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  1. Kunst. Werkästhetik als Ereignisästhetik.Emmanuel Alloa - 2013 - In Dieter Thomä (ed.), Heidegger-Handbuch: Leben - Werk – Wirkung. Metzler. pp. 315-319.
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  2. On Doing Without Events.Andrew Altman, Michael Bradie & Fred D. Miller - 1979 - Philosophical Studies 36 (3):301 - 307.
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  3. Complicated Presence: Heidegger and the Postmetaphysical Unity of Being.Jussi Backman - 2015 - State University of New York Press.
    From its Presocratic beginnings, Western philosophy concerned itself with a quest for unity both in terms of the systematization of knowledge and as a metaphysical search for a unity of being—two trends that can be regarded as converging and culminating in Hegel’s system of absolute idealism. Since Hegel, however, the philosophical quest for unity has become increasingly problematic. Jussi Backman returns to that question in this book, examining the place of the unity of being in the work of Heidegger. Backman (...)
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  4. Olemisen kontekstuaalisuus Heideggerin jälkimetafysiikassa.Jussi Backman - 2011 - Ajatus 68:201-242.
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  5. Effects of Divided Attention on Free and Cued Recall of Verbal Events and Action Events.Lars BÄckman & Lars-GÖran Nilsson - 1991 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (1):51-54.
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  6. A Hermeneutic Phenomenology: The Death of the Other Understood as Event.Harris B. Bechtol - 2017 - Journal of Applied Hermeneutics 1:1-14.
    This is a phenomenological description of what is happening when we experience the death of another that interprets surviving or living on after such death by employing the term event. This term of art from phenomenology and hermeneutics is used to describe a disruptive and transformative experience of singularity. I maintain that the death of the other is an experience of an event because such death is unpredictable or without a horizon of expectation, excessive or without any principle of sufficient (...)
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  7. The Plural Event: Descartes, Hegel, Heidegger.Andrew Benjamin - 1993 - Routledge.
    Benjamin provides new and important readings of key canonical texts in the history of philosophy in his sustained philosophical reworking of ontology. Amongst texts included are Hegel's _Difference Essay_ and the _Shorter Logic_ and Heidegger's _Time and Being_ and _The Question of Being_. The effective presence of ontology, defined as `an original difference', will be familiar to readers of his earlier writings. This book represents his most thorough and original contribution to contemporary philosophy to date.
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  8. What Events Are.Jonathan Bennett - 2002 - In Richard M. Gale (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Metaphysics. Blackwell. pp. 43.
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  9. Events and Their Names.Jonathan Bennett - 1988 - Hackett.
    Various as these are, they have enough in common for them all to count as events, and in recent years philosophers have turned their attention to this..
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  10. What Causally Insensitive Events Tell Us About Overdetermination.Sara Bernstein - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (4):1-18.
    Suppose that Billy and Suzy each throw a rock at window, and either rock is sufficient to shatter the window. While some consider this a paradigmatic case of causal overdetermination, in which multiple cases are sufficient for an outcome, others consider it a case of joint causation, in which multiple causes are necessary to bring about an effect. Some hold that every case of overdetermination is a case of joint causation underdescribed: at a maximal level of description, every cause is (...)
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  11. Event Location and Vagueness.Andrea Borghini & Achille C. Varzi - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 128 (2):313-336.
    Most event-referring expressions are vague; it is utterly difficult, if not impossible, to specify the exact spatiotemporal location of an event from the words that we use to refer to it. We argue that in spite of certain prima facie obstacles, such vagueness can be given a purely semantic (broadly supervaluational) account.
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  12. Supplementary Report: The Utility of Correctly Predicting Infrequent Events.Yvonne Brackbill & Anthony Bravos - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (6):648.
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  13. Recent Work on Criteria for Event Identity, 1967-1979.Michael Bradie - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:29-77.
    The paper reviews the arguments for and against a number of criteria for event identity. The proliferation of such criteria in the 1970’s raises the question of how one is to choose between them. Eight adequacy conditions, whose own adequacy has been argued for elsewhere, are determined to be insufticient for deciding among the criteria. Some concluding remarks about the role of the adequacy conditions and the problem of choosing a criterion are offered. Finally, questions about the nature of and (...)
