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Susan James [94]Simon P. James [29]S. James [10]Scott M. James [8]
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Susan James
Birkbeck College
Sarah James
Brock University
3 more
  1. Passion and Action: The Emotions in Seventeenth-Century Philosophy.Susan James - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Passion and Action is an exploration of the role of the passions in seventeenth-century thought. Susan James offers fresh readings of a broad range of thinkers, including such canonical figures as Hobbes, Descartes, Malebranche, Spinoza, Pascal, and Locke, and shows that a full understanding of their philosophies must take account of their interpretations of our affective life. This ground-breaking study throws new light upon the shaping of our ideas about the mind, knowledge, and action, and provides a historical context for (...)
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  2.  90
    An Introduction to Evolutionary Ethics.Scott M. James - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Offering the first general introductory text to this subject, the timely _Introduction to_ _Evolutionary Ethics_ reflects the most up-to-date research and current issues being debated in both psychology and philosophy. The book presents students to the areas of cognitive psychology, normative ethics, and metaethics. The first general introduction to evolutionary ethics Provides a comprehensive survey of work in three distinct areas of research: cognitive psychology, normative ethics, and metaethics Presents the most up-to-date research available in both psychology and philosophy Written (...)
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  3.  58
    Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion, and Politics: The Theologico-Political Treatise.Susan James - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    Susan James explores the revolutionary political thought of one of the most radical and creative of modern philosophers, Baruch Spinoza. His Theologico-Political Treatise of 1670 defends religious pluralism, political republicanism, and intellectual freedom. James shows how this work played a crucial role in the development of modern society.
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  4.  74
    Epistemic and Non-Epistemic Theories of Remembering.Steven James - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly:109-127.
    Contemporary memory sciences describe processes that are dynamic and constructive. This has led some philosophers to weaken the relationship between memory and epistemology; though remembering can give rise to epistemic success, it is not itself an epistemic success state. I argue that non-epistemic theories will not do; they provide neither necessary nor sufficient conditions for remembering that p. I also argue that the shortcomings of the causal theory are epistemic in nature. Consequently, a theory of remembering must account for both (...)
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  5. Beyond Equality and Difference: Citizenship, Feminist Politics and Female Subjectivity.Gisela Bock & Susan James (eds.) - 1992 - Routledge.
    Historically, as well as more recently, women's emancipation has been seen in two ways: sometimes as the `right to be equal' and sometimes as the `right to be different'. These views have often overlapped and interacted: in a variety of guises they have played an important role in both the development of ideas about women and feminism, and the works of political thinkers by no means primarily concerned with women's liberation. The chapters of this book deal primarily with the meaning (...)
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  6.  46
    The Content of Social Explanation.Susan James - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of the central questions of explanation in the social sciences, and a defence of 'holism' against 'individualism'. In the first half of the book Susan James sets out very clearly the philosophical background to this controversy. She locates its source not at the analytical level at which most of the debate is usually conducted but at a more fundamental, moral level, in different conceptions of the human individual. In the second half of the book she examines (...)
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  7.  15
    Spinoza: Thoughts on Hope in Our Political Present.Moira Gatens, Justin Steinberg, Aurelia Armstrong, Susan James & Martin Saar - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory.
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  8. Buddhism, Virtue and Environment.David E. Cooper & Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (1):138-140.
     
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  9. The Philosophical Innovations of Margaret Cavendish.Susan James - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):219 – 244.
  10. I—Susan James: Creating Rational Understanding: Spinoza as a Social Epistemologist.Susan James - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):181-199.
    Does Spinoza present philosophy as the preserve of an elite, while condemning the uneducated to a false though palliative form of ‘true religion’? Some commentators have thought so, but this contribution aims to show that they are mistaken. The form of religious life that Spinoza recommends creates the political and epistemological conditions for a gradual transition to philosophical understanding, so that true religion and philosophy are in practice inseparable.
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  11. Feminism in Philosophy of Mind: The Question of Personal Identity.Susan James - 2000 - In Miranda Fricker & Jennifer Hornsby (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Feminism in Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 29--45.
  12. The Presence of Nature: A Study in Phenomenology and Environmental Philosophy.Simon P. James - 2009 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  13.  40
    Narrative as the Means to Freedom: Spinoza on the Uses of Imagination.Susan James - 2010 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed & Michael A. Rosenthal (eds.), Spinoza's 'Theological-Political Treatise': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 250.
