Search results for 'Lewis Foster' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Sanjay K. Agarwal, Sylvia Estrada, Warren G. Foster, L. Lewis Wall, Doug Brown, Elaine S. Revis & Suzanne Rodriguez (2007). What Motivates Women to Take Part in Clinical and Basic Science Endometriosis Research? Bioethics 21 (5):263–269.
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  2.  33
    Lewis Foster (1971). Fatalism and Precognition. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 31 (3):341-351.
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  3. John Agresto, John E. Alvis, Donald R. Brand, Paul O. Carrese, Laurence D. Cooper, Murray Dry, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas S. Engeman, Christopher Flannery, Steven Forde, David Fott, David F. Forte, Matthew J. Franck, Bryan-Paul Frost, David Foster, Peter B. Josephson, Steven Kautz, John Koritansky, Peter Augustine Lawler, Howard L. Lubert, Harvey C. Mansfield, Jonathan Marks, Sean Mattie, James McClellan, Lucas E. Morel, Peter C. Meyers, Ronald J. Pestritto, Lance Robinson, Michael J. Rosano, Ralph A. Rossum, Richard S. Ruderman, Richard Samuelson, David Lewis Schaefer, Peter Schotten, Peter W. Schramm, Kimberly C. Shankman, James R. Stoner, Natalie Taylor, Aristide Tessitore, William Thomas, Daryl McGowan Tress, David Tucker, Eduardo A. Velásquez, Karl-Friedrich Walling, Bradley C. S. Watson, Melissa S. Williams, Delba Winthrop, Jean M. Yarbrough & Michael Zuckert (2003). History of American Political Thought. Lexington Books.
    This book is a collection of secondary essays on America's most important philosophic thinkers—statesmen, judges, writers, educators, and activists—from the colonial period to the present. Each essay is a comprehensive introduction to the thought of a noted American on the fundamental meaning of the American regime.
     
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  4. Owen Barfield, C. S. Lewis & G. B. Tennyson (1989). Owen Barfield on C.S. Lewis.
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  5. Michael Foster & Cameron Wybrow (1992). Creation, Nature, and Political Order in the Philosophy of Michael Foster the Classic Mind Articles and Others, with Modern Critical Essays. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  6. Lewis Foster (1969). The Causal Objection to Precognition. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):473.
     
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  7. D. W. Hamlyn, Clarence Irving Lewis, John D. Goheen & John L. Mothershead (1972). Collected Papers of Clarence Irving Lewis. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (86):68.
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  8.  6
    C. S. Lewis (1991). Letter From Lewis to Mr and Mrs Sheldon Vanauken. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):538-539.
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  9.  29
    David Lewis (1974). Spielman and Lewis on Inductive Immodesty. Philosophy of Science 41 (1):84-85.
  10.  7
    C. S. Lewis (1991). Lewis Explains His Reasons for Distrusting the so-Called. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):541-542.
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  11.  4
    Paul Cartledge, W. M. Calder Iii, R. S. Smith, J. Vaio & George Cornewall Lewis (2003). Teaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried MüllerTeaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried Muller. Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:262.
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  12.  3
    D. M. Lewis (1973). Naphtali Lewis: Greek Historical Documents: The Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xii+125. Toronto: Hakkert, 1971. Paper, $2.25. The Classical Review 23 (02):283-284.
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  13. John Foster & J. S. Metcalfe (2004). Evolution and Economic Complexity / Edited by John Foster and J. Stanley Metcalfe.
     
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  14. Mal Foster (2007). 67 Hal Foster. In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg 67.
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  15. Harry R. Lewis & Christos H. Papadimitriou (1998). Elements of the Theory of Computation Harry R. Lewis, Christos H. Papadimitriou.
     
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  16. Mark Lewis & Karen Allen (eds.) (2006). Mark Lewis. Liverpool University Press.
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  17. H. A. Lewis (1973). Modal Logic: The Lewis‐Modal Systems. Philosophical Books 14 (3):33-34.
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  18. David K. Lewis (1991). Parts of Classes with an Appendix by John P. Burgess, A.P. Hazen, and David Lewis.
     
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  19. Hywel David Lewis, Stewart R. Sutherland & T. A. Roberts (eds.) (1989). Religion, Reason, and the Self: Essays in Honour of Hywel D. Lewis. University of Wales Press.
     
