Results for 'Susan Nicolet Vineberg'

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  1.  12
    Dutch book arguments.Susan Vineberg - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  2.  24
    Confirmation and the indispensability of mathematics to science.Susan Vineberg - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (3):263.
    Quine and Putnam argued for mathematical realism on the basis of the indispensability of mathematics to science. They claimed that the mathematics that is used in physical theories is confirmed along with those theories and that scientific realism entails mathematical realism. I argue here that current theories of confirmation suggest that mathematics does not receive empirical support simply in virtue of being a part of well confirmed scientific theories and that the reasons for adopting a realist view of scientific theories (...)
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  3.  10
    The notion of consistency for partial belief.Susan Vineberg - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 102 (3):281 - 296.
  4.  3
    Is Indispensability Still a Problem for Fictionalism?Susan Vineberg - 2008 - In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Philosophy of Mathematics: Set Theory, Measuring Theories, and Nominalism. Frankfort, Germany: Ontos. pp. 132-144.
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  5.  13
    The Logical Status of Conditionalization and its Role in Confirmation.Susan Vineberg - 2000 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 71:77-94.
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  6.  8
    Dutch books, dutch strategies and what they show about rationality.Susan Vineberg - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 86 (2):185-201.
  7.  26
    Confirmation and the Indispensability of Mathematics to Science.Susan Vineberg - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (5):S256-S263.
    Quine and Putnam argued for mathematical realism on the basis of the indispensability of mathematics to science. They claimed that the mathematics that is used in physical theories is confirmed along with those theories and that scientific realism entails mathematical realism. I argue here that current theories of confirmation suggest that mathematics does not receive empirical support simply in virtue of being a part of well confirmed scientific theories and that the reasons for adopting a realist view of scientific theories (...)
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  8.  15
    Eliminative induction and bayesian confirmation theory.Susan Vineberg - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):257-66.
    In his recent book The Advancement of Science, Philip Kitcher endorses eliminative induction, or the view that confirmation of hypotheses proceeds by the elimination of alternatives. My intention here is to critically examine Kitcher's eliminativist view of confirmation, and his rejection of the widely held Bayesian position, according to which an hypothesis H is confirmed by evidence E just in case the probability of H conditional on E is greater than the simple unconditional probability of H [i.e. p > p]. (...)
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  9.  17
    Eliminative Induction and Bayesian Confirmation Theory.Susan Vineberg - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):257-266.
    In his recent bookThe Advancement of Science,Philip Kitcher endorses eliminative induction, or the view that confirmation of hypotheses proceeds by the elimination of alternatives. My intention here is to critically examine Kitcher's eliminativist view of confirmation, and his rejection of the widely held Bayesian position, according to which an hypothesis H is confirmed by evidence E just in case the probability of H conditional on E is greater than the simple unconditional probability of H [i.e. p(H/E) > p(H)]. Here, I (...)
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  10.  5
    More Precisely: The Math You Need to Do Philosophy. By Eric Steinhart.Susan Vineberg - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):161-165.
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  11.  16
    Coherence and Epistemic Rationality.Susan Vineberg - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 45:256-261.
    This paper addresses the question of whether probabilistic coherence is a requirement of rationality. The concept of probabilistic coherence is examined and compared with the familiar notion of consistency for simple beliefs. Several reasons are given for thinking rationality does not require coherence. Finally, it is argued that incoherence does not necessarily involve fallacious reasoning.
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  12.  26
    Is Indispensability Still a Problem for Fictionalism?Susan Vineberg - 2008 - ProtoSociology 25:128-139.
    For quite some time the indispensability arguments of Quine and Putnam were considered a formidable obstacle to anyone who would reject the existence of mathematical objects. Various attempts to respond to the indispensability arguments were developed, most notably by Chihara and Field. Field tried to defend mathematical fictionalism, according to which the existential assertions of mathematics are false, by showing that the mathematics used in applications is in fact dispensable. Chihara suggested, on the other hand, that mathema­tics makes true existential (...)
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  13.  24
    Mathematical explanation and indispensability.Susan Vineberg - 2018 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 33 (2):233-247.
    This paper discusses Baker’s Enhanced Indispensability Argument for mathematical realism on the basis of the indispensable role mathematics plays in scientific explanations of physical facts, along with various responses to it. I argue that there is an analogue of causal explanation for mathematics which, of several basic types of explanation, holds the most promise for use in the EIA. I consider a plausible case where mathematics plays an explanatory role in this sense, but argue that such use still does not (...)
