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  1. Michael Austin (2011). The Inner Life of Objects: Immanent Realism and Speculative Philosophy. Analecta Hermeneutica 3:1-12.
    Often a division of concepts can help us better understand unknown or seldom charted philosophical terrain: historically, the distinctions and differences between idealism and materialism have proven helpful, but with Quentin Meillassoux‟s concept of correlationism, the divisions between realism and anti realismwhich once seemed clean-cut are now harder to understand. Graham Harman has gone a step further than Meillassoux‟s initial definition of correlationism, by which “we mean the idea according to which we only ever have access to the correlation between (...)
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  2. Michael Austin (2010). To Exist is to Change: A Friendly Disagreement with Graham Harman About Why Things Happen. Speculations 1 (1):66-83.
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  3. Bryan E. Bannon (2015). Levi R. Bryant, Onto-Cartography: An Ontology of Machines and Media. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2.
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  4. Tom Beckett & Graham Harman (2011). Interview with Graham Harman. Ask/Tell.
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  5. Jeffrey Bell (2015). Steven Shaviro, The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2.
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  6. Jane Bennett (2012). Systems and Things: A Response to Graham Harman and Timothy Morton. New Literary History 43 (2):225-233.
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  7. Liza Blake (2013). A Recipe for Disaster: Response to Julian Yates. In Eileen A. Joy, Anna Klosowska, Nicola Masciandro & Michael O'Rourke (eds.), Speculative Medievalisms: Discography. punctum books.
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  8. Terence Blake, MORE SPECULATIVE REALISM: Article Review of Graham Harman's BELLS AND WHISTLES.
    Graham Harman judges science and common sense in terms of the crude philosophical criteria of another age and finds them lacking in knowledge of reality. He posits a shadowy "withdrawn" realm of real objects in order to explain the discrepancies between his naive abstract model of knowledge as access and the concrete reality of the sciences. Works such as THE QUADRUPLE OBJECT, THE THIRD TABLE and BELLS AND WHISTLES, like the whole of his philosophy, are the record of Harman noticing (...)
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  9. Ian Bogost (2012). Alien Phenomenology or, What It's Like to Be a Thing. University of Minnesota Press.
    Examines the author's idea of object-oriented philosophy, wherein things, and how they interact with one another, are the center of philosophical interest.
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  10. Ian Bogost (2007). Perusasive Games: The Expressive Power of Videogames. MIT Press.
    An exploration of the way videogames mount arguments and make expressive statements about the world that analyzes their unique persuasive power in terms of ...
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  11. Ian Bogost (2006). Unit Operations: An Approach to Videogame Criticism. MIT Press.
    A critical approach that marries literary theory and information technology, reading digital and cultural artifacts—whether videogames, literature, or ...
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  12. Paul Boshears (2013). "Against Paraphrase" Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Interstitial 1 (March):1-4.
    A review of Graham Harman's book, Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy.
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  13. Ray Brassier, Iain Hamilton Grant, Graham Harman & Quentin Meillassoux (2007). Speculative Realism. Collapse:306-449.
  14. Svenja Bromberg (2013). The Anti-Political Aesthetics of Objects and Worlds Beyond. Mute (25 July).
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  15. Nathan Brown (2013). THE NADIR OF OOO: FROM GRAHAM HARMAN's TOOLBEING TO TIMOTHY MORTON's REALIST MAGIC: OBJECTS, ONTOLOGY, CAUSALITY. Parrhesia (17):62-71.
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  16. Levi R. Bryamt (2013). Politics and Speculative Realism. Speculations (IV):15-21.
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  17. Levi R. Bryant (2014). The Time of the Object: Derrida, Luhmann, and the Processual Nature of Substance. In Roland Faber & Andrew Goffey (eds.), The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy. Bloomsbury. 71-91.
  18. Levi R. Bryant (2014). Black. In Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (ed.), Prismatic Ecology: Ecotheory Beyond Green. University of Minnesota Press. 290-310.
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  19. Levi R. Bryant (2013). The Gravity of Things: An Introduction to Onto-Cartography. Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies (ADCS) 2013 (2).
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  20. Levi R. Bryant (2012). Posthuman Technologies. Umbr(A) 1:25-41.
