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  1. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (1982). Arts and Ends. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (2):215-217.
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  2. A. Berleant (1978). Aesthetic Paradigms for an Urban Ecology. Diogenes 26 (103):1-28.
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  3. William L. Blizek (1973). "Aesthetics: An Introduction," by George Dickie. The Modern Schoolman 50 (4):385-387.
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  4. Brian Bruya, Aesthetic Spontaneity: A Theory of Action Based on Affective Responsiveness.
  5. Brian Bruya (2003). Li Zehou's Aesthetics as a Marxist Philosophy of Freedom. Dialogue and Universalism 13 (11-12):133-140.
    After being largely unknown to non-siniphone philosophers, Li Zehou's ideas are gradually being translated into English, but very little has been done on his aesthetics, which he says is the key to his oeuvre. In the first of three sections of this paper, I briefly introduce the reader to Kant's aesthetics through Li's eyes, in which he develops an implicit notion of aesthetic freedom as political vehicle through the notions of subjectivity, universalization, and the unity of the cognitive faculties. In (...)
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  6. Brian Bruya (2002). Chaos as the Inchoate: The Early Chinese Aesthetic of Spontaneity. In Grazia Marchianò (ed.), Aesthetics & Chaos: Investigating a Creative Complicity.
    Can we conceive of disorder in a positive sense? We organize our desks, we discipline our children, we govern our polities--all with the aim of reducing disorder, of temporarily reversing the entropy that inevitably asserts itself in our lives. Going all the way back to Hesiod, we see chaos as a cosmogonic state of utter confusion inevitably reigned in by laws of regularity, in a transition from fearful unpredictability to calm stability. In contrast to a similar early Chinese notion of (...)
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  7. Noel Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) (2011). Narrative, Emotion, and Insight. Penn state university.
    While narrative has been one of the liveliest and most productive areas of research in literary theory, discussions of the nature of emotional responses to art and of the cognitive value of art tend to concentrate almost exclusively on the problem of fiction: How can we emote over or learn from fictions? Narrative, Emotion, and Insight explores what would happen if aestheticians framed the matter differently, having narratives—rather than fictional characters and events—as the object of emotional and cognitive attention. The (...)
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  8. Clive Cazeaux (2012). Sensation as Participation in Visual Art. Aesthetic Pathways 2 (2):2-30.
    Can an understanding be formed of how sensory experience might be presented or manipulated in visual art in order to promote a relational concept of the senses, in opposition to the customary, capitalist notion of sensation as a private possession, as a sensory impression that is mine? I ask the question in the light of recent visual art theory and practice which pursue relational, ecological ambitions. As Arnold Berleant, Nicolas Bourriaud, and Grant Kester see it, ecological ambition and artistic form (...)
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  9. Thomas Richard Fahy (ed.) (2010). The Philosophy of Horror. University Press of Kentucky.
    Inviting readers to ponder this genre's various manifestations since the late 1700s, this collection of probing essays allows fans and philosophy buffs alike to ...
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  10. Elisa Galgut (2009). Tragedy and Reparation. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The Kleinian psychoanalyst Hanna Segal argues for the reparative nature of art, and especially of the genre of classical tragedy. According to Kleinian theory, healthy psychological development requires that early infantile aggressive and destructive emotions are worked through; such “working through” is necessary for the development of conscience, for feelings of empathy, as well as for cognitive development. It is also a necessary condition for creative activity. Segal examines the roots of the impulse to create by looking specifically at the (...)
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  11. Peter Gena (2012). Apropos Sonification: A Broad View of Data as Music and Sound. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (2):197-205.
    Numbers have been identified with symbolic data forever. The profound association of both with acoustics, music, and sonic art from Pythagoras to current work is beyond reproach. Recently, sonification looks for ways to realize symbolic data (representing results or measurements) as well as “raw” data (signals, impulses, images, etc.) into compositions. In the strictest sense, everything in a computer is symbolic, that is, represented by 0s and 1s. In the arts, the digital age has broadened and enhanced the conceptual landscape (...)
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  12. K. E. Gover (2011). Artistic Freedom and Moral Rights in Contemporary Art: The Mass MoCA Controversy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (4):355-365.
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  13. Lisa Heldken (2002). Book Review: Carolyn Korsmeyer. Making Sense of Taste. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):283-286.
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  14. Eileen John (2012). Beauty, Interest, and Autonomy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):193-202.
  15. Horace Meyer Kallen (1913). Art, Philosophy, and Life. International Journal of Ethics 24 (1):37-54.
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  16. Jerrold Levinson (ed.) (2014). Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan.
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  17. Stefan Majetschak (2007). Kunst und Kennerschaft: Wittgenstein uber das Verstaendis und die Erklaerung von Kunstwerken. In Wilhelm Luetterfelds Stefan Majetschak (ed.), Ethik und Aesthetik sind Eins: Beitraege zu Wittgensteins Aesthetik und Kunstphilosophie (Wittgenstein Studien 15). 49-68.
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  18. Andrew Mcgonigal (2011). Philosophical Perspectives on Art by Davies, Stephen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):231-233.