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  14.  5
    book review Decision Space. [REVIEW]Susan Vineberg - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (3):503-506.
  15.  34
    Philosophy of Mathematics. [REVIEW]Susan Vineberg - 2004 - Philosophical Books 45 (3):277-282.
  16.  17
    Paul Weirich, Decision Space: Multidimensional Utility Analysis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press , 286 pp., $85.00. [REVIEW]Susan Vineberg - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (3):503-506.
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  17.  12
    The Curve Fitting Problem: A Bayesian Approach.Prasanta S. Bandyopadhayay, Robert J. Boik & Susan Vineberg - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (S3):S264-S272.
    In the curve fitting problem two conflicting desiderata, simplicity and goodness-of-fit, pull in opposite directions. To this problem, we propose a solution that strikes a balance between simplicity and goodness-of-fit. Using Bayes’ theorem we argue that the notion of prior probability represents a measurement of simplicity of a theory, whereas the notion of likelihood represents the theory’s goodness-of-fit. We justify the use of prior probability and show how to calculate the likelihood of a family of curves. We diagnose the relationship (...)
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  18. The Dutch Book Arguments.Richard Pettigrew - 2020 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    (This is for the series Elements of Decision Theory published by Cambridge University Press and edited by Martin Peterson) -/- Our beliefs come in degrees. I believe some things more strongly than I believe others. I believe very strongly that global temperatures will continue to rise during the coming century; I believe slightly less strongly that the European Union will still exist in 2029; and I believe much less strongly that Cardiff is east of Edinburgh. My credence in something is (...)
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  19.  8
    Mathematical Idealization.Chris Pincock - 2007 - Philosophy of Science 74 (5):957-967.
    Mathematical idealizations are scientific representations that result from assumptions that are believed to be false, and where mathematics plays a crucial role. I propose a two stage account of how to rank mathematical idealizations that is largely inspired by the semantic view of scientific theories. The paper concludes by considering how this approach to idealization allows for a limited form of scientific realism. ‡I would like to thank Robert Batterman, Gabriele Contessa, Eric Hiddleston, Nicholaos Jones, and Susan Vineberg (...)
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  20. The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability.Susan Wendell - 1996 - Routledge.
    ____The Rejected Body__ argues that feminist theorizing has been skewed toward non-disabled experience, and that the knowledge of people with disabilities must be integrated into feminist ethics, discussions of bodily life, and criticism of the cognitive and social authority of medicine. Among the topics it addresses are who should be identified as disabled; whether disability is biomedical, social or both; what causes disability and what could 'cure' it; and whether scientific efforts to eliminate disabling physical conditions are morally justified. Wendell (...)
     
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  21.  9
    Toward a Feminist Theory of Disability.Susan Wendell - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (2):104 - 124.
    We need a feminist theory of disability, both because 16 percent of women are disabled, and because the oppression of disabled people is closely linked to the cultural oppression of the body. Disability is not a biological given; like gender, it is socially constructed from biologically reality. Our culture idealizes the body and demands that we control it. Thus, although most people will be disabled at some time in their lives, the disabled are made "the other," who symbolize failure of (...)
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  22. Happiness and meaning: Two aspects of the good life.Susan Wolf - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (1):207-225.
    The topic of self-interest raises large and intractable philosophical questions–most obviously, the question “In what does self-interest consist?” The concept, as opposed to the content of self-interest, however, seems clear enough. Self-interest is interest in one's own good. To act self-interestedly is to act on the motive of advancing one's own good. Whether what one does actually is in one's self-interest depends on whether it actually does advance, or at least, minimize the decline of, one's own good. Though it may (...)
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  23.  10
    Oppression and Victimization; Choice and Responsibility.Susan Wendell - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):15 - 46.
    This essay discusses a cluster of problems for feminist theory and practice which concern responsibility and choice under conditions of oppression. I characterize four major perspectives from which situations of oppression or victimization can be seen and questions about choice and responsibility answered: The Perspective of the Oppressor; The Perspective of the Victim; The Perspective of the Responsible Actor; and The Perspective of the Observer/Philosopher. I compare their strengths and weaknesses and discuss their compatibility.
