Search results for 'Kathleen Matthews' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, David Loy, James F. Keenan, Kathleen Matthews, Terry Winograd & Laurie Zoloth (2007). The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 2). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):268-280.score: 240.0
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  2. Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, David Loy, James F. Keenan, Kathleen Matthews, Terry Winograd & Laurie Zoloth (2007). The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 1). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):229-239.score: 240.0
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  3. Nicole Matthews, Kathleen Ellem & Lesley Chenoweth (2013). Crafting and Retelling Everyday Lives—: Disabled People's Contribution to Bioethical Concerns. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (3):235-240.score: 240.0
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  4. GB Matthews, Responses - Gareth B. Matthews.score: 180.0
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  5. Michael R. Matthews (1994). Science Teaching: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 60.0
    History, Philosophy and Science Teaching argues that science teaching and science teacher education can be improved if teachers know something of the history and philosophy of science and if these topics are included in the science curriculum. The history and philosophy of science have important roles in many of the theoretical issues that science educators need to address: the goals of science education; what constitutes an appropriate science curriculum for all students; how science should be taught in traditional cultures; what (...)
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  6. H. E. Matthews (1969). Strawson on Transcendental Idealism. Philosophical Quarterly 19 (76):204-220.score: 60.0
    Kant's philosophy of arithmetic / by Charles Parsons -- Visual geometry / by James Hopkins -- The proof-structure of Kant's transcendental deduction / by Dieter Henrich -- Imagination and perception / by P.F. Strawson -- Kant's categories and their schematism / by Lauchlan Chipman -- Transcendental arguments / by Barry Stroud -- Strawson on transcendental idealism / by H.E. Matthews -- Self-knowledge / by W.H. Walsh -- The age and size of the world / by Jonathan Bennett.
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  7. Eric Matthews (1996). Twentieth-Century French Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Philosophy plays an integral role in French society, affecting its art, drama, politics, and culture. In this accessible, chronological survey, Matthews offers some explanations for the enduring popularity of the subject and traces the developments that French philosophy has taken in the twentieth century, from its roots in the thought of Descartes to key figures such as Bergson, Sartre, Marcel, Merleau-Ponty, Foucault, Derrida, and the recent French Feminists.
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  8. Bruce Matthews (2011). Life as the Schema of Freedom: Schelling’s Organic Form of Philosophy. SUNY.score: 60.0
    The life and ideas of F. W. J. Schelling are often overlooked in favor of the more familiar Kant, Fichte, or Hegel. What these three lack, however, is Schelling’s evolving view of philosophy. Where others saw the possibility for a single, unflinching system of thought, Schelling was unafraid to question the foundations of his own ideas. In this book, Bruce Matthews argues that the organic view of philosophy is the fundamental idea behind Schelling’s thought. Focusing in particular on Schelling’s (...)
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  9. Gareth B. Matthews (1999). Socratic Perplexity and the Nature of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Gareth Matthews suggests that we can better understand the nature of philosophical inquiry if we recognize the central role played by perplexity. The seminal representation of philosophical perplexity is in Plato's dialogues; Matthews examines the intriguing shifts in Plato's attitude to perplexity and suggests that these may represent a course of philosophical development that philosophers follow even today.
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  10. Gareth B. Matthews (1964). Ockham's Supposition Theory and Modern Logic. Philosophical Review 73 (1):91-99.score: 60.0
    Philotheus boehner's "medieval logic" gives the impression that medieval supposition theory and modern quantification theory agree on their interpretation of particular propositions but differ on their interpretation of universal propositions. Matthews shows that this impression is mistaken: they differ on both particular and universal propositions, And the basic reason is that the medievals quantify over terms while modern logicians quantify over variables. (staff).
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  11. Pia Matthews (2013). Human Dignity and the Profoundly Disabled. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 17 (2):185 - 203.score: 60.0
    One challenge to the concept of human dignity is that it is a rootless notion invoked simply to mask inequalities that inevitably exist between human beings. This privileging of humans is speciesist and its weak point is the profoundly disabled human being. This article argues that far from being a weak point, the profoundly disabled person is a source of strength and witness to the intrinsic dignity that all human beings have by virtue of being human. The disabled represent the (...)
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  12. Steven Matthews (2008). Theology and Science in the Thought of Francis Bacon. Ashgate Pub..score: 40.0
    Breaking with a Puritan past -- A mother's concern -- Turmoil and diversity in the English Reformation -- The influences and the options available in English -- Reformation theology -- Intellectual trends : patristics and hebrew -- Millennialism and the belief in a providential age -- Bacon's break with the godly -- Bacon's turn toward the ancient faith -- The formative years -- Bacon and Andrewes -- The Meditationes sacrae and Bacon's turn away from calvinism -- Bacon's confession of faith (...)