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  21. Levi R. Bryant (2012). Substantial Powers, Active Affects: The Intentionality of Objects. Deleuze Studies 6 (4):529-543.
    What can Dungeons & Dragons teach us about the being of beings? This article argues that Dungeons & Dragons introduces us to a world composed of objects or entities, where the being of objects is defined not by their qualities, but rather by their powers, capacities or affects. Drawing on the thought of Spinoza, Deleuze and Molnar, objects are seen to be defined by what they can do or their capacities to act, such that qualities are effects of these acts. (...)
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  22. Levi R. Bryant (2012). The Other Face of God: Lacan, Theological Structure, and the Accursed Remainder. Speculations:69-98.
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  23. Levi R. Bryant (2011). A Logic of Multiplicities: Deleuze, Immanence, and Onticology. Analecta Hermeneutica 3:1-20.
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  24. Levi R. Bryant (2011). Wilderness Ontology. In Celina Jeffrey (ed.), Preternatural. punctum books.
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  25. Levi R. Bryant (2011). The Democracy of Objects. Open Humanities Press.
    Since Kant, philosophy has been obsessed with epistemological questions pertaining to the relationship between mind and world and human access to objects. In The Democracy of Objects Bryant proposes that we break with this tradition and once again initiate the project of ontology as first philosophy. Drawing on the object-oriented ontology of Graham Harman, as well as the thought Roy Bhaskar, Gilles Deleuze, Niklas Luhman, Aristotle, Jacques Lacan, Bruno Latour and the developmental systems theorists, Bryant develops a realist ontology that (...)
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  26. Levi R. Bryant (2011). Of Parts and Politics: Onticology and Queer Politics. Identities 16:13-28.
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  27. Levi R. Bryant (2011). On the Reality and Construction of Hyperobjects with Reference to Class. Speculations:86-103.
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  28. Levi R. Bryant (2011). The Ontic Principle: Outline of an Object-Oriented Ontology. In Levi R. Bryant, Nick Srnicek & Graham Harman (eds.), The Speculative Turn: Continental Materialism and Realism. re.press.
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  29. Levi R. Bryant (2009). Review of David Couzens Hoy, The Time of Our Lives: A Critical History of Temporality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  30. Levi R. Bryant (2009). Deleuze's Transcendental Empiricism: Notes Towards a Transcendental Materialism. In Edward Willatt & Matt Lee (eds.), Thinking Between Deleuze and Kant: A Strange Encounter. Continuum.
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  31. Levi R. Bryant (2008). Difference and Givenness: Deleuze's Transcendental Empiricism and the Ontology of Immanence. Northwestern University Press.
    From one end of his philosophical work to the other, Gilles Deleuze consistently described his position as a transcendental empiricism. But just what is transcendental about Deleuze’s transcendental empiricism? And how does his position fit with the traditional empiricism articulated by Hume? In Difference and Givenness , Levi Bryant addresses these long-neglected questions so critical to an understanding of Deleuze’s thinking. Through a close examination of Deleuze’s independent work--focusing especially on Difference and Repetition-- as well as his engagement with thinkers (...)
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  32. Levi R. Bryant (2008). Žižek's New Universe of Discourse: Politics and the Discourse of the Capitalist. International Journal of Žižek Studies 2 (4).
    This paper argues that the thought of Lacan and Žižek are to be distinguished at the level of the formal structure of discourse. Although Žižek often situates his own theoretical project in terms of the discourse of the analyst, his work occupies an uneasy place in this position insofar as the discourse of the analyst is directed at the singularity of the subject’s symptom, rather than shared political causes. Drawing on his “Milan Discourse” where Lacan presents the discourse of the (...)
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  33. Levi R. Bryant (2003). Review: A Lacanian Epesteme? [REVIEW] Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 36:121-128.
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  34. Joseph Camlin, illustrated ontology.
    How can a form of philosophy successfully turn from language and still retain the cohesion demanded of this discipline?
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  35. Joseph Camlin, Object-Oriented Ontogenesis: Biosentience and Being.
    If objects can centrally organize ontology, what chance do they have at centrally organizing ontogenesis? The questions in this article aspire to these ends by navigating a sequence of examples in the neurosciences with an oppositional reading that clashes head-on with a wildly speculative scientism.
