Results for 'Zach Blaesi'

166 found
Order:
See also
Zach Blaesi
University of Texas at Austin (PhD)
  1. The Moral Parody Argument Against Panpsychism.Zach Blaesi - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
    I exploit parallel considerations in the philosophy of mind and metaethics to argue that the reasoning employed in an important argument for panpsychism overgeneralizes to support an analogous position in metaethics: panmoralism. Next, I raise a number of problems for panmoralism and thereby build a case for taking the metaethical parallel to be a reductio ad absurdum of the argument for panpsychism. Finally, I contrast panmoralism with a position recently defended by Einar Duenger Bohn and argue that the two suffer (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Why You Should Vote to Change the Outcome.Zach Barnett - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (4):422-446.
    Prevailing opinion—defended by Jason Brennan and others—is that voting to change the outcome is irrational, since although the payoffs of tipping an election can be quite large, the probability of doing so is extraordinarily small. This paper argues that prevailing opinion is incorrect. Voting is shown to be rational so long as two conditions are satisfied: First, the average social benefit of electing the better candidate must be at least twice as great as the individual cost of voting, and second, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3. Belief Dependence: How Do the Numbers Count?Zach Barnett - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (2):297-319.
    This paper is about how to aggregate outside opinion. If two experts are on one side of an issue, while three experts are on the other side, what should a non-expert believe? Certainly, the non-expert should take into account more than just the numbers. But which other factors are relevant, and why? According to the view developed here, one important factor is whether the experts should have been expected, in advance, to reach the same conclusion. When the agreement of two (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. No Free Lunch: The Significance of Tiny Contributions.Zach Barnett - 2018 - Analysis 78 (1):3-13.
    There is a well-known moral quandary concerning how to account for the rightness or wrongness of acts that clearly contribute to some morally significant outcome – but which each seem too small, individually, to make any meaningful difference. One consequentialist-friendly response to this problem is to deny that there could ever be a case of this type. This paper pursues this general strategy, but in an unusual way. Existing arguments for the consequentialist-friendly position are sorites-style arguments. Such arguments imagine varying (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5. Philosophy Without Belief.Zach Barnett - 2019 - Mind 128 (509):109-138.
    Should we believe our controversial philosophical views? Recently, several authors have argued from broadly conciliationist premises that we should not. If they are right, we philosophers face a dilemma: If we believe our views, we are irrational. If we do not, we are not sincere in holding them. This paper offers a way out, proposing an attitude we can rationally take toward our views that can support sincerity of the appropriate sort. We should arrive at our views via a certain (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  6. Rational Moral Ignorance.Zach Barnett - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 102 (3):645-664.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Conciliationism and Merely Possible Disagreement.Zach Barnett & Han Li - 2016 - Synthese 193 (9):1-13.
    Conciliationism faces a challenge that has not been satisfactorily addressed. There are clear cases of epistemically significant merely possible disagreement, but there are also clear cases where merely possible disagreement is epistemically irrelevant. Conciliationists have not yet accounted for this asymmetry. In this paper, we propose that the asymmetry can be explained by positing a selection constraint on all cases of peer disagreement—whether actual or merely possible. If a peer’s opinion was not selected in accordance with the proposed constraint, then (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8.  48
    Does Suffering Dominate Enjoyment in the Animal Kingdom? An Update to Welfare Biology.Zach Groff & Yew-Kwang Ng - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (4):40.
    Ng :255–285, 1995. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00852469) models the evolutionary dynamics underlying the existence of suffering and enjoyment and concludes that there is likely to be more suffering than enjoyment in nature. In this paper, we find an error in Ng’s model that, when fixed, negates the original conclusion. Instead, the model offers only ambiguity as to whether suffering or enjoyment predominates in nature. We illustrate the dynamics around suffering and enjoyment with the most plausible parameters. In our illustration, we find surprising results: (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Vagueness, Logic and Use: Four Experimental Studies on Vagueness.Phil Serchuk, Ian Hargreaves & Richard Zach - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (5):540-573.