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  14. Adequacy Conditions and Event Identity.Michael Bradie - 1981 - Synthese 49 (3):337 - 374.
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  15. Events: A Metaphysical Study. [REVIEW]Myles Brand - 1989 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (3).
    I EXISTENTIAL PROOFS INTRODUCTION Metaphysical problems, like all philosophical problems, arise from a sense of puzzlement. What is puzzling is that the ...
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  16. A Particularist Theory of Events.Myles Brand - 1981 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 12:187-202.
    Events are unstructured particulars and their identity conditions are to be stated in terms of necessary spatiotemporal coincidence. In contrast, Davidson says that events are unstructured particulars, with their identity conditions to be given in terms of sameness of causes and effects; and Kim says that events are structured particulars, with their identity conditions to be given in terms of sameness of their constituents. The consequences of my view are then traced for mental events.
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  17. On Tye's 'Brand on Event Identity'.Myles Brand - 1979 - Philosophical Studies 36 (1):61 - 68.
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  18. Identity Conditions for Events.Myles Brand - 1977 - American Philosophical Quarterly 14 (4):329 - 337.
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  19. Do Events Recur?J. Brandl - 2000 - In Achille Varzi, James Higginbotham & Fabio Pianesi (eds.), Speaking of Events. Oxford University Press. pp. 95--104.
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  20. An Inchoate Universe: James's Probabilistic Underdeterminism.Kyle Bromhall - 2018 - William James Studies 14 (1):54-83.
    In this paper, I challenge the traditional narrative that William James’s arguments against determinism were primarily motivated by his personal struggles with depression. I argue that James presents an alternative argument against determinism that is motivated by his commitment to sound scientific practice. James argues that determinism illegitimately extrapolates from observations of past events to predictions about future events without acknowledging the distinct metaphysical difference between them. This occupation with futurity suggests that James’s true target is better understood as logical (...)
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  21. Exact Philosophy; Problems, Tools, and Goals.Mario Augusto Bunge (ed.) - 1973 - Boston: D. Reidel.
  22. The Eucharistic Conquest of Time.Pavel Butakov - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (3):247-271.
    Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox theologians claim that the unique event of Christ’s sacrifice on Calvary is present in Eucharistic liturgies. A popular explanatory strategy for this miraculous presence suggests that due to its supernatural character the Eucharist “conquers time,” transcends its boundaries, and allows for temporal coincidence of two chronologically distant events. I discuss the four main approaches within this strategy that can be discovered in contemporary theological writings. The first approach implies a time travel of the Calvary event. (...)
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  23. Causation, Supervenience, and Method. Reflections on Jonathan Bennett's Events and Their Names.Keith Campbell - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (3):637-640.
  24. On Transworld Event Identity.W. R. Carter - 1979 - Philosophical Review 88 (3):443-452.
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  25. Events.Roberto Casati & Achille C. Varzi - 2014 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    A critical survey of the main philosophical theories about events and event talk, organized in three main sections: (i) Events and Other Categories (Events vs. Objects; Events vs. Facts; Events vs. Properties; Events vs. Times); (ii) Types of Events (Activities, Accomplishments, Achievements, and States; Static and Dynamic Events; Actions and Bodily Movements; Mental and Physical Events; Negative Events); (iii) Existence, Identity, and Indeterminacy.
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  26. Event Concepts.Roberto Casati & Achille C. Varzi - 2007 - In Thomas F. Shipley & Jeff Zacks (eds.), Understanding Events: From Perception to Action. Oxford University Press. pp. 31�54.
    Events are center stage in several fields of psychological research. There is a long tradition in the study of event perception, event recognition, event memory, event conceptualization and segmentation. There are studies devoted to the description of events in language and to their representation in the brain. There are also metapsychological studies aimed at assessing the nature of mental events or the grounding of intentional action. Outside psychology, the notion of an event plays a prominent role in various areas of (...)
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  27. Foreword to ''Lesser Kinds''.Roberto Casati & Achille C. Varzi - 2007 - The Monist 90 (3):331-332.
    This issue of The Monist is devoted to the metaphysics of lesser kinds, which is to say those kinds of entity that are not generally recognized as occupying a prominent position in the categorial structure of the world. Why bother? We offer two sorts of reason. The first is methodological. In mathematics, it is common practice to study certain functions (for instance) by considering limit cases: What if x = 0? What if x is larger than any assigned value? Physics, (...)