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  13. Dean Cocking & Steve Matthews (2001). Unreal Friends. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):223-231.score: 30.0
    It has become quite common for people to develop `personal'' relationships nowadays, exclusively via extensive correspondence across the Net. Friendships, even romantic love relationships, are apparently, flourishing. But what kind of relations really are possible in this way? In this paper, we focus on the case of close friendship. There are various important markers that identify a relationship as one of close friendship. One will have, for instance, strong affection for the other, a disposition to act for their well-being and (...)
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  14. Steve Matthews (1998). Personal Identity, Multiple Personality Disorder, and Moral Personhood. Philosophical Psychology 11 (1):67-88.score: 30.0
    Marya Schechtman argues that psychological continuity accounts of personal identity, as represented by Derek Parfit's account, fail to escape the circularity objection. She claims that Parfit's deployment of quasi-memory (and other quasi-psychological) states to escape circularity implicitly commit us to an implausible view of human psychology. Schechtman suggests that what is lacking here is a coherence condition, and that this is something essential in any account of personal identity. In response to this I argue first that circularity may be escaped (...)
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  15. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2003). Delusion, Dissociation and Identity. Philosophical Explorations 6 (1):31-49.score: 30.0
    The condition known as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) or Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is metaphysically strange. Can there really be several distinct persons operating in a single body? Our view is that DID sufferers are single persons with a severe mental disorder. In this paper we compare the phenomenology of dissociation between personality states in DID with certain delusional disorders. We argue both that the burden of proof must lie with those who defend the metaphysically extravagant Multiple Persons view and (...)
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  16. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2002). Identity, Control and Responsibility: The Case of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Philosophical Psychology 15 (4):509-526.score: 30.0
    Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) (formerly known as Multiple Personality Disorder) is a condition in which a person appears to possess more than one personality, and sometimes very many. Some recent criminal cases involving defendants with DID have resulted in "not guilty" verdicts, though the defense is not always successful in this regard. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong and Stephen Behnke have argued that we should excuse DID sufferers from responsibility, only if at the time of the act the person was insane (typically delusional); (...)
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  17. Eric Matthews (2005). Unconscious Reasons. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (1):55-57.score: 30.0
  18. Frances Egan & Robert J. Matthews (2006). Doing Cognitive Neuroscience: A Third Way. Synthese 153 (3):377-391.score: 30.0
    The “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches have been thought to exhaust the possibilities for doing cognitive neuroscience. We argue that neither approach is likely to succeed in providing a theory that enables us to understand how cognition is achieved in biological creatures like ourselves. We consider a promising third way of doing cognitive neuroscience, what might be called the “neural dynamic systems” approach, that construes cognitive neuroscience as an autonomous explanatory endeavor, aiming to characterize in its own terms the states and (...)
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  19. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2003). The Unity and Disunity of Agency. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):308-312.score: 30.0
    Effective agency, according to contemporary Kantians, requires a unity of purpose both at a time, in order that we may eliminate conflict among our motives, and over time, because many of the things we do form part of longer-term projects and make sense only in the light of these projects and life plans. Call this the unity of agency thesis. This thesis can be regarded as a normative constraint on accounts of personal identity and indeed on accounts of what it (...)
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  20. Robert J. Matthews (1981). Literary Works and Institutional Practices. British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (1):39-49.score: 30.0
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  21. Robert J. Matthews (1997). Can Connectionists Explain Systematicity? Mind and Language 12 (2):154-77.score: 30.0
  22. Robert J. Matthews (1994/2010). The Measure of Mind. Mind 103 (410):131-46.score: 30.0
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  23. Gareth B. Matthews (1977). Consciousness and Life. Philosophy 52 (January):13-26.score: 30.0
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  24. Gareth B. Matthews (1990). Aristotelian Essentialism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:251-262.score: 30.0
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  25. J. Merritt Matthews (1931). A Note on the Time-Retarding Journey. Journal of Philosophy 28 (16):435-441.score: 30.0
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  26. Robert J. Matthews (2006). Knowledge of Language and Linguistic Competence. Philosophical Issues 16 (1):200–220.score: 30.0
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  27. Robert J. Matthews (2001). Cowie's Anti-Nativism. Mind and Language 16 (2):215-230.score: 30.0
  28. Gareth B. Matthews (1981). On Being Immoral in a Dream. Philosophy 56 (January):47-64.score: 30.0
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  29. Michael R. Matthews (1988). A Role for History and Philosophy in Science Teaching. Educational Philosophy and Theory 20 (2):67–81.score: 30.0
    It is thirty years since the last major reforms of science education. many believe that it is time for reappraisal of these earlier curricula, and for the renewal of science education-its content, aims, methods. also, and importantly, there is a renewed interest in the preparation of science teachers. this essay is a contribution to that task.
