critique of Aesthetic Judgment. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This book constitutes one of the most important contributions to recent Kant scholarship. In it, one of the pre-eminent interpreters of Kant, Henry Allison, offers a comprehensive, systematic, and philosophically astute account of all aspects of Kant's views on aesthetics. The first part of the book analyses Kant's conception of reflective judgment and its connections with both empirical knowledge and judgments of taste. The second and third parts treat two questions that Allison insists must be kept distinct: the (...)
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  6. Henry E. Allison (1996). Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant's Theoretical and Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant (Kant's Transcendental Idealism, 1983, and Kant's Theory of Freedom, 1990), and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. (...)
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  7. Henry E. Allison (2011). Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals: A Commentary. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Henry E. Allison presents a comprehensive commentary on Kant's Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals (1785). It differs from most recent commentaries in paying special attention to the structure of the work, the historical context in which it was written, and the views to which Kant was responding. Allison argues that, despite its relative brevity, the Groundwork is the single most important work in modern moral philosophy and that its significance lies mainly in two closely related factors. The (...)
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  8. Marianne Allison (1986). A Literature Review of Approaches to the Professionalism of Journalists. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (2):5 – 19.score: 60.0
    This literature review of professionalism was prepared by San Jose State University graduate student Marianne Allison as a research committee project of the Mass Communication and Society Division, Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The project was prepared under the guidance of Professor Diana Stover Tillinghast. It reviews the literature on two approaches to professionalism in general and of the professionalism of journalists in particular: the ?structural?functionalist approach?; and the ?power approach.?; Traditional and recent discussions of the (...)
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  9. Lyn Allison & Leslie Cannold (2012). Previous AHOYs in Support of Ron. Australian Humanist, The (107):3.score: 60.0
    Allison, Lyn; Cannold, Leslie It is great to see such a good turnout for this important occasion and I congratulate the Humanist Society again on this award. It really makes a difference to people's lives: when they get the award, when they know about it, when there is publicity for the person concerned. It is an all-round good thing to do and I congratulate you for it.
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  10. Henry E. Allison (2012). Essays on Kant. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This volume presents seventeen essays by one of the world's leading scholars on Kant. Henry E. Allison explores the nature of transcendental idealism, freedom of the will, and the concept of the purposiveness of nature. He places Kant's views in their historical context and explores their contemporary relevance to present day philosophers.
     
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  11. Henry E. Allison (2000). Where Have All the Categories Gone? Reflections on Longuenesse's Reading of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Inquiry 43 (1):67 – 80.score: 30.0
    This paper contains a critical analysis of the interpretation of Kant's second edition version of the Transcendental Deduction offered by Béatrice Longuenesse in her recent book: Kant and the Capacity to Judge. Though agreeing with much of Longuenesse's analysis of the logical function of judgment, I question the way in which she tends to assign them the objectifying role traditionally given to the categories. More particularly, by way of defending my own interpretation of the Deduction against some of her criticisms, (...)
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  12. Henry E. Allison (1973). Kant's Critique of Berkeley. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1).score: 30.0
  13. Henry E. Allison (1976). The Non-Spatiality of Things in Themselves for Kant. Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):313-321.score: 30.0
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  14. Henry E. Allison (1986). Morality and Freedom: Kant's Reciprocity Thesis. Philosophical Review 95 (3):393-425.score: 30.0
  15. Henry E. Allison (2007). Comments on Guyer. Inquiry 50 (5):480 – 488.score: 30.0
    Guyer argues for four major theses. First, in his early, pre-critical discussions of morality, Kant advocated a version of rational egoism, in which freedom, understood naturalistically as a freedom from domination by both one's own inclinations and from other people, rather than happiness, is the fundamental value. From this point of view, the function of the moral law is to prescribe rules best suited to the preservation and maximization of such freedom, just as on the traditional eudaemonistic account it is (...)
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  16. Henry E. Allison (2001). Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's "Kant's Ethical Thought&Quot;. [REVIEW] Ethics 111 (3):594-613.score: 30.0
  17. Henry E. Allison (2003). Reply to the Comments of Longuenesse and Ginsborg. Inquiry 46 (2):182 – 194.score: 30.0
    In this discussion I respond to some of the criticisms raised by Béatrice Longuenesse and Hannah Ginsborg to my account of Kant's aesthetic theory presents in Kant's Theory of Taste.