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  20. Hywel D. Lewis (1983). Solitude in Philosophy and Literature: The H. B. Acton Memorial Lecture: Hywel D. Lewis. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 16:1-13.
    ‘I understand that the world was nothing, a mechanical chaos of casual, brute enmity on which we stupidly impose our hopes and fears. I understand that, finally and absolutely, I alone exist. All the rest, I saw, is merely what pushes me, or what I push against, blindly—as blindly as all that is not myself pushes back. I create the whole universe, blink by blink. —An ugly god pitifully dying in a tree.’.
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  21.  2
    Clarence Irving Lewis & Paul Arthur Schilpp (eds.) (1968). The Philosophy of C. I. Lewis. La Salle, Ill.,Open Court.
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  22.  5
    Foster Mcmurray (1968). C. I. Lewis on Social Unity. Educational Theory 18 (4):318-337.
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  23. Jessica M. Wilson (2015). Hume's Dictum and Metaphysical Modality: Lewis's Combinatorialism. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to David Lewis. Blackwell 138-158.
    Many contemporary philosophers accept Hume's Dictum, according to which there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct, intrinsically typed entities. Tacit in Lewis 's work is a potential motivation for HD, according to which one should accept HD as presupposed by the best account of the range of metaphysical possibilities---namely, a combinatorial account, applied to spatiotemporal fundamentalia. Here I elucidate and assess this Ludovician motivation for HD. After refining HD and surveying its key, recurrent role in (...) ’s work, I present Lewis ’s appeal to HD as providing a broadly axiomatic generating basis for the space of metaphysical modality, and canvas the prima facie advantages of the resulting combinatorial principle---HD ---as being principled, extensionally adequate and modally reductive. Most criticisms of Lewis 's combinatorialism have targeted seeming ways in which the theory overgenerates the desired space; I rather argue that HD seriously undergenerates the desired space in three different ways. For each way I argue that available means of overcoming the undergeneration either fail to close the gap, undermine the claim that HD is a principled generator of metaphysical modal space, undermine the reductive status of Lewis 's combinatorialism, or call into question the truth of HD. (shrink)
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  24.  40
    Katherine Hawley (forthcoming). David Lewis on Persistence. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), A Companion to David Lewis. Wiley-Blackwell 237-49.
    This paper provides an overview on David Lewis's writings about persistence. I focus on two issues. First, what is the relationship between the doctrine of Humean Supervenience and the rejection of endurantism? Second, why did Lewis not adopt a stage theory of persistence, given that he advocated a counterpart theory of modality?
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  25. Adán Salinas (1999). La imagen narrativa de Dios en C. S. Lewis, una lectura de “Las crónicas de Narnia”. Boletín de Filosofía (10):261-278.
    El artículo propone una interpretación de la obra literaria "Las Crónicas de Narnia" del autor ingles C. S Lewis. Tal interpretación posibilita considerar la alegoría religiosa que esta obra literaria realiza sobre la experiencia de la divinidad a través de la figura del León.
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  26.  47
    A. R. J. Fisher (forthcoming). On Lewis Against Magic: A Study of Method in Metaphysics. Synthese:1-19.
    David Lewis objected to theories that posit necessary connections between distinct entities and to theories that involve a magical grasping of their primitives. In On the Plurality of Worlds, Lewis objected to nondescript ersatzism on these grounds. The literature contains several reconstructions of Lewis ’ critique of nondescript ersatzism but none of these interpretations adequately address his main argument because they fail to see that Lewis ’ critique is based on broader methodological considerations. I argue that (...)
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  27.  5
    Daniel Nolan (forthcoming). It's a Kind of Magic: Lewis, Magic and Properties. Synthese:1-25.
    David Lewis’s arguments against magical ersatzism are notoriously puzzling. Untangling different strands in those arguments is useful for bringing out what he thought was wrong with not just one style of theory about possible worlds, but with much of the contemporary metaphysics of abstract objects. After setting out what I take Lewis’s arguments to be and how best to resist them, I consider the application of those arguments to general theories of properties and relations. The constraints (...)
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  28.  17
    Ryan Wasserman (2015). Lewis on Backward Causation. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):141-150.
    David Lewis famously defends a counterfactual theory of causation and a non-causal, similarity-based theory of counterfactuals. Lewis also famously defends the possibility of backward causation. I argue that this combination of views is untenable—given the possibility of backward causation, one ought to reject Lewis's theories of causation and counterfactuals.
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  29. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  30.  68
    Carla Merino-Rajme (2015). Why Lewis’ Appeal to Natural Properties Fails to Kripke’s Rule-Following Paradox. Philosophical Studies 172 (1):163-175.
    I consider Lewis’ appeal to naturalness to solve Kripke ’s rule - following paradox. I then present a different interpretation of this paradox and offer reasons for thinking that this is what Kripke had in mind. I argue that Lewis’ proposal cannot provide a solution to this version of paradox.
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  31.  84
    Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press 244-260.
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the Open (...)
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  32.  8
    Bernhard Salow (forthcoming). Lewis on Iterated Knowledge. Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    The status of the knowledge iteration principles in the account provided by Lewis in “Elusive Knowledge” is disputed. By distinguishing carefully between what in the account describes the contribution of the attributor’s context and what describes the contribution of the subject’s situation, we can resolve this dispute in favour of Holliday’s claim that the iteration principles are rendered invalid. However, that is not the end of the story. For Lewis’s account still predicts that counterexamples to the negative iteration (...)
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  33.  16
    Louis Derosset (2011). On the Plurality of Worlds: David Lewis. [REVIEW] Humana.Mente 19.
    A commentary on David Lewis's /On the Plurality of Worlds/.
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  34.  93
    Peter Menzies (1989). Probabilistic Causation and Causal Processes: A Critique of Lewis. Philosophy of Science 56 (4):642-663.