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  36. John D. Caputo (2012). Continental Philosophy of Religion: Then, Now, and the Tomorrow. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):347-360.
  37. Patricia Clough (2013). Three Notes, Three Questions: Response to Graham Harman. In Eileen A. Joy, Anna Klosowska, Nicola Masciandro & Michael O'Rourke (eds.), Speculative Medievalisms: Discography. punctum books.
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  38. Jon Cogburn & Mark Allan Ohm (2014). Actual Qualities of Imaginative Things: Notes Towards an Object-Oriented Literary Theory. Speculations:180-224.
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  39. Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (2013). Sublunary. In Eileen A. Joy, Anna Klosowska, Nicola Masciandro & Michael O'Rourke (eds.), Speculative Medievalisms: Discography. punctum books.
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  40. Andrew Cole (2013). The Call of Things: A Critique of Object-Oriented Ontologies. The Minnesota Review 2013 (80):106-118.
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  41. Claire Colebrook (2014). Not Kant, Not Now. Speculations:127-157.
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  42. Nathan Coombs (2010). Nomological Disputation: Alain Badiou and Graham Harman on Objects. Speculations 1 (1):145-152.
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  43. Clayton Crockett (2012). Quentin Meillassoux: After Finitude: An Essay on the Necessity of Contingency, Trans. Ray Brassier. London and New York: Continuum, 2008, $27.95 (Hb); $19.95 (Pb). Graham Harman, Quentin Meillassoux: Philosophy in the Making, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011, Viii and 247 Pp. $110.00 (Hb); $32.00 (Pb). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (3):251-255.
    Quentin Meillassoux: After finitude: an essay on the necessity of contingency, trans. Ray Brassier. London and New York: Continuum, 2008, 27.95 ( hb );19.95 (pb). Graham Harman, Quentin Meillassoux: Philosophy in the making, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2011, viii and 247 pp. 110.00 ( hb );32.00 (pb). Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11153-012-9341-x Authors Clayton Crockett, University of Central Arkansas, 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway, AR 72035, USA Journal International Journal for Philosophy of Religion Online ISSN (...)
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  44. Drew Daniel (2013). Lynx-Eyed Aristotle: Response to Kellie Robertson. In Eileen A. Joy, Anna Klosowska, Nicola Masciandro & Michael O'Rourke (eds.), Speculative Medievalisms: Discography. punctum books.
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  45. Brian Davis & Graham Harman, On Landscape Ontology: An Interview with Graham Harman.
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  46. Paloma García Díaz (2011). Object-Oriented Philosophy and the Comprehension of Scientific Realities. Athenea Digital 11 (1):225-238.
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  47. Paul Ennis (2011). Copernican Metaphysics. Continent 1 (2):94-101.
    In the Kritik der reinen Vernunft (1781) Kant introduced the transcendental method on a precarious footing and he never shied away from the fact that the transcendental method is structured, and I mean it in the most direct sense possible, aporetically. The aporetic element, the unstable core within Kantian thought, is the distinction between phenomenal and noumenal content in the chapter entitled "On the ground of the distinction [Unterscheidung] of all objects [Gegenstände] in general into phenomena and noumena" (Kant A236/B295-A260/B315). (...)
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  48. Paul Ennis (2011). Continental Realism. Zero Books.
    In Continental Realism Paul Ennis tackles the rise of realist metaphysics in contemporary continental philosophy. Pitted against the dominant antirealist and transcendental continental hegemony Ennis argues that continental thinking must establish an alliance between metaphysics, speculation, and realism if we are to truly get back to the things themselves.
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  49. Paul Ennis (ed.) (2010). Post-Continental Voices: Selected Interviews. Zero Books.
    This collection of interviews brings together seven post-continental thinkers to discuss their own personal academic development, their experiences of graduate school and their hopes for post-continental philosophy. Each thinker has been chosen for their importance, popularity and potential. Opening with a short introduction this book offers a rare insight into the world of academic philosophy from the inside. Acting as a handbook to post-continental philosophy this book will prepare students for the unique challenges facing academic philosophy in the coming years. (...)
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  50. Roland Faber (2014). Touch: A Philosophic Meditation. In Roland Faber & Andrew Goffey (eds.), The Allure of Things: Process and Object in Contemporary Philosophy. Bloomsbury. 47-67.
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