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  24.  5
    Extreme Scholastic Realism: Its Relevance to Philosophy of Science Today.Susan Haack - 1992 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (1):19 - 50.
  25. Good-for-nothings.Susan Wolf - 2010 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 85 (2):47-64.
    Many academic works as well as many works of art are such that if they had never been produced, no one would be worse off. Yet it is hard to resist the judgment that some such works are good nonetheless. We are rightly grateful that these works were created; we rightly admire them, appreciate them, and take pains to preserve them. And the authors and artists who produced them have reason to be proud. This should lead us to question the (...)
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  26. The Moral of Moral Luck.Susan Wolf - 2001 - Philosophic Exchange 31 (1).
    This essay is primarily concerned with one type of moral luck – luck in how things turn out. Do acts that actually lead to harm deserve the same treatment as similar acts that, by chance, do not lead to harm? This paper argues that we must recognize the truth in two, opposing tendencies in such cases.
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  27.  14
    Palm Beach Stories.Susan Estrich - 1992 - Law and Philosophy 11 (1/2):5 - 33.
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  28. Moral saints.Susan Wolf - 2009 - In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring ethics: an introductory anthology. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  29.  37
    Plato’s Democratic Entanglements: Athenian Politics and the Practice of Philosophy.Susan Sara Monoson - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
    In this book, Sara Monoson challenges the longstanding and widely held view that Plato is a virulent opponent of all things democratic. She does not, however, offer in its place the equally mistaken idea that he is somehow a partisan of democracy. Instead, she argues that we should attend more closely to Plato's suggestion that democracy is horrifying and exciting, and she seeks to explain why he found it morally and politically intriguing.Monoson focuses on Plato's engagement with democracy as he (...)
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  30.  3
    Epistemology with a Knowing Subject.Susan Haack - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (2):309 - 335.
    THE PRESENT paper grows out of a previous paper of mine called "Fallibilism and Necessity." That paper was primarily concerned with an issue raised by Peirce’s philosophy of mathematics: whether it is possible to hold that our mathematical beliefs are fallible, while at the same time maintaining that mathematical truths are necessary. My conclusion was that fallibilism and necessity are, in fact, perfectly compatible, once one has correctly formulated what fallibilism is: the point became clear as soon as I realized (...)
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  31.  39
    Mechanisms involved in the observational conditioning of fear.Susan Mineka & Michael Cook - 1993 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (1):23.
  32.  13
    Imagining Emotions and Appreciating Fiction.Susan L. Feagin - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):485 - 500.
    The capacity of a work of fictional literature to elicit emotional responses is part of what is valuable about it, and having emotional responses is part of appreciating it. These claims are not very controversial; perhaps they are even common sense. But philosophy rushes in where common sense fears to tread, raising questions and looking for explanations.Are the emotions we have in appreciating fictional works of art, what I call art emotions, of the same sort as those which occur in (...)
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  33.  4
    Why We Listen to Lunatics: Antifoundational Theories and Feminist Politics.Susan Bickford - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (2):104 - 123.
    In this essay, I argue that Richard Rorty's version of pragmatism focuses too much on community, and gives insufficient attention to the workings of power and the necessary relation between theory and practice. I then turn briefly to the work of Michel Foucault for a better understanding of power relations. Finally, I argue for the value of learning from a group of writers who connect theory and practice in a way that attends to both community and power relations.
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  34.  9
    Concepts of Nerve Fiber Development, 1839-1930.Susan M. Billings - 1971 - Journal of the History of Biology 4 (2):275 - 305.
    It was thus the combination of observational and experimental approaches that ultimately led to confirmation of the outgrowth theory. The observational method was essential for defining various possible methods of nerve fiber development. The multicellular, protoplasmic bridge and outgrowth theories were each postulated to explain purely observational evidence. However, the lack of truly suitable equipment and techniques to study the developing nervous system made it impossible to agree on a single theory on this basis alone. The experimental method provided a (...)
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  35.  2
    Reflections of a Critical Common-Sensist.Susan Haack - 1996 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (3):359 - 373.
  36.  7
    Impartiality in moral and political philosophy.Susan Mendus - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The debate between impartialists and their critics has dominated both moral and political philosophy for over a decade. Characteristically, impartialists argue that any sensible form of impartialism can accommodate the partial concerns we have for others. By contrast, partialists deny that this is so. They see the division as one which runs exceedingly deep and argue that, at the limit, impartialist thinking requires that we marginalise those concerns and commitments that make our lives meaningful. This book attempts to show both (...)