    This paper examines a promising probabilistic theory of singular causation developed by David Lewis. I argue that Lewis' theory must be made more sophisticated to deal with certain counterexamples involving pre-emption. These counterexamples appear to show that in the usual case singular causation requires an unbroken causal process to link cause with effect. I propose a new probabilistic account of singular causation, within the framework developed by Lewis, which captures this intuition.
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  35.  10
    Nathan Ballantyne & Justin Tosi (2015). David Foster Wallace on the Good Life. In Steven M. Cahn & Maureen Eckert (eds.), Freedom and the Self: Essays on the Philosophy of David Foster Wallace. Columbia University Press 133-168.
  36. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among (...)
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  37. Robert Stalnaker (2004). Lewis on Intentionality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):199 – 212.
    David Lewis's account of intentionality is a version of what he calls 'global descriptivism'. The rough idea is that the correct interpretation of one's total theory is the one (among the admissible interpretations) that come closest to making it true. I give an exposition of this account, as I understand it, and try to bring out some of its consequences. I argue that there is a tension between Lewis's global descriptivism and his rejection of a linguistic account of (...)
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  38. Joseph A. Baltimore (2011). Lewis' Modal Realism and Absence Causation. Metaphysica 12 (2):117-124.
    A major criticism of David Lewis’ counterfactual theory of causation is that it allows too many things to count as causes, especially since Lewis allows, in addition to events, absences to be causes as well. Peter Menzies has advanced this concern under the title “the problem of profligate causation.” In this paper, I argue that the problem of profligate causation provides resources for exposing a tension between Lewis’ acceptance of absence causation and his modal realism. The result (...)
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  39.  73
    Barry Maguire (2013). Defending David Lewis's Modal Reduction. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):129-147.
    David Lewis claims that his theory of modality successfully reduces modal items to nonmodal items. This essay will clarify this claim and argue that it is true. This is largely an exercise within ‘Ludovician Polycosmology’: I hope to show that a certain intuitive resistance to the reduction and a set of related objections misunderstand the nature of the Ludovician project. But these results are of broad interest since they show that would-be reductionists have more formidable argumentative resources than (...)
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  40.  76
    Charles Pigden & Rebecca E. B. Entwisle (2012). Spread Worlds, Plenitude and Modal Realism: A Problem for David Lewis. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor.
    In his metaphysical summa of 1986, The Plurality of Worlds, David Lewis famously defends a doctrine he calls ‘modal realism’, the idea that to account for the fact that some things are possible and some things are necessary we must postulate an infinity possible worlds, concrete entities like our own universe, but cut off from us in space and time. Possible worlds are required to account for the facts of modality without assuming that modality is primitive – that there (...)
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  41. Joshua Seachris & Linda Zagzebski (2007). Weighing Evils: The C. S. Lewis Approach. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):81 - 88.
    It is often argued that the great quantity of evil in our world makes God’s existence less likely than a lesser quantity would, and this, presumably, because the probability that some evils are gratuitous increases as the overall quantity of evil increases. Often, an additive approach to quantifying evil is employed in such arguments. In this paper, we examine C. S. Lewis’ objection to the additive approach, arguing that although he is correct to reject this approach, there is a (...)
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  42.  55
    Bruno Verbeek (2008). Conventions and Moral Norms: The Legacy of Lewis. Topoi 27 (1-2):73-86.
    David Lewis’ Convention has been a major source of inspiration for philosophers and social scientists alike for the analysis of norms. In this essay, I demonstrate its usefulness for the analysis of some moral norms. At the same time, conventionalism with regards to moral norms has attracted sustained criticism. I discuss three major strands of criticism and propose how these can be met. First, I discuss the criticism that Lewis conventions analyze norms in situations with no conflict of (...)
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  43.  57
    S. Oakley (2006). Defending Lewis's Local Miracle Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):337-349.
    Helen Beebee has recently argued that David Lewis’s account of compatibilism, so-called local miracle compatibilism, allows for the possibility that agents in deterministic worlds have the ability to break or cause the breaking of a law of nature. Because Lewis’s LMC allows for this consequence, Beebee claims that LMC is untenable and subsequently that Lewis’s criticism of van Inwagen’s Consequence Argument for incompatibilism is substantially weakened. I review Beebee’s argument against Lewis’s thesis and argue that Beebee (...)
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  44.  92
    Dan López de Sa (2014). Lewis Vs Lewis on the Problem of the Many. Synthese 191 (6):1105-1117.
    Consider a cat on a mat. On the one hand, there seems to be just one cat, but on the other there seem to be many things with as good a claim as anything in the vicinity to being a cat. Hence, the problem of the many. In his ‘Many, but Almost One,’ David Lewis offered two solutions. According to the first, only one of the many is indeed a cat, although it is indeterminate exactly which one. According to (...)
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  45.  70
    Alexander Bird (2008). The Epistemological Argument Against Lewis's Regularity View of Laws. Philosophical Studies 138 (1):73–89.
    I argue for the claim that if Lewis’s regularity theory of laws were true, we could not know any positive law statement to be true. Premise 1: According to that theory, for any law statement true of the actual world, there is always a nearby world where the law statement is false (a world that differs with respect to one matter of particular fact). Premise 2: One cannot know a proposition to be true if it is false in a (...)
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  46.  16
    David Vander Laan (2011). Lewis' Argument for Possible Worlds. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell
    This entry provides a brief exposition and formal reconstruction of the argument for possible worlds in David Lewis's Counterfactuals.
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  47. Michael McGlone, Lewis on What Puzzling Pierre Does Not Believe.
    In “What Puzzling Pierre Does not Believe”, Lewis ([4], 412‐4) argues that the sentences (1) Pierre believes that London is pretty and (2) Pierre believes that London is not pretty both truly describe Kripke’s well‐known situation involving puzzling Pierre ([3]). Lewis also argues that this situation is not one according to which Pierre believes either the proposition (actually) expressed by (3) London is pretty or the proposition (actually) expressed by (4) London is not pretty. These claims, Lewis (...)
     