  14.  7
    Why Old Things Matter.Simon P. James - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (3):313-329.
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  15. Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics.Simon P. James - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (2):281-283.
     
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  16.  40
    Ecosystem Services and the Value of Places.Simon James - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (1):101-113.
    In the US Environmental Protection Agency, the World Wide Fund for Nature and many other environmental organisations, it is standard practice to evaluate particular woods, wetlands and other such places on the basis of the ‘ecosystem services’ they are thought to provide. I argue that this practice cannot account for one important way in which places are of value to human beings. When they play integral roles in our lives, particular places have a kind of value which cannot be adequately (...)
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  17.  5
    The Interplay of Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Political Activity in Emerging Markets: The Role of Strategic Flexibility in Non‐Market Strategies.Rifat Kamasak, Simon R. James & Meltem Yavuz - 2019 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (3):305-320.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  18. Evolution and the Possibility of Moral Realism. [REVIEW]Peter Carruthers & Scott M. James - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):237-244.
    A commentary on Richard Joyce's The Evolution of Morality.
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  19.  5
    Why Old Things Matter.Simon James - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4).
    It is, I suggest, unclear whether any old inanimate objects deserve to be treated with respect simply because they are old. Yet this does not entail that an object’s age has no bearing at all on the question of how it may permissibly be treated. I defend the claim that those who fail to take seriously the histories of old inanimate objects typically deserve to be criticized on aretaic grounds. Such people, I argue, tend to lack the virtue of humility.
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  20.  14
    Why Old Things Matter.Simon James - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):313-329.
    It is, I suggest, unclear whether any old inanimate objects deserve to be treated with respect simply because they are old. Yet this does not entail that an object’s age has no bearing at all on the question of how it may permissibly be treated. I defend the claim that those who fail to take seriously the histories of old inanimate objects typically deserve to be criticized on aretaic grounds. Such people, I argue, tend to lack the virtue of humility.
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  21.  13
    J.G.A. Pocock and the Idea of the ‘Cambridge School’ in the History of Political Thought.Samuel James - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (1):83-98.
    ABSTRACTThis article offers a reinterpretation of the origins and character of the so-called ‘Cambridge School’ in the history of political thought by reconstructing the intellectual background to J.G.A. Pocock's 1962 essay ‘The History of Political Thought: A Methodological Enquiry’, typically regarded as the first statement of a ‘Cambridge’ approach. I argue that neither linguistic philosophy nor the celebrated work of Peter Laslett exerted a major influence on Pocock's work between 1948 and 1962. Instead, I emphasise the importance of Pocock's interest (...)
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  22.  10
    Democracy and the Good Life in Spinoza's Philosophy.Susan James - 2008 - In Charles Huenemann (ed.), Interpreting Spinoza: Critical Essays. Cambridge University Press.
  23. Sympathy and Comparison : Two Principles of Human Nature.Susan James - 2005 - In Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Impressions of Hume. Oxford University Press. pp. 61--107.
  24.  33
    Protecting Nature for the Sake of Human Beings.Simon P. James - 2016 - Ratio 29 (2):213-227.
    It is often assumed that to say that nature should be protected for the sake of human beings just is to say that it should be protected because it is a means to one or more anthropocentric ends. I argue that this assumption is false. In some contexts, claims that a particular natural X should be protected for our sakes mean that X should be protected, not because it is a means to anthropocentric ends, but because it is part of (...)
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  25.  19
    The Affective Cost of Philosophical Self-Transformation.Susan James - forthcoming - Intellectual History Review.
    It is not uncommon for early-modern philosophers to portray a perfectly philosophical way of life as a condition that approaches the divine. The philosopher becomes as like God as a human being can, and in doing so experiences unparalleled and unalloyed joy. Spinoza advocates a version of this view and defends it with impressive consistency. To suggest that the process of philosophical enlightenment involves any affective cost, he argues, is simply to display a lack of understanding, and thus to fall (...)
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  26.  5
    Supporting Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy: Difficulties, Disconnections, and Disarray.Lin Perry, Steven James, Robyn Gallagher, Janet Dunbabin, Katharine Steinbeck & Julia Lowe - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (4):719-724.
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  27.  18
    Finding - and Failing to Find - Meaning in Nature.Simon P. James - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (5):609-625.