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  18. Henry E. Allison (1984). Incongruence and Ideality. Topoi 3 (2):169-175.score: 30.0
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  19. Susan Babbitt (2003). Book Review: Martine Watson Brown Ley and Allison B. Kimmich. Women and Autobiography. Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):215-218.score: 24.0
  20. Nilly Mor, Leah D. Doane, Emma K. Adam, Susan Mineka, Richard E. Zinbarg, James W. Griffith, Michelle G. Craske, Allison Waters & Maria Nazarian (2010). Within-Person Variations in Self-Focused Attention and Negative Affect in Depression and Anxiety: A Diary Study. Cognition and Emotion 24 (1):48-62.score: 24.0
  21. Cornelis de Waal (2007). Susan Haack a Complete Bibliography. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 21.0
    In this volume comprised of sixteen essays and rebuttals, author and professor of philosophy Susan Haack responds to her fellow philosophers and her critics on a wide range of topics that involve much more than the esoteric nature of contemporary philosophy. Instead, as is Haack's forte, she asserts her views on important current issues such as how scientists conduct their work, the ethics of affirmative action and the pitfalls of preferential hiring, and how the distorted reality the postmodern thinkers (...)
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  22. Christine E. Gudorf (2004). Feminism and Postmodernism in Susan Frank Parsons. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):519 - 543.score: 18.0
    Reviewing "The Ethics of Gender, Feminism and Christian Ethics," and "The Cambridge Companion to Feminist Theology," the author suggests that Susan Parsons responds to questions postmodernism has posed to both feminism and Christian ethics by using insights gained from various accounts of the moral subject found in feminist philosophy, ethics, and theology. Hesitant to embrace postmodernism's critique of the possibility of ethics, Parsons redefines ethics by establishing a moral point of view within discursive communities. Yet in her brief treatment (...)
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  23. Susan Hurley (2001). Luck and Equality: Susan Hurley. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):51–72.score: 15.0
    [Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether it (...)
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  24. James Cargile (1996). Evidence and Inquiry by Susan Haack. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (3):621-625.score: 15.0
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  25. Max Black (1981). Philosophy of Logics By Susan Haack Cambridge University Press, 1978, Xvi + 276 Pp., £13.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 56 (217):435-.score: 15.0
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  26. Susan E. Bernick (1992). Philosophy and Feminism: The Case of Susan Bordo. Hypatia 7 (3):188 - 196.score: 15.0
    In this paper I lay out what I take to be the crucial insights in Susan Bordo's "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy" and point out some additional difficulties with the skeptical position. I call attention to an ambiguity in the nature or content of the "maleness" of philosophy that Bordo identifies. Finally, I point out that, unlike some feminist skeptics, Bordo never loses sight in her work of women's lived experiences.
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  27. Béatrice Longuenesse (2003). Kant's Theory of Judgment, and Judgments of Taste: On Henry Allison's "Kant's Theory of Taste&Quot;. [REVIEW] Inquiry 46 (2):143 – 163.score: 12.0
    Kant's use of the leading thread of his table of logical forms of judgment to analyze judgments of taste yields more results than Allison's account allows. It reveals in judgments of taste the combination of two judgments: a descriptive judgment about the object, and a normative judgment about the judging subjects. Core arguments of Kant's critique of taste receive new light from this analysis.
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  28. Béatrice Longuenesse (2000). Kant's Categories and the Capacity to Judge: Responses to Henry Allison and Sally Sedgwick. Inquiry 43 (1):91 – 110.score: 12.0
    In response to Henry Allison's and Sally Sedwick's comments on my recent book, Kant and the Capacity to Judge, I explain Kant's description of the understanding as being essentially a "capacity to judge", and his view of the relationship between the categories and the logical functions of judgment. I defend my interpretation of Kant's argument in the Transcendental Deduction of the Categories in the B edition. I conclude that, in my interpretation, Kant's notions of the "a priori" and the (...)
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  29. Nikolay Milkov (2003). Susan Stebbing's Criticism of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 10:351-63.score: 12.0
    Susan Stebbing’s paper “Logical Positivism and Analysis” (March 1933) was unusually critical of Wittgenstein. It put up a sharp opposition between Cambridge analytic philosophy of Moore and Russell and the positivist philosophy of the Vienna Circle to which she included Wittgenstein from 1929–32. Above all, positivists were interested in analyzing language, analytic philosophers in analyzing facts. Moreover, whereas analytic philosophers were engaged in directional analysis which seeks to illuminate the multiplicity of the analyzed facts, positivists aimed at final analysis (...)
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  30. Lior Nitzan (2010). The Thought of an Object and the Object of Thought: A Critique of Henry E. Allison's 'Two Aspect' View. Archiv für Geschichte Der Philosophie 92 (2):176-198.score: 12.0
    In this paper I take issue with Allison's ‘two aspect’ view of Kant's transcendental distinction between appearances and things-in-themselves. Unlike those of Allison's critics, who criticize him, and by implication Kant, based on some form of the ‘two world’ view, I argue that, even Allison's methodological, more moderate interpretation, nevertheless includes an excessive commitment to the role of things-in-themselves in Kant's theoretical philosophy, a commitment which is both unnecessary and incompatible with Kant's text. I offer an alternative (...)
