Search results for 'Ruth Egan' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andy Egan (2010). Disputing About Taste. In Ted Warfield & Richard Feldman (eds.), Disagreement. OUP.score: 30.0
    i> “There’s no disputing about taste.” That’s got a nice ring to it, but it’s not quite the ring of truth. While there’s definitely something right about the aphorism – there’s a reason why it is, after all, an aphorism, and why its utterance tends to produce so much nodding of heads and muttering of “just so” and “yes, quite” – it’s surprisingly difficult to put one’s finger on just what the truth in the neighborhood is, exactly. One thing that’s (...)
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  2. Andy Egan (2007). Some Counterexamples to Causal Decision Theory. Philosophical Review 116 (1):93-114.score: 30.0
    Many philosophers (myself included) have been converted to causal decision theory by something like the following line of argument: Evidential decision theory endorses irrational courses of action in a range of examples, and endorses “an irrational policy of managing the news”. These are fatal problems for evidential decision theory. Causal decision theory delivers the right results in the troublesome examples, and does not endorse this kind of irrational news-managing. So we should give up evidential decision theory, and be causal decision (...)
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  3. Andy Egan (2007). Epistemic Modals, Relativism and Assertion. Philosophical Studies 133 (1):1--22.score: 30.0
    I think that there are good reasons to adopt a relativist semantics for epistemic modal claims such as ``the treasure might be under the palm tree'', according to which such utterances determine a truth value relative to something finer-grained than just a world (or a <world, time> pair). Anyone who is inclined to relativise truth to more than just worlds and times faces a problem about assertion. It's easy to be puzzled about just what purpose would be served by assertions (...)
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  4. Tyler Doggett & Andy Egan (2007). Wanting Things You Don't Want: The Case for an Imaginative Analogue of Desire. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (9):1-17.score: 30.0
    You’re imagining, in the course of a different game of make-believe, that you’re a bank robber. You don’t believe that you’re a bank robber. You are moved to point your finger, gun-wise, at the person pretending to be the bank teller and say, “Stick ‘em up! This is a robbery!”.
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  5. Andy Egan (2008). Imagination, Delusion, and Self-Deception. In Tim Bayne & Jordi Fernandez (eds.), Delusion and Self-Deception: Affective and Motivational Influences on Belief Formation (Macquarie Monographs in Cognitive Science). Psychology Press.score: 30.0
    Subjects with delusions profess to believe some extremely peculiar things. Patients with Capgras delusion sincerely assert that, for example, their spouses have been replaced by impostors. Patients with Cotard’s delusion sincerely assert that they are dead. Many philosophers and psychologists are hesitant to say that delusional subjects genuinely believe the contents of their delusions.2 One way to reinterpret delusional subjects is to say that we’ve misidentified the content of the problematic belief. So for example, rather than believing that his wife (...)
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  6. Andy Egan (2007). Quasi-Realism and Fundamental Moral Error. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (2):205 – 219.score: 30.0
    A common first reaction to expressivist and quasi-realist theories is the thought that, if these theories are right, there's some objectionable sense in which we can't be wrong about morality. This worry turns out to be surprisingly difficult to make stick - an account of moral error as instability under improving changes provides the quasi-realist with the resources to explain many of our concerns about moral error. The story breaks down, though, in the case of fundamental moral error. This is (...)
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  7. Andy Egan & Adam Elga (2005). I Can't Believe I'm Stupid. Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):77–93.score: 30.0
    It is bad news to find out that one's cognitive or perceptual faculties are defective. Furthermore, it’s not always transparent how one ought to revise one's beliefs in light of such news. Two sorts of news should be distinguished. On the one hand, there is news that a faculty is unreliable -- that it doesn't track the truth particularly well. On the other hand, there is news that a faculty is anti-reliable -- that it tends to go positively wrong. These (...)
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  8. Andy Egan (2004). Second-Order Predication and the Metaphysics of Properties. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):48 – 66.score: 30.0
    Problems about the accidental properties of properties motivate us--force us, I think--not to identify properties with the sets of their instances. If we identify them instead with functions from worlds to extensions, we get a theory of properties that is neutral with respect to disputes over counterpart theory, and we avoid a problem for Lewis's theory of events. Similar problems about the temporary properties of properties motivate us--though this time they probably don't force us--to give up this theory as well, (...)
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  9. Andy Egan (2006). Appearance Properties? Noûs 40 (3):495-521.score: 30.0
    Intentionalism is the view that the phenomenal character of an experience is wholly determined by its representational content is very attractive. Unfortunately, it is in conflict with some quite robust intuitions about the possibility of phenomenal spectrum inversion without misrepresentation. Faced with such a problem, there are the usual three options: reject intentionalism, discount the intuitions and deny that spectrum inversion without misrepresentation is possible, or find a way to reconcile the two by dissolving the apparent conflict. Sydney Shoemaker's (1994) (...)