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  28.  81
    Assuring Adequate Protections in International Health Research: A Principled Justification and Practical Recommendations for the Role of Community Oversight.D. Buchanan, S. Sifunda, N. Naidoo, S. James & P. Reddy - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (3):246-257.
    The analysis presented here lays out the ethical warrants for requiring community oversight of health research conducted in international settings. It reviews the inadequacies with the current standards of individual informed consent and research ethics committee review, and then, shows how a broader population-based public health perspective raises new demands on justice involving due consideration of the rights, harms and benefits to the community as a whole. As developed here, an ethical standard that requires community oversight of health research is (...)
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  29.  15
    Identifying Psychophysiological Indices of Expert Vs. Novice Performance in Deadly Force Judgment and Decision Making.Robin R. Johnson, Bradly T. Stone, Carrie M. Miranda, Bryan Vila, Lois James, Stephen M. James, Roberto F. Rubio & Chris Berka - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  30.  98
    The Caveman's Conscience: Evolution and Moral Realism.Scott M. James - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):215-233.
    An increasingly popular moral argument has it that the story of human evolution shows that we can explain the human disposition to make moral judgments without relying on a realm of moral facts. Such facts can thus be dispensed with. But this argument is a threat to moral realism only if there is no realist position that can explain, in the context of human evolution, the relationship between our particular moral sense and a realm of moral facts. I sketch a (...)
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  31. When Helping the Victim Matters More Than Helping a Victim.Scott M. James - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (1):32-45.
    Consequentialists insist there is no rational basis for distinguishing between determinate victims and indeterminate victims. Whether it's a child drowning at our feet or needy communities abroad, our reason to help is the same. Experimental data indicate, however, that we regularly make such distinctions. In this article, I show that there are indeed persuasive normative grounds for preserving this distinction. When potential beneficiaries are determinate, they have a special claim on us grounded in fairness. I present several cases that demonstrate (...)
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  32.  39
    Freedom, Slavery and the Passions.Susan James - 2009 - In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 223--241.
    Book synopsis: Since its publication in 1677, Spinoza’s Ethics has fascinated philosophers, novelists, and scientists alike. It is undoubtedly one of the most exciting and contested works of Western philosophy. Written in an austere, geometrical fashion, the work teaches us how we should live, ending with an ethics in which the only thing good in itself is understanding. Spinoza argues that only that which hinders us from understanding is bad and shows that those endowed with a human mind should devote (...)
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  33. Reconciling International Human Rights and Cultural Relativism: The Case of Female Circumcision.St Ephen A. James - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (1):1–26.
  34. The Passions in Metaphysics and the Theory of Action'.Susan James - 1998 - In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--913.
     
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  35. Rights as Enforceable Claims.Susan James - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (2):133–147.
    Unless rights are claimable, it is sometimes argued, they are no more than rhetorical gestures which mock the poor and needy. But what makes a right claimable? If rights are to avoid the charge of emptiness, I argue, they must be effectively enforceable. But what does this involve? I identify three conditions of enforceability, and four sets of broader circumstances in which these conditions can be met. I discuss the implications of this analysis of rights for multicultural societies, and conclude (...)
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  36.  32
    Why Should We Read Spinoza?Susan James - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:109-125.
    Historians of philosophy are well aware of the limitations of what Butterfield called ‘Whig history’: narratives of historical progress that culminate in an enlightened present. Yet many recent studies retain a somewhat teleological outlook. Why should this be so? To explain it, I propose, we need to take account of the emotional investments that guide our interest in the philosophical past, and the role they play in shaping what we understand as the history of philosophy. As far as I know, (...)
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  37.  55
    Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women.Stanlie M. James & Abena P. A. Busia (eds.) - 1993 - Routledge.
    Theorizing Black Feminisms outlines some of the crucial debates going on among Black feminists today. In doing so it brings together a collection of some of the most exciting work by Black women scholars. The book encompasses a wide range of diverse subjects and refuses to be limited by notions of disciplinary boundaries or divisions between theory and practice. Theorizing Black Feminisms combines essays on literature, sociology, history, political science, anthropology, and art. As such it will be vital reading for (...)
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  38.  7
    Philosophy and Methodology in the Social Sciences.Susan James - 1978 - History and Theory 17 (3):336.
