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Summary Some believe that individuals can not attain autonomy unless their culture provides them options.  Others, more commonly say that cultures provide the "context of choice" (Kymlicka) that make autonomy possible.  Whether or not such claims are accurate, it is clear that cultures can limit autonomy.  The relationship is thus worthy of extensive study; the pieces categorized here are contributions to such study.
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  1. Tofig Ahmadov (2008). Svasamvittih/Svasamvedana In the Light of Sartre's Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 8:55-61.
    Sartre posited a (nondual), nonreflexive, nonthetic, nonpositional awareness which makes all consciousness possible, and which underlies dualistic, thetic, positional consciousness of object. Though his description assumes dualistic, thetic, positional consciousness of object to be inherent in nondual, nonreflexive,nonthetic, nonpositional awareness and hence to be ineradicable, with some modifications it can explain the view of rdzogs-chen that the sems-sde series of teachings illustrate in nonphilosophical terms with the example of the primordial mirror in which both dualistic consciousness and its objects manifest (...)
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  2. Philipp Altmann (forthcoming). The Right to Self-Determination”: Right and Laws Between Means of Oppression and Means of Liberation in the Discourse of the Indigenous Movement of Ecuador. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-14.
    The 1970s and 1980s meant an ethnic politicization of the indigenous movement in Ecuador, until this moment defined largely as a class-based movement of indigenous peasants. The indigenous organizations started to conceptualize indigenous peoples as nationalities with their own economic, social, cultural and legal structures and therefore with the right to autonomy and self-determination. Based on this conceptualization, the movement developed demands for a pluralist reform of state and society in order to install a plurinational state with wide degrees of (...)
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  3. Allen Andrew A. Alvarez (2009). The Cross-Cultural Importance of Satisfying Vital Needs. Bioethics 23 (9):486-496.
    Ethical beliefs may vary across cultures but there are things that must be valued as preconditions to any cultural practice. Physical and mental abilities vital to believing, valuing and practising a culture are such preconditions and it is always important to protect them. If one is to practise a distinct culture, she must at least have these basic abilities. Access to basic healthcare is one way to ensure that vital abilities are protected. John Rawls argued that access to all-purpose primary (...)
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  4. Wanni Wibulswasdi Anderson & Douglas D. Anderson (1986). Thai Muslim Adolescents' Self, Sexuality} and Autonomy. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 14 (4):368-394.
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  5. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Review of kWong-Loi Shun, David B. Wong (Eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
  6. Shahid Athar (2008). Enhancement Technologies and the Person: An Islamic View. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (1):59-64.
    The availability of newer choices in contemporary bioethics, especially enhancement technologies, poses a challenge for Muslim patients and their care providers in making appropriate decisions. How should they reconcile personal autonomy with ethical guidelines of Islamic Shariah ? This article discusses such concerns.
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  7. A. Autiero & L. Galvagni (2010). Religious Issues and the Question of Moral Autonomy. In James J. Giordano & Bert Gordijn (eds.), Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives in Neuroethics. Cambridge University Press
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  8. Aletheia Peters Bajotto & Jose Roberto Goldim (2011). Case-Report: Autonomy and Self Determination of an Elderly Population in South Brazil. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (2).
  9. Yohanna Barth-Rogers & Alan Jotkowitz (2009). Executive Autonomy, Multiculturalism and Traditional Medical Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):39 – 40.
  10. Solveig Bergman (2002). The Politics of Feminism Autonomous Feminist Movements in Finland and West Germany From the 1960s to the 1980s.
  11. Jennifer Bleazby (2006). Autonomy, Democratic Community, and Citizenship in Philosophy for Children: Dewey and Philosophy for Children’s Rejection of the Individual/ Community Dualism. Analytic Teaching 26 (1):31-52.
  12. Vivienne Boon (2011). Jürgen Habermas and Islamic Fundamentalism: On the Limits of Discourse Ethics. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):153-166.
    Using the example of contemporary Islamic fundamentalism, and especially the writings of Sayyid Qutb, this article raises questions about discourse ethics as a mode of conflict resolution. It appears that discourse ethics is only relevant when all parties have already agreed to settle disputes deliberatively and already share the notions of rational deliberation and individual autonomy. This raises questions not only about the capability of discourse ethics to incorporate a deep plurality of worldviews, but also about its capability to successfully (...)