    Although arguments for and against competing theories of vagueness often appeal to claims about the use of vague predicates by ordinary speakers, such claims are rarely tested. An exception is Bonini et al. (1999), who report empirical results on the use of vague predicates by Italian speakers, and take the results to count in favor of epistemicism. Yet several methodological difficulties mar their experiments; we outline these problems and devise revised experiments that do not show the same results. We then (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  10.  48
    No Evidence of Intelligence Improvement After Working Memory Training: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.Thomas S. Redick, Zach Shipstead, Tyler L. Harrison, Kenny L. Hicks, David E. Fried, David Z. Hambrick, Michael J. Kane & Randall W. Engle - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):359.
  11. Tolerance and the Distributed Sorites.Zach Barnett - 2019 - Synthese 196 (3):1071-1077.
    On some accounts of vagueness, predicates like “is a heap” are tolerant. That is, their correct application tolerates sufficiently small changes in the objects to which they are applied. Of course, such views face the sorites paradox, and various solutions have been proposed. One proposed solution involves banning repeated appeals to tolerance, while affirming tolerance in any individual case. In effect, this solution rejects the reasoning of the sorites argument. This paper discusses a thorny problem afflicting this approach to vagueness. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Transfinite Numbers in Paraconsistent Set Theory.Zach Weber - 2010 - Review of Symbolic Logic 3 (1):71-92.
    This paper begins an axiomatic development of naive set theoryin a paraconsistent logic. Results divide into two sorts. There is classical recapture, where the main theorems of ordinal and Peano arithmetic are proved, showing that naive set theory can provide a foundation for standard mathematics. Then there are major extensions, including proofs of the famous paradoxes and the axiom of choice (in the form of the well-ordering principle). At the end I indicate how later developments of cardinal numbers will lead (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  13. Transfinite Cardinals in Paraconsistent Set Theory.Zach Weber - 2012 - Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (2):269-293.
    This paper develops a (nontrivial) theory of cardinal numbers from a naive set comprehension principle, in a suitable paraconsistent logic. To underwrite cardinal arithmetic, the axiom of choice is proved. A new proof of Cantor’s theorem is provided, as well as a method for demonstrating the existence of large cardinals by way of a reflection theorem.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  14.  32
    Hilbert's 'Verunglückter Beweis', the First Epsilon Theorem, and Consistency Proofs.Richard Zach - 2004 - History and Philosophy of Logic 25 (2):79-94.
    In the 1920s, Ackermann and von Neumann, in pursuit of Hilbert's programme, were working on consistency proofs for arithmetical systems. One proposed method of giving such proofs is Hilbert's epsilon-substitution method. There was, however, a second approach which was not reflected in the publications of the Hilbert school in the 1920s, and which is a direct precursor of Hilbert's first epsilon theorem and a certain "general consistency result" due to Bernays. An analysis of the form of this so-called "failed proof" (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  15. A Topological Sorites.Zach Weber & Mark Colyvan - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (6):311-325.
    This paper considers a generalisation of the sorites paradox, in which only topological notions are employed. We argue that by increasing the level of abstraction in this way, we see the sorites paradox in a new, more revealing light—a light that forces attention on cut-off points of vague predicates. The generalised sorites paradox presented here also gives rise to a new, more tractable definition of vagueness.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  16.  74
    What Is an Inconsistent Truth Table?Zach Weber, Guillermo Badia & Patrick Girard - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):533-548.
    ABSTRACTDo truth tables—the ordinary sort that we use in teaching and explaining basic propositional logic—require an assumption of consistency for their construction? In this essay we show that truth tables can be built in a consistency-independent paraconsistent setting, without any appeal to classical logic. This is evidence for a more general claim—that when we write down the orthodox semantic clauses for a logic, whatever logic we presuppose in the background will be the logic that appears in the foreground. Rather than (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  17. Completeness Before Post: Bernays, Hilbert, and the Development of Propositional Logic.Richard Zach - 1999 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 5 (3):331-366.
