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  1. Linda Alcoff (2004). Against "Post-Ethnic" Futures. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (2):99-117.
  2. Linda Martin Alcoff, Latinos and the Categories of Race.
    Apparently, Latinos are “taking over.” 1 With news that Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States, the public airwaves are filled with concerned voices about the impact that a non-English dominant, Catholic, non-white, largely poor population will have on “American” identity. Aside from the hysteria, Latino identity poses some authentically new questions for the standard way in which minority identities are conceptualized. Are Latinos a race, an ethnicity, or some combination? What does it mean to have (...)
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  3. Linda Martín Alcoff (2008). Surviving Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality by Jorge J. E. Gracia; Mapping the Boundaries of Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality. International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (2):231-238.
  4. Linda Martín Alcoff (2005). Latino Vs. Hispanic: The Politics of Ethnic Names. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (4):395-407.
    The politics of ethnic names, such as ‘Latino’ and ‘Hispanic’, raises legitimate issues for three reasons: because non-political considerations of descriptive adequacy are insufficient to determine absolutely the question of names; political considerations may be germane to an ethnic name’s descriptive adequacy; and naming opens up the political question of a chosen furture, to which we are accountable. The history of colonial and neo-colonial conditions structuring the relations of the North, Central and South Americas is both critical in understanding the (...)
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  5. Michael D. Barber (2001). Sartre, Phenomenology and the Subjective Approach to Race and Ethnicity in Black Orpheus. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (3):91-103.
    While Appiah and Soyinka criticize racial essentializing in Sartre and the Negritude poets, Sartre in Black Orpheus interprets the Negritudinists as employing a phenomenological, anamnestic retrieval of subjective experience. This retrieval uncovers two ethical attitudes: a less exploitative approach toward nature, and a conversion of slavery’s suffering into a stimulus for universal liberation. These attitudes spring from peasant cultural traditions and ethical responses to others’ race-based cruelty, rather than emanating from mystified ‘blackness’. Alfred Schutz’s because-motive analysis, a process of narrative (...)
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  6. Catriona Bass (2005). Learning to Love the Motherland: Educating Tibetans in China. Journal of Moral Education 34 (4):433-449.
    A major goal of education for Tibetans, as for all China's ?minority nationalities?, has been to encourage patriotism towards China and to foster a sense of nationhood. This paper considers the ways in which this priority has conditioned the schooling of Tibetans since 1950. Although this priority is unchanging, the paper looks at how it varies in degree and content as political leaders or policies change. An analysis of the primary curriculum reveals the process whereby Tibetan ethnicity is recreated through (...)
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  7. Lawrence Blum (2010). Latinos on Race and Ethnicity : Alcoff, Corlett, and Gracia. In Susana Nuccetelli, Ofelia Schutte & Otávio Bueno (eds.), A Companion to Latin American Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
  8. Carlos Coloma & Duncan Pedersen (1985). Salud y enfermedad en un contexto étnico: Salasacas. Cultura 7 (2113).
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  9. Jorge J. E. Gracia (2005). A Political Argument in Favor of Ethnic Names: Alcoff’s Defense of ‘Latino’. Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (4):409-417.
  10. Adam Hochman (2014). Do We Need a Device to Acquire Ethnic Concepts? Philosophy of Science 80 (5):994-1005.
    Francisco Gil-White argues that the ubiquity of racialism—the view that so-called races have biological essences—can be explained as a by-product of a shared mental module dedicated to ethnic cognition. Gil-White’s theory has been endorsed, with some revisions, by Edouard Machery and Luc Faucher. In this skeptical response I argue that our developmental environments contain a wealth, rather than a poverty of racialist stimulus, rendering a nativist explanation of racialism redundant. I also argue that we should not theorize racialism in isolation (...)
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  11. James W. Nickel (1995). What's Wrong with Ethnic Cleansing? Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):5-15.
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  12. James W. Nickel (1994). Ethnocide and Indigenous Peoples1. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (s1):84-98.
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  13. Susana Nuccetelli (2007). What Is an Ethnic Group? In Jorge J. E. Gracia (ed.), Race or Ethnicity? On Black and Latino Identity. Cornell University Press.
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  14. Barry Smith (1997). The Cognitive Geometry of War. In Peter Koller & Klaus Puhl (eds.), Current Issues in Political Philosophy: Justice in Society and World Order. Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.
    When national borders in the modern sense first began to be established in early modern Europe, non-contiguous and perforated nations were a commonplace. According to the conception of the shapes of nations that is currently preferred, however, nations must conform to the topological model of (approximate) circularity; their borders must guarantee contiguity and simple connectedness, and such borders must as far as possible conform to existing topographical features on the ground. The striving to conform to this model can be seen (...)
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  15. Lisa Tessman & Bat-Ami Bar On (eds.) (2001). Jewish Locations: Traversing Racialized Landscapes. Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume brings together essays that reflect on ontological and moral dilemmas regarding Jewish identity and race. The reflections offered here take place in the context of post-Holocaust transformations and pay special attention to the double processes of the deracialization of Jews qua Jews and the recasting of Jews both in reracialized and in other terms. As a result, the essays bring together and create intersections between Jewish studies and critical theories of race and help stretch the limits of as (...)
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