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  37.  12
    Lewis' Ontological Slum.Susan Haack - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):415 - 429.
    Some may be convinced that, whether or not Lewis’ defense is successful, realism about possible worlds is unavoidable if sense is to be made of modal locutions. To show that this view is—as I believe-mistaken would be a more ambitious project than I can undertake here. But some brief comments may serve to show how extreme a view this is. If one rejects realism about possible worlds, one has at least these options: to accept that conventional modal logic can be (...)
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  38.  3
    A Sorry Tail: Ability, Pedagogy and Educational Reform.Susan Hart - 1998 - British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):153 - 168.
    This paper argues that if 'reforms' of education designed to raise standards leave unquestioned the notion of fixed differential ability, then they are likely to be self-defeating. It considers alternative ways of formulating knowledge about individual differences reflected both in the literature and in classroom practice, and concludes by making a case for further research to be undertaken to establish frameworks for teaching consistent with an anti-determinist view of individual potential.
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  39.  2
    Peirce and Logicism: Notes Towards an Exposition.Susan Haack - 1993 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (1):33 - 56.
  40.  1
    Philosophy/philosophy, an Untenable Dualism.Susan Haack - 1993 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (3):411 - 426.
  41.  84
    The relational self: An interpersonal social-cognitive theory.Susan M. Andersen & Serena Chen - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (4):619-645.
  42. Impartiality in Moral and Political Philosophy.Susan Mendus - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (216):484-487.
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  43. Character and Responsibility.Susan Wolf - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy 112 (7):356-372.
    Many philosophers have been persuaded that if we don’t create our own characters, we cannot be responsible for acts that flow from our characters; they also raise doubts about whether acts that do not flow from our characters can fairly be attributed to us. Both these concerns, however, reflect a simplistic and implausible conception of character and of its relation to our actions and our selves. I suggest a different relationship between character and responsibility: We can be responsible for acts (...)
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  44. 'One Thought Too Many': Love, Morality, and the Ordering of.Susan Wolf - 2012 - In Ulrike Heuer & Gerald Lang (eds.), Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes From the Ethics of Bernard Williams. Oxford University Press, Usa. pp. 71.
  45.  18
    Health Care Reform and the Future of Physician Ethics.Susan M. Wolf - 1994 - Hastings Center Report 24 (2):28-41.
    Health care reform proposals threaten to exacerbate tensions physicians already face in trying to balance traditional duties to individual patients against increasing pressure to serve broader societal and institutional goals. To cope with reform, medical ethics must clarify physicians' moral obligations, change existing ethical codes, and develop an ethics of institutions.
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  46. One thought too many: love, morality, and the ordering of commitment.Susan Wolf - 2012 - In Ulrike Heuer & Gerald R. Lang (eds.), Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes From the Ethics of Bernard Williams. Oxford University Press, Usa.
  47.  6
    Feminism and emotion: readings in moral and political philosophy.Susan Mendus - 2000 - Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: St. Martin's Press.
    This book combines the insights of enlightenment thinking and feminist theory to explore the significance of love in modern philosophy. The author argues for the importance of emotion in general, and love in particular, to moral and political philosophy, pointing out that some of the central philosophers of the enlightment were committed to a moralized conception of love. However, she believes that feminism's insights arise not from its attribution of special and distinctive qualities to women, but from its recognition of (...)
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  48. The Electromagnetic Field Theory of Consciousness.Susan Pockett - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (11-12):191-223.
    The electromagnetic field theory of consciousness proposes that conscious experiences are identical with certain electromagnetic patterns generated by the brain. While the theory has always acknowledged that not all of the electromagnetic patterns generated by brain activity are conscious, until now it has not been able to specify what might distinguish conscious patterns from non-conscious patterns. Here a hypothesis is proposed about the 3D shape of electromagnetic fields that are conscious, as opposed to those that are not conscious. Seven predictions (...)
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  49.  2
    Can James's Theory of Truth Be Made More Satisfactory?Susan Haack - 1984 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 20 (3):269 - 278.
  50.  3
    Two Fallibilists in Search of the Truth.Susan Haack & Konstantin Kolenda - 1977 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 51 (1):63 - 104.
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