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  19. Daniéle Moyal-Sharrock (2009). The Fiction of Paradox: Really Feeling for Anna Karenina. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    How is it that we can be moved by what we know does not exist? In this paper, I examine the so-called 'paradox of fiction', showing that it fatally hinges on cognitive theories of emotion such as Kendall Walton's pretend theory and Peter Lamarque's thought theory. I reject these theories and acknowledge the concept-formative role of genuine emotion generated by fiction. I then argue, contra Jenefer Robinson, that this 'éducation sentimentale' is not achieved through distancing, but rather through the engagement (...)
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  20. Amy Mullin (1996). Art, Politics and Knowledge: Feminism, Modernity, and the Separation of Spheres. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):118-145.
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  21. Hilary Radner (2003). Book Review: Cynthia A. Freeland. The Naked and the Undead: Evil and the Appeal of Horror. Boulder: Westview Press. 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (2):215-222.
  22. L. Richardson (2012). The Philosophy of Wine: A Case of Truth, Beauty and Intoxication, by Cain Todd. Mind 121 (484):1135-1138.
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  23. Aaron Smuts (2010). The Ghost is the Thing: Can Fiction Reveal Audience Belief? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):219-239.
    Can fictions sometimes reveal important information about what beliefs audience members hold? I argue that a case can be made that emotional responses to some horror fictions can reveal that audiences harbor beliefs in the supernatural, beliefs that audience members might otherwise deny holding. To clarify the terms of the discussion, I begin with an overview of two leading theories of belief: the representational and dispositional accounts. I explore the role of belief in the production of emotional responses by posing (...)
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  24. R. Stecker (2011). Should We Still Care About the Paradox of Fiction? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):295-308.
    The paradox of fiction presents an inconsistent triad of propositions, all of which are purported to be plausible or difficult to abandon. Here is an instance of the paradox: (1) Sally pities Anna (where Anna is the character Anna Karenina). (2) To pity someone, one must believe that they exist and are suffering. (3) Sally does not believe that Anna exists. Here is the problem. The paradox was formulated during the heyday of the cognitive theory of the emotions when there (...)
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  25. S. J. Wilsmore (1987). Unmasking Skepticism About Restoration. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (2):304-306.
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  26. Jeffrey Wilson (2007). Museum Skepticism: A History of the Display of Art in Public Galleries by Carrier, David. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (3):338–339.
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Aesthetic Education
  1. Elizabeth Anne Bauer (2004). Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):186-188.
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  2. June Boyce-Tillman (2004). Towards an Ecology of Music Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):102-125.
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  3. Deborah Bradley (2011). In the Space Between the Rock and the Hard Place: State Teacher Certification Guidelines and Music Education for Social Justice. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):79-96.
    Différend: A case of conflict between (at least) two parties, that cannot be equitably resolved for lack of a rule of judgment applicable to both arguments. . . . A wrong results from the fact that the rules of the genre of discourse by which one judges are not those of the judged genre or genres of discourse. This paper looks at the State of Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) Guidelines for Music Teacher Education, a governmentally defined technology of (...)
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  4. Rhett Diessner & Kayla Burke (2011). The Beauty of the Psyche and Eros Myth: Integrating Aesthetics Into Introduction to Psychology. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):97-108.
    Beginning in the late 1990s we became convinced that our undergraduate psychology students needed classroom experiences that set the conditions for them to become more engaged with beauty. We recognized the intrinsic importance of beauty to human psychological development, beyond any utilitarian concerns.1 But we also believed that there were important psychological benefits to be gained by becoming increasingly engaged with beauty. In this paper we briefly describe some of those benefits that have been documented in the psychological research literature (...)
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  5. Mark Garberich (2004). Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):188-193.
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  6. Claudia Gluschankof (2004). Response to June Boyce-Tillman, "Towards an Ecology of Music Education&Quot. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):181-186.
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  7. Jan Jagodzinski (2010). Visual Art and Education in an Era of Designer Capitalism: Deconstructing the Oral Eye. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The oral eye is a metaphor for the dominance of global designer capitalism. It refers to the consumerism of a designer aesthetic by the ‘I’ of the neoliberalist subject, as well as the aural soundscapes that accompany the hegemony of the capturing attention through screen cultures. An attempt is made to articulate the historical emergence of such a synoptic machinic regime drawing on Badiou, Bellmer, Deleuze, Guattari, Lacan, Rancière, Virilio, Ziarek, and Žižek to explore contemporary art (post-Situationism) and visual cultural (...)
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  8. Greg Littmann (2012). American Gods is All Lies! In Tracy Lyn Bealer, Rachel Luria & Wayne Yuen (eds.), Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild! Open Court.
  9. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics.
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper advances a thesis about the psychological origins of perceptual art. First, it delineates the aspects of art that need explaining: not just why it is attractive, but why fine execution and form—which have to do with how the attraction is achieved—matter over and above attractiveness. Second, it states certain constraints: we need to explain (...)
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  10. Brian Ribeiro (2007). Hume's Standard of Taste and the de Gustibus Sceptic. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):16-28.