  39. Recruiting and Educating Participants for Enrollment in HIV-Vaccine Research: Ethical Implications of the Results of an Empirical Investigation.S. Sifunda, P. Reddy, N. Naidoo, S. James & D. Buchanan - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (1):78-85.
    The study reports on the results of an empirical investigation of the education and recruitment processes used in HIV vaccine trials conducted in South Africa. Interviews were conducted with 21 key informants involved in HIV vaccine research in South Africa and three focus groups of community advisory board members. Data analysis identified seven major themes on the relationship between education and recruitment: the process of recruitment, the combined dual role of educators and recruiters, conflicts perceived by field staff, pressure to (...)
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  40.  16
    The Trouble with Environmental Values.Simon P. James - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (2):131-144.
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  41.  89
    Power and Difference: Spinoza's Conception of Freedom.Susan James - 1996 - Journal of Political Philosophy 4 (3):207–228.
  42.  13
    The Content of Social Explanation.Russell Keat & Susan James - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (2):283.
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  43.  33
    Human Virtues and Natural Values.Simon P. James - 2006 - Environmental Ethics 28 (4):339-353.
    In several works, Holmes Rolston, III has argued that a satisfactory environmental ethic cannot be built on a virtue ethical foundation. His first argument amounts to the charge that because virtue ethics is by nature “self-centered” or egoistic, it is also inherently “human-centered” and hence ill suited to treating environmental matters. According to his second argument, virtue ethics is perniciously human-centeredsince it “locates” the value of a thing, not in the thing itself, but in the agent who is “ennobled” by (...)
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  44.  6
    VII-Rights as Enforceable Claims.Susan James - 2003 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 103 (1):133-147.
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  45.  15
    Negotiating Public and Professional Interests: A Rhetorical Analysis of the Debate Concerning the Regulation of Midwifery in Ontario, Canada. [REVIEW]Philippa Spoel & Susan James - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (3):167-186.
    This article investigates the uneasy process of integrating midwifery’s alternative, women-centered model of childbirth care within the medically-dominated healthcare system in Canada. It analyses the impure processes of rhetorical identification and differentiation that characterized the debate about how to regulate midwifery in Ontario by examining a selection of submissions from diverse health care groups with vested interest in the debate’s outcome. In divergent ways, these groups strategically appeal to the value of the “public interest” in order to advance professional concerns. (...)
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  46.  79
    Merleau‐Ponty, Metaphysical Realism and the Natural World1.Simon P. James - 2007 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):501 – 519.
    Environmental thinkers often suppose that the natural world (or some parts of it, at least) exists in its own right, independent of human concerns. The arguments developed in this paper suggest that it is possible to do justice to this thought without endorsing some form of metaphysical realism. Thus the early sections look to Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception to develop an anti-realist account of the independent reality of the natural world, one, it is argued, that has certain advantages over the (...)
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  47.  1
    Young People with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences of Diabetes Management and Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy.Lin Perry, Steven James, Katharine Steinbeck, Janet Dunbabin & Julia Lowe - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (3):554-561.
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  48.  30
    Against Holism:Rethinking Buddhist Environmental Ethics.Simon P. James - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (4):447-461.
    Environmental thinkers sympathetic to Buddhism sometimes reason as follows: (1) A holistic view of the world, according to which humans are regarded as being 'one' with nature, will necessarily engender environmental concern; (2) the Buddhist teaching of 'emptiness' represents such a view; therefore (3) Buddhism is an environmentally-friendly religion. In this paper, I argue that the first premise of this argument is false (a holistic view of the world can be reconciled with a markedly eco-unfriendly attitude) as is the second (...)
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  49.  61
    Good Samaritans, Good Humanitarians.Scott M. James - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):238–254.
    Duties of beneficence are not well understood. Peter Singer has argued that the scope of beneficence should not be restricted to those who are, in some sense, near us. According to Singer, refusing to contribute to humanitarian relief efforts is just as wrong as refusing to rescue a child drowning before you. Most people do not seem convinced by Singer’s arguments, yet no one has offered a plausible justification for restricting the scope of beneficence that doesn’t produce counterintuitive results elsewhere. (...)
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  50.  19
    “Nothing Truly Wild is Unclean”: Muir, Misanthropy, and the Aesthetics of Dirt.Simon P. James - 2014 - Environmental Ethics 36 (3):357-363.
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