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  48.  10
    J. Lewis McIntyre, H. Barker, Joseph Rickaby, Foster Watson, Herbert W. Blunt, T. B., S. H., A. E. Taylor, B. Russell & C. A. F. Rhys Davids (1904). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 13 (49):123-134.
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  49.  11
    Mary Douglas (2001). Dealing with Uncertainty. Ethical Perspectives 8 (3):145-155.
    In C.S. Lewis's science fiction parable Perelandra was a planet which had no solid ground. At all times the floating landscape was continually swirling and moving, chasms would appear where a minute before there had been safe standing. The rational beings who lived there hopped nimbly on to another little island when the one on which they stood disappeared under their feet. They were used to it and took it for granted that nothing was certain. The visitor from our (...)
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  50.  32
    Andrea Borghini (2002). Oggetti Possibili E Oggetti Esistenti: La Teoria di David K. Lewis. Kykeyon 2:67-77.
    Quasi al termine della seconda guerra mondiale, alcuni ufficiali tedeschi diedero l’ordine di abbattere le storiche torri di San Gimignano; tutto pareva ormai deciso, quando un gruppo di civili riuscì con successo a ritardare l’esecuzione fino all’arrivo delle truppe alleate. Grazie a quei civili, le torri di San Gimignano sono ancora ben visibili a tutti, meta ogni anno di numerosi turisti; ma che cosa dire della possibilità che oggi esistessero soltanto le loro macerie? Esse rientrano in quella classe di cose (...)
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