    In 'Of the Standard of Taste' Hume aspires to silence the 'extravagant' cavils of the anything-goes de gustibus sceptic by developing a programme of aesthetic education that would lead all properly-trained individuals to a set of agreed-upon aesthetic judgements. But I argue that if we read Hume's essay as an attempted direct theoretical refutation of de gustibus scepticism, Hume fails to achieve his aim. Moreover, although some recent commentators have read the essay as aiming at a less ambitious ‘sceptical solution’ (...)
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  11. Robert Stecker (2012). Plato. In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. 8-20.
  12. June Tillman (2004). Towards an Ecology of Music Education. Philosophy of Music Education Review 12 (2):102-125.
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  13. Sheryl Tuttle Ross (2002). Understanding Propaganda: The Epistemic Merit Model and Its Application to Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 36 (1):16-30.
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  14. Frederic Will (2011). Ontology and the Products of Spirit: A Classroom Conversation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):67-78.
    Among the casualties of the rush to relativism is a central tenet of classical thought: that great works of literature are great in and of themselves and not because of the needs and values of their time. This “canon-based view,” supply taken for granted by Johnson, Arnold, Pope, and Eliot, has long since been shown the door by views ranging from Marxism to today’s cultural studies. These views hold that the great works become great because of the values and concerns (...)
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Aesthetic Qualities
See also: Humour
  1. Rudolf Arnheim (1996). Beauty as Suitability. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (3):251-253.
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  2. Malcolm Budd (2006). The Characterization of Aesthetic Qualities by Essential Metaphors and Quasi-Metaphors. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):133-143.
    My paper examines a vital but neglected aspect of Frank Sibley's pioneering account of aesthetic concepts. This is the claim that many aesthetic qualities are such that they can be characterized adequately only by metaphors or ‘quasi-metaphors’. Although there is no indication that Sibley embraced it, I outline a radical, minimalist conception of the experience of perceiving an item as possessing an aesthetic quality, which, I believe, has wide application and which would secure Sibley's position for those aesthetic qualities that (...)
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  3. Rafael De Clercq (2013). Reflections on a Sofa Bed: Functional Beauty and Looking Fit. Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (2):35-48.
    This essay argues for two conclusions about functional beauty, as this notion has been understood by Parsons and Carlson in a recent book by the same name. First of all, it is argued that functional beauty either is not a distinct kind of beauty or that the members of this kind are not all and only instances of the property of looking fit. Second, it is argued that functional beauty is relative only to categories corresponding to essential functions. The second (...)
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  4. Rafael De Clercq (2005). The Aesthetic Peculiarity of Multifunctional Artefacts. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):412-425.
    Echoing a distinction made by David Wiggins in his discussion of the relation of identity, this paper investigates whether aesthetic adjectives such as ‘beautiful’ are sortal-relative or merely sortal-dependent. The hypothesis guiding the paper is that aesthetic adjectives, though probably sortal-dependent in general, are sortal-relative only when used to characterize multifunctional artefacts. This means that multifunctional artefacts should be unique in allowing the following situation to occur: for some object x there are sortals K and K' such that x is (...)
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  5. C. E. Emmer (1998). Kitsch Against Modernity. Art Criticism 13 (1):53-80.
    "The writer discusses the concept of kitsch. Having reviewed a variety of approaches to kitsch, he posits an historical conception of it, connecting it to modernity and defining it as a coping-mechanism for modernity. He thus suggests that kitsch is best understood as a tool in the struggle against the particular stresses of the modern world and that it uses materials at hand, fashioning from them some sort of stability largely through projecting images of nature, stasis, and continuity. He discusses (...)
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  6. Alan H. Goldman (1990). Aesthetic Qualities and Aesthetic Value. Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
    To say that an object is beautiful or ugly is seemingly to refer to a property of the object. But it is also to express a positive or negative response to it, a set of aesthetic values, and to suggest that others ought to respond in the same way. Such judg- ments are descriptive, expressive, and normative or prescriptive at once. These multiple features are captured well by Humean accounts that analyze the judgments as ascribing relational properties. To say that (...)
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  7. Göran Hermerén (1973). Aesthetic Qualities, Value and Emotive Meaning. Theoria 39 (1-3):71-100.
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  8. D. H. Hick (2012). Aesthetic Supervenience Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):301-316.
    In this paper, I hope to reintroduce debate on the issue of aesthetic supervenience, especially in light of work undertaken by metaphysicians in recent years. After providing a brief walkthrough of some of the major views on supervenience generally, including several important metaphysical distinctions, I build upon views by Jerrold Levinson, John Bender, Nick Zangwill, and Gregory Currie, to develop a realist thesis of strong local supervenience, such that aesthetic properties of artworks and other objects depend upon their formal/structural properties (...)
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  9. Peter Kivy (1968). Aesthetic Aspects and Aesthetic Qualities. Journal of Philosophy 65 (4):85-93.
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  10. Thomas Leddy (1995). Everyday Surface Aesthetic Qualities: "Neat," "Messy," "Clean," "Dirty". Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):259-268.
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