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  28. 50 Years of Events an Annotated Bibliography, 1947 to 1997.Roberto Casati & Achille C. Varzi - 1997 - Philosophy Documentation Center.
    This major bibliography offers a comprehensive overview of the recent literature on the nature of events and the place they occupy in our conceptual scheme. The subject has received extensive consideration in the philosophical debate over the last few decades, with ramifications reaching far into the domains of allied disciplines such as linguistics and the cognitive sciences. The starting point for this work is Hans Reichenbach's pioneering contribution on the logical form of action sentences, and the broad scope includes entries (...)
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  29. Power and Events.Roderick M. Chisholm & Andrew Paul Ushenko - 1947 - Philosophical Review 56 (4):431.
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  30. Merleau-Ponty and the Order of the Earth.Frank Chouraqui - 2016 - Research in Phenomenology 46 (1):54-69.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 54 - 69 In this essay, I reconstruct Merleau-Ponty’s implicit critique of Husserl in his lectures on Husserl’s concept of the earth as _Boden_ or ground. Against Husserl, Merleau-Ponty regards the earth seen as pure _Boden_ as an idealization. He emphasizes the ontological necessity for the earth as _Boden_ to always hypostasize itself into the Copernican concept of earth as object. In turn, Merleau-Ponty builds this necessity into an essential feature of being, allowing (...)
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  31. Catalytic Events: Environmental Events That Transform Institutions.Ken Chung - unknown
    Some environmentally disastrous events lead to significant institutional change while others do not. Consider that the volume of oil spilt at Guadalupe Dunes, California was twice that of the Exxon Valdez accident. Few have heard of the former while the latter has led to significant legislation to control oil pollution. Organizational institutionalists are ambivalent about why events lead to change or even whether they do. Some theorists argue that shocking events break the status quo but what constitutes shocking is unclear. (...)
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  32. Power and Events.Joseph T. Clark - 1947 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 22 (3):533-538.
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  33. The Idea of God in a Philosophy of Events.William F. Clarke - 1928 - The Monist 38 (4):620-629.
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  34. Russell and the Temporal Contiguity of Causes and Effects.Graham Clay - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    There are some necessary conditions on causal relations that seem to be so trivial that they do not merit further inquiry. Many philosophers assume that the requirement that there could be no temporal gaps between causes and their effects is such a condition. Bertrand Russell disagrees. In this paper, an in-depth discussion of Russell’s argument against this necessary condition is the centerpiece of an analysis of what is at stake when one accepts or denies that there can be temporal gaps (...)
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  35. The Greatest Events.William E. Connolly - 2000 - Theory and Event 4 (3).
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  36. The Transcendentist Theory of Persistence.Damiano Costa - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy 114 (2):57-75.
    This paper develops an endurantist theory of persistence. The theory is built around one basic tenet, which concerns existence at a time – the relation between an object and the times at which that object is present. According to this tenet, which I call transcendentism, for an object to exist at a time is for it to participate in events that are located at that time. I argue that transcendentism is a semantically grounded and metaphysically fruitful. It is semantically grounded, (...)
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  37. Seeing and Other Complex Events.Michael John Costa - 1981 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
    The dissertation begins by explaining the author's motivation in developing a theory of events. A theory of events is desirable, not only for its intrinsic metaphysical interest, but also in order to provide the resources needed to resolve a wide range of philosophic problems. With this motivation in mind, it is argued that the Alvin Goldman/Jaegwon Kim view of events as property exemplifications at times provides the best starting point for the development of the theory. The Goldman/Kim view of events (...)
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  38. Why Objects Exist but Events Occur.M. J. Cresswell - 1986 - Studia Logica 45 (4):371 - 375.
    I distinguish between sentences like(1) Last Thursday we drove from Wellington to Waikanae and (2) Last Thursday my copy of Aspects of the Theory of Syntax remained on my bookshelf. Sentence (2) has the subinterval property. If it is true at an interval t it is true at every subinterval of t. (1) lacks this property. (1) reports an event. (2) reports a state. Events do not have the subinterval property but states do have it, and so do objects. If (...)