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  31. Simon Derpmann (2012). Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why It Matters. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):421-422.score: 12.0
    Susan Wolf, Meaning in Life and Why it Matters Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s10677-011-9321-8 Authors Simon Derpmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Philosophisches Seminar, Domplatz 23, 48143 Münster, Germany Journal Ethical Theory and Moral Practice Online ISSN 1572-8447 Print ISSN 1386-2820.
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  32. Axel Cleeremans & Erik Myin (1999). A Short Review of Consciousness in Action by Susan Hurley. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:455-458.score: 12.0
    Consider Susan Hurley's depiction of mainstream views of the mind: "The mind is a kind of sandwich, and cognition is the filling" (p. 401). This particular sandwich (with perception as the bottom loaf and action as the top loaf) tastes foul to Hurley, who devotes most of "Consciousness in Action" to a systematic and sometimes extraordinarily detailed critique of what has otherwise been dubbed "classical" models of the mind. This critique then provides the basis for her alternative proposal, in (...)
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  33. H. G. Callaway (2000). Review: Susan Haack, Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate, Unfashionable Essays. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 53 (3):407-414.score: 12.0
    Susan Haack presents a striking and appealing figure in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy. In spite of British birth and education, she appears to bridge the gap between analytic philosophy and American pragmatism, with its more diverse influences and sources. Well known for her writings in the philosophy of logic and epistemology, she fuses something of the hard-headed debunking style of a Bertrand Russell with a lively interest in Peirce, James and Dewey.
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  34. Stephen Engstrom (1993). Allison on Rational Agency. Inquiry 36 (4):405 – 418.score: 12.0
    In his very rich and insightful book, Kant's Theory of Freedom, Henry Allison argues that in the first Critique Kant's reason for rejecting Humean compatibilism in favor of an incompatibilist conception of practical freedom stems, not from a specific concern to ground morality, as many have supposed, but from his general conception of rational agency, which Allison explicates in terms of the idea of practical spontaneity. Practically spontaneous rational agency is subject to imperatives and therefore distinct from Humean (...)
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  35. Jill Vance Buroker (1984). Incongruence and the Unity of Transcendental Idealism: Reply to Allison. Topoi 3 (2):177-180.score: 12.0
    This article responds to henry allison's criticisms of the author's claim that kant's incongruent counterparts argument supports his critical conclusions that things in themselves must be both non-Spatial and unknowable. The first part of the article treats four objections allison raises. The second part discusses differences between allison's and the author's readings of kant's claims about things in themselves.
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  36. Susan Haack (2000). Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate. University of Chicago Press.score: 12.0
    Forthright and wryly humorous, philosopher Susan Haack deploys her penetrating analytic skills on some of the most highly charged cultural and social debates of recent years. Relativism, multiculturalism, feminism, affirmative action, pragmatisms old and new, science, literature, the future of the academy and of philosophy itself—all come under her keen scrutiny in Manifesto of a Passionate Moderate.
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  37. Kenneth R. Westphal (2001). Freedom and the Distinction Between Phenomena and Noumena: Is Allison's View Methodological, Metaphysical, or Equivocal? Journal of Philosophical Research 26:593-622.score: 12.0
    Henry Allison [1983; cf. 1990, 1996] criticizes and rejects naturalism because the idea of freedom is constitutive of rational spontaneity, which alone enables and entitles us to judge or to act rationally, and only transcendental idealism can justify our acting under the idea of freedom. Allison’s critique of naturalism is unclear because his reasons for claiming that free rational spontaneity requires transcendental idealism are inadequate and because his characterization of Kant’s idealism is ambiguous. Recognizing this reinforces the importance (...)
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  38. Susan Wendell (1994). No Longer Patient: Feminist Ethics and Health Care Susan Sherwin Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992, Xi + 286 Pp., US$39.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 33 (04):783-.score: 12.0
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  39. Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.) (2009). Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. OUP USA.score: 12.0
    The late Susan Moller Okin was a leading political theorist whose scholarship integrated political philosophy and issues of gender, the family, and culture. Okin argued that liberalism, properly understood as a theory opposed to social hierarchies and supportive of individual freedom and equality, provided the tools for criticizing the substantial and systematic inequalities between men and women. Her thought was deeply informed by a feminist view that theories of justice must apply equally to women as men, and she was (...)
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  40. Peter King, A Note on Susan James.score: 12.0
    Susan James, in her recent work Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy (Oxford: Clarendon 1997), prefaces her investigation of emotions in the seventeenth century with a series of remarks about the earlier career of the emotions, in particular their treatment in the Middle Ages. In brief, she takes the ‘new’ analyses of the passions put forward in the seventeenth century to be a philosophical sideshow to the main event: the dethronement of Aristotelian natural philosophy and metaphysics (22). (...)