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  13. Michael Brannigan (2000). Cultural Diversity and the Case Against Ethical Relativism. Health Care Analysis 8 (3):321-327.
    The movement to respect culturaldiversity, known as multiculturalism, poses a dauntingchallenge to healthcare ethics. Can we construct adefensible passage from the fact of culturaldifferences to any claims regarding morality? Or doesmulticulturalism lead to ethical relativism? Macklinargues that, in view of a leading distinction betweenuniversalism in ethics and moral absolutism, the onlyreasonable passage avoids both absolutism andrelativism. She presents a strong case againstethical relativism and its pernicious consequences forcross-cultural issues in healthcare. She alsoprovides sound criteria for the assessment of aculture's moral (...)
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  14. Andrew Brennan & Ruiping Fan (2007). Autonomy and Interdependence: A Dialogue Between Liberalism and Confucianism. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (4):511–535.
  15. David C. Bricker (1998). Autonomy and Culture: Will Kymlicka on Cultural Minority Rights. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):47-59.
  16. Erica Brindley (2011). Moral Autonomy and Individual Sources of Authority in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):257-273.
  17. Jan Brouwer (2007). Culture and Contrasting Views on the Individual, Autonomy and Mortality with Special Reference to India. In Paula Banerjee & Samir Kumar Das (eds.), Autonomy: Beyond Kant and Hermeneutics. Anthem Press
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  18. Peter G. Brown & Henry Shue (1981). Boundaries, National Autonomy and its Limits.
  19. David I. Waddington Bruce Maxwell (2012). Interculturalism, Multiculturalism, and the State Funding and Regulation of Conservative Religious Schools. Educational Theory 62 (4):427-447.
    In this essay, Bruce Maxwell, David Waddington, Kevin McDonough, Andrée‐Anne Cormier, and Marina Schwimmer compare two competing approaches to social integration policy, Multiculturalism and Interculturalism, from the perspective of the issue of the state funding and regulation of conservative religious schools. After identifying the key differences between Interculturalism and Multiculturalism, as well as their many similarities, the authors present an explanatory analysis of this intractable policy challenge. Conservative religious schooling, they argue, tests a conceptual tension inherent in Multiculturalism between respect (...)
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  20. Margherita Brusa & Y. Michael Barilan (2009). Cultural Circumcision in Eu Public Hospitals – an Ethical Discussion. Bioethics 23 (8):470-482.
  21. Ester Busquets, Begoña Roman & Núria Terribas (2012). Bioethics in Mediterranean Culture: The Spanish Experience. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):437-451.
    This article presents a view of bioethics in the Spanish context. We may identify several features common to Mediterranean countries because of their relatively similar social organisation. Each country has its own distinguishing features but we would point two aspects which are of particular interest¨: the Mediterranean view of autonomy and the importance of Catholicism in Mediterranean culture. The Spanish experience on bioethics field has been marked by these elements, trying to build a civic ethics alternative, with the law as (...)
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  22. Giuseppe Cacciatore (2006). La escolástica española Y la génesis de la filosofía latinoamericana: Alonso briceño: Metafísica E individualidad. Límite 14:5-24.
    Más allá de la clásica concepción de la Escolástica como manifestación ideológica del poder político de los conquistadores, este estudio intenta ser un acercamiento a la interesante figura de Alonso Briceño. Del original punto de vista del filósofo chileno sobre el conocimiento intelectual y la experiencia de la individualidad deriva un principio de individuación que tiene carácter de positividad y realidad. En tal marco es posible destacar una objetiva relación entre la búsqueda política de una libre y autónoma identidad de (...)
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  23. H. G. Callaway (2000). Pragmatic Pluralism and American Democracy. In R. Tapp (ed.), Multiculturalism: Humanist Perspectives.
    This paper approaches "multiculturalism" obliquely via conceptions of social and political pluralism in the pragmatist tradition. As a matter of social analysis, the advent of multiculturalism implies some loss of confidence in our prior conceptions of accommodating ethnic, social, and religious diversity: the conversion of traditional American cultural diversity into a war of political interest groups. This, and the corresponding tendency toward cultural relativism and "anything goes," is fundamentally a product of over-centralization and cultural-political exhaustion in the wake of the (...)