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  39. The Nature of Events.Judith Worth Cross - 2000 - Dissertation, University of California, Davis
    My dissertation is an investigation into the nature of events. I first argue that we need a clearer account of events in order to facilitate philosophical discussion of many phenomena that make use of the notion of events. For example, since events are thought to be causal relata, we cannot specify the truth conditions for causal claims without first laying out a clear account of the essential characteristics of events. With that in mind I discuss what characteristics events have, and (...)
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  40. The Matter of Events.Thomas Crowther - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (1):3- 39.
    A distinction has often been drawn between processes and accomplishments; between, say, *walking* and *walking to the shops*. But it has proved difficult to explain the nature of this distinction in a satisfying way. This paper offers an explanation of the nature of this distinction that is suggested by the idea that there is an ontologically significant correspondence between temporal and spatial notions. A number of writers, such as Alexander Mourelatos (1978) and Barry Taylor (1985), have argued that the spatial (...)
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  41. L’avance de l’avenir.Anna Caterina Dalmasso - 2016 - Cités 66 (2):169.
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  42. Do Events Have Their Parts Essentially?Paul R. Daniels & Dana Goswick - 2017 - Acta Analytica 32 (3):313-320.
    We argue that mereological essentialism for events is independent of mereological essentialism for objects, and that the philosophical fallout of embracing mereological essentialism for events is minimal. We first outline what we should consider to be the parts of events, and then highlight why one would naturally be inclined to think that the object-question and the event-question are linked. Then, we argue that they are not. We also diagnose why this is the case and emphasize the upshot. In particular, we (...)
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  43. Complex Events.Arthur C. Danto - 1969 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 30 (1):66-77.
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  44. Events and Particulars.Donald Davidson - 1970 - Noûs 4 (1):25-32.
  45. On Events and Event-Descriptions.Donald Davidson - 1969 - In Joseph Margolis (ed.), Fact and Existence. Blackwell. pp. 74--84.
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  46. Is There a Problem with the Causal Criterion of Event Identity?Rafael De Clercq, Wai-Yin Lam & Jiji Zhang - 2014 - American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (2):109-119.
    In this paper, we take another look at the reasons for which the causal criterion of event identity has been abandoned. We argue that the reasons are not strong. First of all, there is a criterion in the neighborhood of the causal criterion—the counterfactual criterion—that is not vulnerable to any of the putative counterexamples brought up in the literature. Secondly, neither the causal criterion nor the counterfactual criterion suffers from any form of vicious circularity. Nonetheless, we do not recommend adopting (...)
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  47. The Existence of the Past.Joseph Diekemper - 2014 - Synthese 191 (6):1085-1104.
    My goal in this paper is to address what I call the ‘Incoherence’ objection to the growing universe theory of time. At the root of the objection is the thought that one cannot wed objective temporal becoming with the existence of a tenseless past—which is apparently what the growing universe theorist tries to do. To do so, however, is to attribute both dynamic and static aspects to time, and, given the mutual exclusivity of these two aspects—so the thought goes—incoherence results. (...)
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  48. Thisness and Events.Joseph Diekemper - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (5):255-276.
    This essay is an investigation into the existence of a very unusual and some would say unacceptably exotic type of property: namely, the property of being a certain individual; or, if you prefer, the property of being identical to a certain individual. In other words, this essay will investigate whether in spite of their exotic nature there are thisnesses, and, in particular, whether thisnesses are instantiated by events. Of course, I have not really said enough yet about thisnesses to motivate (...)
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  49. Events and the Ontology of Quantum Mechanics.Mauro Dorato - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):369-378.
    In the first part of the paper I argue that an ontology of events is precise, flexible and general enough so as to cover the three main alternative formulations of quantum mechanics as well as theories advocating an antirealistic view of the wave function. Since these formulations advocate a primitive ontology of entities living in four-dimensional spacetime, they are good candidates to connect that quantum image with the manifest image of the world. However, to the extent that some form of (...)
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  50. A Special Davidsonian Theory of Events.Keith Douglas - unknown
    What is an event? What sort of object are they? How is a given event distinguished from other events and other objects? This thesis on science oriented metaphysics will take Davidson's account of events as its starting point to answer the above questions. It will develop this conception of events into one that is consistent with the special theory of relativity by updating its notions of change, cause and property. The new concept of a proper property, a generalization of the (...)
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