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  10. Andy Egan (2009). Billboards, Bombs and Shotgun Weddings. Synthese 166 (2):251 - 279.score: 30.0
    It's a presupposition of a very common way of thinking about contextsensitivity in language that the semantic contribution made by a bit of context-sensitive vocabulary is sensitive only to features of the speaker's situation at the time of utterance. I argue that this is false, and that we need a theory of context-dependence that allows for content to depend not just on the features of the utterance's origin, but also on features of its destination. There are cases in which a (...)
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  11. Andy Egan (2006). Secondary Qualities and Self-Location. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 72 (1):97-119.score: 30.0
    Colors aren't as real as shapes. Shapes are full?fledged qualities of things in themselves, independent of how they're perceived and by whom. Colors aren't. Colors are merely qualities of things as they are for us, and the colors of things depend on who is perceiving them. When we take the fully objective view of the world, things keep their shapes, but the colors fall away, revealed as the mere artifacts of our own subjective, parochial perspective on the world that they (...)
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  12. Andy Egan & James John, A Puzzle About Perception.score: 30.0
    experience supervene on the intrinsic properties of the experience.
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  13. Frances Egan (2003). Naturalistic Inquiry: Where Does Mental Representation Fit In? In Louise M. Antony (ed.), Chomsky and His Critics. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing. 89--104.score: 30.0
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  14. Andy Egan (2008). Seeing and Believing: Perception, Belief Formation and the Divided Mind. Philosophical Studies 140 (1):47 - 63.score: 30.0
    On many of the idealized models of human cognition and behavior in use by philosophers, agents are represented as having a single corpus of beliefs which (a) is consistent and deductively closed, and (b) guides all of their (rational, deliberate, intentional) actions all the time. In graded-belief frameworks, agents are represented as having a single, coherent distribution of credences, which guides all of their (rational, deliberate, intentional) actions all of the time. It's clear that actual human beings don't live up (...)
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  15. Frances Egan (1995). Computation and Content. Philosophical Review 104 (2):181-203.score: 30.0
  16. Andy Egan (2008). Pretense for the Complete Idiom. Noûs 42 (3):381 - 409.score: 30.0
  17. Frances Egan (2008). The Content of Color Experience. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):407–414.score: 30.0
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  18. Frances Egan (1995). Folk Psychology and Cognitive Architecture. Philosophy of Science 62 (2):179-96.score: 30.0
    It has recently been argued that the success of the connectionist program in cognitive science would threaten folk psychology. I articulate and defend a "minimalist" construal of folk psychology that comports well with empirical evidence on the folk understanding of belief and is compatible with even the most radical developments in cognitive science.
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  19. Frances Egan & Robert J. Matthews (2006). Doing Cognitive Neuroscience: A Third Way. Synthese 153 (3):377-391.score: 30.0
    The “top-down” and “bottom-up” approaches have been thought to exhaust the possibilities for doing cognitive neuroscience. We argue that neither approach is likely to succeed in providing a theory that enables us to understand how cognition is achieved in biological creatures like ourselves. We consider a promising third way of doing cognitive neuroscience, what might be called the “neural dynamic systems” approach, that construes cognitive neuroscience as an autonomous explanatory endeavor, aiming to characterize in its own terms the states and (...)
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  20. Frances Egan (1991). Must Psychology Be Individualistic? Philosophical Review 100 (April):179-203.score: 30.0
  21. Frances Egan (1992). Individualism, Computation, and Perceptual Content. Mind 101 (403):443-59.score: 30.0
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  22. Andy Egan & B. Weatherson (eds.) (2009). Epistemic Modality. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The ten new essays in this volume explore various answers to these questions, including those offered by contextualism, relativism, and expressivism.
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  23. Frances Egan (1999). In Defence of Narrow Mindedness. Mind and Language 14 (2):177-94.score: 30.0
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  24. Kieran Egan & Gillian Judson (2009). Values and Imagination in Teaching: With a Special Focus on Social Studies. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):126-140.score: 30.0
    Both local and global issues are typically dealt with in the Social Studies curriculum, or in curriculum areas with other names but similar intents. In the literature about Social Studies the imagination has played little role, and consequently it hardly appears in texts designed to help teachers plan and implement Social Studies lessons. What is true of Social Studies is also largely reflected in general texts concerning planning teaching. Clearly many theorists and practitioners are concerned to engage students' imaginations in (...)
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  25. Andy Egan & Brian Weatherson (2004). Prankster's Ethics. Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):45–52.score: 30.0
    Diversity is a good thing. Some of its value is instrumental. Having people around with diverse beliefs, or customs, or tastes, can expand our horizons and potentially raise to salience some potential true beliefs, useful customs or apt tastes. Even diversity of error can be useful. Seeing other people fall away from the true and the useful in distinctive ways can immunise us against similar errors. And there are a variety of pleasant interactions, not least philosophical exchange, that wouldn’t be (...)