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  41. Anthony Chemero & William Cordeiro, "Dynamical, Ecological Sub-Persons" Commentary on Susan HurleyÂ's Consciousness in Action.score: 12.0
    In a way that is rarely even attempted, and even more rarely actually pulled off, Susan Hurley, in her book Consciousness in Action, brings scientific ideas into contact with mainstream philosophy. It is not at all unusual for empirical results from cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience to be raised in discussion of issues in philosophy of science and philosophy of mind--Dennett and the Churchlands, for example, have been doing so for years. But Hurley attempts to draw empirical results even (...)
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  42. Susan Haack (2007). Of Chopin and Sycamores : Response to Ryszard Wójcicki. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books.score: 12.0
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  43. Dieter Schönecker (2012). Once Again: What is the 'First Proposition'in Kant's Groundwork? Some Refinements, a New Proposal, and a Reply to Henry Allison. Kantian Review 17 (2):281-296.score: 12.0
    Discussing the concept of duty in Groundwork 1, Kant refers to a ‘second proposition’ and a ‘third proposition’, the latter being a ‘Folgerung aus beiden vorigen’. However, Kant does not identify what the ‘first proposition’ is. In this paper, I will argue that the first proposition is this: An action from duty is an action from respect for the moral law. I defend this claim against a critique put forward by Allison according to which ‘respect’ is a concept that (...)
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  44. Mas'ud Zavarzadeh (1985). A Stragegy of Containment: Center and Margin in Desperately Seeking Susan. Telos 1985 (65):136-143.score: 12.0
    In her film, Desperately Seeking Susan, Susan Seidelman continues her inquiry into the relations between the “center” and the “margin” in contemporary culture. The ideology of the film represents the center — the status quo — as the site for mature negotiations of communal values, whereas it constructs the margin — the locus of opposition — as an instance of self-indulgence, transgression, and extremity. This is the same theme in her first film, Smithereens. This fascination with the tension (...)
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  45. David H. Guston (1994). Congressmen and Scientists in the Making of Science Policy: The Allison Commission, 1884–1886. [REVIEW] Minerva 32 (1):25-52.score: 12.0
    The Allison Commission focused attention on the administration of the scientific bureaux and its relation to the jurisdictional system in the Congress. The commission also had a more considerable influence on congressional policy towards the scientific bureaux than was previously thought. Legislative recommendations offered by the Allison Commission became law, even if they avoided the notice of congressional opponents through the strategic manipulation of the appropriations process. Hilary Herbert was not a crude enemy of science, but a staunch (...)
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  46. Susan& Sheridan Magarey (2002). Susan," Local, Global, Regional: Women's Studies in Australia. Feminist Studies 28:1.score: 12.0
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  47. Susan Dodds (2002). Susan Dodds' Reply. Monash Bioethics Review 21 (3).score: 12.0
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  48. Ross K. Elfline (2014). The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association Ed. By Susan Ball (Review). Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):110-115.score: 12.0
    For many of us, our relationship with the College Art Association (CAA) centers around the organization's annual meeting, that cacophonous yearly ritual that sees job applicants, panelists, and old friends and colleagues descend upon a convention hotel for one long weekend in February. The recent publication The Eye, the Hand, the Mind: 100 Years of the College Art Association, edited by former CAA executive director Susan Ball, attempts to historicize not only this event but the entire range of the (...)
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  49. James L. Olive (2007). Youth and Sexualities: Pleasure, Subversion, and Insubordination In and Out of Schools. Edited by Mary Louise Rasmussen, Eric Rofes, and Susan Talburt. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. 250 Pp. $75.00 (Hardcover), $24.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Educational Studies 41 (1):88-92.score: 12.0
    (2007). Youth and Sexualities: Pleasure, Subversion, and Insubordination In and Out of Schools. Edited by Mary Louise Rasmussen, Eric Rofes, and Susan Talburt. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. 250 pp. $75.00 (hardcover), $24.95 (paper) Educational Studies: Vol. 41, No. 1, pp. 88-92.
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  50. Christina Pareigis (2010). Letter From Susan Taubes to Jacob Taubes April 4, 1952. Telos 2010 (150):111-114.score: 12.0
    Foreword This letter is part of a correspondence belonging to the estate of Susan Taubes. It documents the private and intellectual relations between her and Jacob Taubes, whom she married in 1949. The two spent most of the period until 1952 geographically separated from each other, a situation due to their changing work and study circumstances. Susan spent the first half of 1952 in Paris, preparing her dissertation at the Sorbonne; Jacob took up Gershom Scholem's invitation to teach (...)
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