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  24. Sue Campbell (2002). Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Automony, Agency, and the Social Self (Review). Hypatia 17 (2):165-168.
  25. Giuseppe Cantillo (2002). Etica Generale Ed Etica Cristiana Nel Pensiero di Ernst Troeltsch. Etica E Politica 4 (1).
    In his reflections on the problems raised by the Christian ethics, Troeltsch’s starting point has always been a general theory of ethics, which should have been structured of a theoretical and of a practical part. In this sense he can be seen as a representative of the development of the modern moral thought; in particular his intention was to develop Herrman’s idea of integrating Kant’s subjective ethics with Schleiermacher’s objective ethics. This Grundkonzeption of Troeltsch’s is extremely evident when analysing his (...)
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  26. Antoine Carlioz, Joseph G. Wolyniak & Pierre Le Coz (2012). Is There Such a Thing as Latin Bioethics? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):461-467.
    This paper reflects on the presumption that there are distinct ethical differences between the supposedly ‘Anglo-Saxon liberal’ and ‘Latin (Southern European) paternalist’ ethical traditions. The predominance of the bioethical paradigm (principalism) is measured by a comparative analysis of regional moral opinion reflected in nation-state health laws. By looking at the way the ethico-legal concept figures into various national ordinances, we attempt to ascertain the extent and nature of variation (if any) between localities by exploring the understanding and application of principalism’s (...)
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  27. Terry Carney, Culture, Community or Rights.
    This chapter reviews the extent to which laws based on promotion of individual 'autonomy' (such as durable powers of attorney) conform with the lived lives and preferences of those for whom they are designed. It considers alternative conceptions of rights, including communitarian and social citizenship models, and discusses ways in which positive rights may better promote human flourishing.
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  28. Craig L. Carr (2010). Liberalism and Pluralism: The Politics of E Pluribus Unum. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Table of Contents: Politics, morality, and pluralism -- Liberal morality and political legitimacy -- Political legitimacy and social justice -- Williams's concept of the political -- Legitimacy, stability, and morality -- The politics of morality -- A moral point of view -- Manners and morality -- Morality and conflict -- Moral conflict and political theory -- The morality of politics -- Feminism and multiculturalism -- A defense of culture -- Politics and normative conflict -- The political as moral viewpoint -- (...)
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  29. Eric Cavallero (2006). An Immigration-Pressure Model of Global Distributive Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):97-127.
    International borders concentrate opportunities in some societies while limiting them in others. Borders also prevent those in the less favored societies from gaining access to opportunities available in the more favored ones. Both distributive effects of borders are treated here within a comprehensive framework. I argue that each state should have broad discretion under international law to grant or deny entry to immigration seekers; but more favored countries that find themselves under immigration pressure should be legally obligated to fund development (...)
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  30. Alonso Cerdán, Alejandro González, Emma Verástegui & Alonso Cerdan (2013). Who Decides? The Role of the Family in the Informed Decision in Mexican Cancer Patients. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 23 (1):2-8.
    Worldwide, obtaining valid informed consent prior to carrying out medical, therapeutic, and diagnostic procedures has long been recognized as an elementary step in fulfilling the physician’s obligations towards the patient. Obtaining this consent is essential in building a successful physician-patient relationship and increases patient satisfaction and compliance with treatment. However, in Mexico, as relatives become the main decision-makers, often influenced by the family’s economic situation; the real and effective application of concepts such as informed consent and patient autonomy is questionable.Methods: (...)
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  31. Emanuela Ceva (2011). Self-Legislation, Respect and the Reconciliation of Minority Claims. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):14-28.
    It is a widely supported claim that liberal democratic institutions should treat citizens with equal respect. I neither dispute nor champion this claim, but investigate how it could be fulfilled. I do this by asking, as a sort of litmus test, how liberal democratic institutions should treat with respect citizens holding minority convictions, and thereby dissenting from a deliberative output. The first step of my argument consists in clarifying the sense in which liberal democracies have a primary concern for the (...)