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  30. Jay G. Hull, Laurie B. Slone, Karen B. Meteyer & Amanda R. Matthews (2002). The Nonconsciousness of Self-Consciousness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 83 (2):406-424.score: 30.0
  31. Steve Matthews (2000). Survival and Separation. Philosophical Studies 98 (3):279-303.score: 30.0
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  32. Gareth B. Matthews (1982). Conceiving Childhood: "Child Animism". Noûs 16 (1):29-37.score: 30.0
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  33. Jeanette Kennett & Steve Matthews (2008). What's the Buzz? Undercover Marketing and the Corruption of Friendship. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (1):2–18.score: 30.0
    Undercover marketing targets potential customers by concealing the commercial nature of an apparently social transaction. In a typical case an individual approaches a marketing target apparently to provide some information or advice about a product in a way that makes it seem like they are a fellow consumer. In another kind of case, a friend displays a product to you, and encourages its purchase, but fails to disclose their association with the marketing firm. We focus on this second type of (...)
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  34. Steve Matthews (2003). Blaming Agents and Excusing Persons: The Case of DID. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 10 (2):169-74.score: 30.0
  35. David Basin, Seán Matthews & Luca Viganò (1998). Natural Deduction for Non-Classical Logics. Studia Logica 60 (1):119-160.score: 30.0
    We present a framework for machine implementation of families of non-classical logics with Kripke-style semantics. We decompose a logic into two interacting parts, each a natural deduction system: a base logic of labelled formulae, and a theory of labels characterizing the properties of the Kripke models. By appropriate combinations we capture both partial and complete fragments of large families of non-classical logics such as modal, relevance, and intuitionistic logics. Our approach is modular and supports uniform proofs of soundness, completeness and (...)
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  36. Patricia M. Matthews (1998). Hutcheson on the Idea of Beauty. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (2):233-259.score: 30.0
  37. Steve Matthews (2003). Establishing Personal Identity in Cases of DID. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 10 (2):143-51.score: 30.0
  38. Steve Matthews (2004). Parfit's 'Realism' and His Reductionism. Philosophia 31 (4):531-41.score: 30.0
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  39. Gareth B. Matthews (1971). Dualism and Solecism. Philosophical Review 80 (January):85-95.score: 30.0
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  40. Gareth B. Matthews (1977). Surviving As. Analysis 37 (January):53-58.score: 30.0
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  41. Patricia M. Matthews (1996). Kant's Sublime: A Form of Pure Aesthetic Reflective Judgment. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (2):165-180.score: 30.0
  42. Robert J. Matthews (1977). Describing and Interpreting a Work of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 36 (1):5-14.score: 30.0
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  43. G. M. Matthews (1958). `Evaluative and Descriptive'. Mind 67 (267):335-343.score: 30.0
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  44. Patricia M. Matthews (1997). Feeling and Aesthetic Judgment: A Rejoinder to Tom Huhn. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (1):58-60.score: 30.0
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  45. Robert J. Matthews (1989). The Alleged Evidence for Representationalism. In Stuart Silvers (ed.), Rerepresentation. Kluwer.score: 30.0
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  46. Robert J. Matthews (1994). Three-Concept Monte: Explanation, Implementation, and Systematicity. Synthese 101 (3):347-63.score: 30.0
    Fodor and Pylyshyn (1988), Fodor and McLaughlin (1990) and McLaughlin (1993) challenge connectionists to explain systematicity without simply implementing a classical architecture. In this paper I argue that what makes the challenge difficult for connectionists to meet has less to do with what is to be explained than with what is to count as an explanation. Fodor et al. are prepared to admit as explanatory, accounts of a sort that only classical models can provide. If connectionists are to meet the (...)
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  47. David Basin, Seán Matthews & Luca Viganò (1998). Labelled Modal Logics: Quantifiers. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 7 (3):237-263.score: 30.0
    In previous work we gave an approach, based on labelled natural deduction, for formalizing proof systems for a large class of propositional modal logics that includes K, D, T, B, S4, S4.2, KD45, and S5. Here we extend this approach to quantified modal logics, providing formalizations for logics with varying, increasing, decreasing, or constant domains. The result is modular with respect to both properties of the accessibility relation in the Kripke frame and the way domains of individuals change between worlds. (...)
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  48. Eric Matthews (2000). Autonomy and the Psychiatric Patient. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):59–70.score: 30.0
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  49. Eric Matthews (1997). Book Review: Twentieth-Century French Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 21 (1).score: 30.0
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  50. Patricia M. Matthews (2001). Aesthetic Appreciation of Art and Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (4):395-410.score: 30.0
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