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  26. Andy Egan, Secondary Qualities, Self-Locating Belief, and Sensible Relativism.score: 30.0
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  27. Frances Egan (1998). The Moon Illusion. Philosophy of Science 65 (4):604-23.score: 30.0
    Ever since Berkeley discussed the problem at length in his Essay Toward a New Theory of Vision, theorists of vision have attempted to explain why the moon appears larger on the horizon than it does at the zenith. Prevailing opinion has it that the contemporary perceptual psychologists Kaufman and Rock have finally explained the illusion. This paper argues that Kaufman and Rock have not refuted a Berkeleyan account of the illusion, and have over-interpreted their own experimental results. The moon illusion (...)
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  28. M. F. Egan (1991). Propositional Attitudes and the Language of Thought. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (September):379-88.score: 30.0
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  29. Kieran Egan (1979). Towards a Theory of Educational Development. Educational Philosophy and Theory 11 (2):17–36.score: 30.0
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  30. Frances Egan (1994). Aworld Withoutmind: Comments on Terence Horgan's “Naturalism and Intentionality”. Philosophical Studies 76 (2-3):327 - 338.score: 30.0
  31. Philip A. Egan (1996). Lonergan on Newman's Conversion. Heythrop Journal 37 (4):437–455.score: 30.0
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  32. D. A. Denton, M. J. McKinley, M. Farrell & G. F. Egan (2009). The Role of Primordial Emotions in the Evolutionary Origin of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):500-514.score: 30.0
  33. M. F. Egan (1989). What's Wrong with the Syntactic Theory of Mind. Philosophy of Science 56 (December):664-74.score: 30.0
    Stephen Stich has argued that psychological theories that instantiate his Syntactic Theory of Mind are to be preferred to content-based or representationalist theories, because the former can capture and explain a wider range of generalizations about cognitive processes than the latter. Stich's claims about the relative merits of the Syntactic Theory of Mind are unfounded. Not only is it false that syntactic theories can capture psychological generalizations that content-based theories cannot, but a large class of behavioral regularities, readily explained by (...)
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  34. Jennifer Ruth (2004). Book Reviews: Mesmerized: Powers of Mind in Victorian Britain, by Alison Winter. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998. 464 Pp. Svengali's Web: The Alien Enchanter in Modern Culture, by Daniel Pick. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000. 284 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (1):75-77.score: 30.0
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  35. Andy Egan (2007). Review: Relativism. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (462):387-390.score: 30.0
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  36. Kieran Egan (1984). Development in Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (2):187–194.score: 30.0
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  37. Erin A. Egan (2003). Organizational Ethics in Residency Training: Moral Conflict with Supervising Physicians. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (01):119-123.score: 30.0
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  38. Kenneth A. Strike & Kieran Egan (eds.) (1978). Ethics and Educational Policy. Routledge and K. Paul.score: 30.0
    Ambiguities in liberal 1 education and the problem of its content RSPeters INTRODUCTION If one was mounting a defence of certain distinctive values in ...
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  39. Frances Egan (1994). Individualism and Vision Theory. Analysis 54 (4):258-264.score: 30.0
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  40. Philip Egan (2008). Lonergan, Evangelisation and the British Context. Heythrop Journal 49 (5):794-821.score: 30.0
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  41. M. Frances Egan (1989). Book Review:Thoughts: An Essay on Content Christopher Peacocke. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 56 (2):359-.score: 30.0
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  42. Sheila Ruth (1979). Methodocracy, Misogyny, and Bad Faith: Sexism in the Philosophic Establishment. Metaphilosophy 10 (1):48–61.score: 30.0
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  43. F. Egan (2006). Review: Thought and World. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (457):152-156.score: 30.0
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  44. Kieran Egan (2008). The Future of Education: Reimagining Our Schools From the Ground Up. Yale University Press.score: 30.0
    This engaging book presents a frontal attack on current forms of schooling and a radical rethinking of the whole education process.
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  45. Kayhan P. Parsi & Erin A. Egan (2002). Patents: The Public Interest Versus the Private Privilege. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):45 – 46.score: 30.0
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  46. Anthony Egan (2010). Controversies in Political Theology: Development or Liberation? By Thia Cooper. Heythrop Journal 51 (4):710-710.score: 30.0
  47. Anthony Egan (2010). Dreams of Glory: The Sources of Apocalyptic Terror. By Richard K. Fenn, Roots of Religious Violence: A Critique of Ethnic Metaphors. By Ignatius Jesudasan and Modernity, Religion, and the War on Terror. By Richard Dien Winfield. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (4):719-720.score: 30.0
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  48. Anthony Egan (1997). Does a Real Albert Nolan Need Don Cupitt? A Response to Ronald Nicolson. Heythrop Journal 38 (2):180–190.score: 30.0
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  49. Erin A. Egan (2002). Ethics Training in Graduate Medical Education. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):26 – 28.score: 30.0
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  50. S. A. W. Ruth (1964). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 4 (2).score: 30.0
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