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  32. Clare Chambers, Political Liberalism, Autonomy and Gender Equality.
    This paper considers the tension between political liberalism and gender equality in the light of social construction and multiculturalism. The tension is exemplified by the work of Martha Nussbaum, who tries to reconcile a belief in the universality of certain liberal values such as gender equality with a political liberal tolerance for cultural practices that violate gender equality. The paper distinguishes between first- and second-order conceptions of autonomy, and shows that political liberals mistakenly prioritise second-order autonomy. This prioritisation leads political (...)
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  33. Clare Chambers, Autonomy and Equality in Cultural Perspective: Response to Sawitri Saharso.
    In “Feminist ethics, autonomy and the politics of multiculturalism”, Sawitri Saharso argues that the feminist concern to protect women’s autonomy legitimates and permits two practices which might otherwise seem antithetical to feminism: hymen repair surgery and sex-selective abortion. Sex-selective abortion is given pragmatic support: since it is rare in the Netherlands (the focus of Saharso’s paper), and since limitations on abortion would adversely affect the autonomy of women who sought an abortion for other reasons, Saharso concludes that Dutch law ought (...)
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  34. Joseph Chan (2002). Moral Autonomy, Civil Liberties, and Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 52 (3):281-310.
    Three claims are defended. (1) There is a conception of moral autonomy in Confucian ethics that to a degree can support toleration and freedom. However, (2) Confucian moral autonomy is different from personal autonomy, and the latter gives a stronger justification for civil and personal liberties than does the former. (3) The contemporary appeal of Confucianism would be strengthened by including personal autonomy, and this need not be seen as forsaking Confucian ethics but rather as an internal revision in response (...)
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  35. Wing-Cheuk Chan (2005). Kwong-Loi Shun and David B. Wong, Eds., Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy and Community Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 25 (5):385-387.
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  36. Suhita Chatterjee (2011). Framing Post- Diagnostic Abortion in Medico Legal Language: Alternative Visions in Dialogue. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 21 (4):139-143.
    The deployment of prenatal diagnostic techniques raises complex ethical decisions which lie at the intersection of Technology, Law and Society. The paper examines socio-ethical dilemmas posed by a judgment delivered by the Mumbai High Court in 2008, denying a post-diagnostic abortion at twenty-four weeks of pregnancy. It examines the power relations and ideologies that underlie decision-making and contends that the judgment is framed in medical language without addressing moral ambiguities posed by technologies. Discourses dominated by medical language overlook both macro- (...)
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  37. X. Chen & R. Fan (2010). The Family and Harmonious Medical Decision Making: Cherishing an Appropriate Confucian Moral Balance. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):573-586.
    This essay illustrates what the Chinese family-based and harmony-oriented model of medical decision making is like as well as how it differs from the modern Western individual-based and autonomy-oriented model in health care practice. The essay discloses the roots of the Chinese model in the Confucian account of the family and the Confucian view of harmony. By responding to a series of questions posed to the Chinese model by modern Western scholars in terms of the basic individualist concerns and values (...)
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  38. F. Cheng, Mary Ip, K. K. Wong & W. W. Yan (1998). Critical Care Ethics in Hong Kong: Cross-Cultural Conflicts as East Meets West. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (6):616 – 627.
    The practice of critical care medicine has long been a difficult task for most critical care physicians in the densely populated city of Hong Kong, where we face limited resources and a limited number of intensive care beds. Our triage decisions are largely based on the potential of functional reversibility of the patients. Provision of graded care beds may help to relieve some of the demands on the intensive care beds. Decisions to forego futile medical treatment are frequently physician-guided family-based (...)
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  39. Kam-Yuen Cheng, Thomas Ming & L. A. I. Aaron (2011). Can Familism Be Justified? Bioethics 26 (8):431-439.
    This paper argues against the continued practice of Confucian familism, even in its moderate form, in East Asian hospitals. According to moderate familism, a physician acting in concert with the patient's family may withhold diagnostic information from the patient, and may give it to the patient's family members without her prior approval. There are two main approaches to defend moderate familism: one argues that it can uphold patient's autonomy and protect her best interests; the other appeals to cultural relativism by (...)
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  40. Kim-Chong Chong (2003). Autonomy in the Analects. In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court
  41. Lorraine Code (2011). A New Epistemology of Rape? Philosophical Papers 38 (3):327-345.
    In this essay I take issue with entrenched conceptions of individual autonomy for how they block understandings of the implications of rape in patriarchal cultures both 'at home' and in situations of armed conflict. I focus on human vulnerability as it manifests in sedimented assumptions about violence against women as endemic to male-female relations, thwarting possibilities of knowing the specific harms particular acts of rape enact well enough to render intelligible their far-reaching social-political-moral implications. Taking my point of departure from (...)
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  42. Andrew Jason Cohen (2007). What the Liberal State Should Tolerate Within its Borders. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):479-513.
    Two normative principles of toleration are offered, one individual-regarding, the other group-regarding. The first is John Stuart Mill’s harm principle; the other is “Principle T,” meant to be the harm principle writ large. It is argued that the state should tolerate autonomous sacrifices of autonomy, including instances where an individual rationally chooses to be enslaved, lobotomized, or killed. Consistent with that, it is argued that the state should tolerate internal restrictions within minority groups even where these prevent autonomy promotion of (...)
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  43. Maeve Cooke (2006). Salvaging and Secularizing the Semantic Contents of Religion: The Limitations of Habermas's Postmetaphysical Proposal. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):187 - 207.
    The article considers Jürgen Habermas's views on the relationship between postmetaphysical philosophy and religion. It outlines Habermas's shift from his earlier, apparently dismissive attitude towards religion to his presently more receptive stance. This more receptive stance is evident in his recent emphasis on critical engagement with the semantic contents of religion and may be characterized by two interrelated theses: (a) the view that religious contributions should be included in political deliberations in the informally organized public spheres of contemporary democracies, though (...)
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  44. Stéphane Courtois (2008). A Liberal Defence of the Intrinsic Value of Cultures. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (1):31-52.
    Over the past 15 years, a great deal of efforts have been done by political philosophers to make liberal political theory more sensitive to the importance culture has for individuals, and to think about how to translate this importance into laws and policies, in particular those affecting cultural and national minorities. However, one of the outstanding issues is whether and how an appropriate account of the worth of culture can be provided from a liberal point of view. The most important (...)
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  45. Simon Cushing, Reaching for My Gun: Why We Shouldn't Hear the Word "Culture" in Normative Political Theory. 1st Global Conference: Multiculturalism, Conflict and Belonging.
    Culture is a notoriously elusive concept. This fact has done nothing to hinder its popularity in contemporary analytic political philosophy among writers like John Rawls, Will Kymlicka, Michael Walzer, David Miller, Iris Marion Young, Joseph Raz, Avishai Margalit and Bikhu Parekh, among many others. However, this should stop, both for the metaphysical reason that the concept of culture, like that of race, is itself either incoherent or lacking a referent in reality, and for several normative reasons. I focus on the (...)
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  46. Koyeli Dastidar (1986). Sartre and Hare on Individual Autonomy. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 13 (1):59.
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  47. Koyeli Ghosh Dastidar (1987). Individual Autonomy in Traditional Indian Thought. Journal of Indian Philosophy 15 (1):99-107.
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  48. Erik W. Davis (2015). Kinship Beyond Death: Ambiguous Relations and Autonomous Children in Cambodian Buddhism. Contemporary Buddhism 16 (1):125-140.
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  49. René Firmin de Brabander (1972). Religion and Human Autonomy. The Hague,Nijhoff.
  50. Bouke De Vries, Liberalism & Internally Illiberal Minority Cultures : A Plea for a Substantive Exit Rights Strategy.
    This dissertation seeks to answer the following question: does a commitment to liberalism require state remediation of illiberal practices of illiberal minority cultures that only affect their own members? Put differently, it asks: should the state deny illiberal minority cultures such as those of the Amish, Ultra-Orthodox Jews, Pueblo Indians, et cetera the freedom to be internally illiberal from a liberal viewpoint? The answer proposed by this dissertation is a qualified ‘no’. Assuming that liberalism is fundamentally committed to the protection (...)
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