    Some of the most important developments of symbolic logic took place in the 1920s. Foremost among them are the distinction between syntax and semantics and the formulation of questions of completeness and decidability of logical systems. David Hilbert and his students played a very important part in these developments. Their contributions can be traced to unpublished lecture notes and other manuscripts by Hilbert and Bernays dating to the period 1917-1923. The aim of this paper is to describe these results, focussing (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  18. The Practice of Finitism: Epsilon Calculus and Consistency Proofs in Hilbert's Program.Richard Zach - 2003 - Synthese 137 (1-2):211 - 259.
    After a brief flirtation with logicism around 1917, David Hilbertproposed his own program in the foundations of mathematics in 1920 and developed it, in concert with collaborators such as Paul Bernays andWilhelm Ackermann, throughout the 1920s. The two technical pillars of the project were the development of axiomatic systems for everstronger and more comprehensive areas of mathematics, and finitisticproofs of consistency of these systems. Early advances in these areaswere made by Hilbert (and Bernays) in a series of lecture courses atthe (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  19. The Epsilon Calculus and Herbrand Complexity.Georg Moser & Richard Zach - 2006 - Studia Logica 82 (1):133-155.
    Hilbert's ε-calculus is based on an extension of the language of predicate logic by a term-forming operator εx. Two fundamental results about the ε-calculus, the first and second epsilon theorem, play a rôle similar to that which the cut-elimination theorem plays in sequent calculus. In particular, Herbrand's Theorem is a consequence of the epsilon theorems. The paper investigates the epsilon theorems and the complexity of the elimination procedure underlying their proof, as well as the length of Herbrand disjunctions of existential (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  20.  88
    Extensionality and Restriction in Naive Set Theory.Zach Weber - 2010 - Studia Logica 94 (1):87-104.
    The naive set theory problem is to begin with a full comprehension axiom, and to find a logic strong enough to prove theorems, but weak enough not to prove everything. This paper considers the sub-problem of expressing extensional identity and the subset relation in paraconsistent, relevant solutions, in light of a recent proposal from Beall, Brady, Hazen, Priest and Restall [4]. The main result is that the proposal, in the context of an independently motivated formalization of naive set theory, leads (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  21.  58
    A Note on Contraction-Free Logic for Validity.Colin R. Caret & Zach Weber - 2015 - Topoi 34 (1):63-74.
    This note motivates a logic for a theory that can express its own notion of logical consequence—a ‘syntactically closed’ theory of naive validity. The main issue for such a logic is Curry’s paradox, which is averted by the failure of contraction. The logic features two related, but different, implication connectives. A Hilbert system is proposed that is complete and non-trivial.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  22.  62
    Naive Validity.Zach Weber - 2014 - Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):99-114.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  23. Hilbert’s Program.Richard Zach - 2003 - In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. The Metaphysics Research Lab, Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University.
    In the early 1920s, the German mathematician David Hilbert (1862–1943) put forward a new proposal for the foundation of classical mathematics which has come to be known as Hilbert's Program. It calls for a formalization of all of mathematics in axiomatic form, together with a proof that this axiomatization of mathematics is consistent. The consistency proof itself was to be carried out using only what Hilbert called “finitary” methods. The special epistemological character of finitary reasoning then yields the required justification (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  24. The Development of Mathematical Logic From Russell to Tarski, 1900-1935.Paolo Mancosu, Richard Zach & Calixto Badesa - 2009 - In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press.
    The period from 1900 to 1935 was particularly fruitful and important for the development of logic and logical metatheory. This survey is organized along eight "itineraries" concentrating on historically and conceptually linked strands in this development. Itinerary I deals with the evolution of conceptions of axiomatics. Itinerary II centers on the logical work of Bertrand Russell. Itinerary III presents the development of set theory from Zermelo onward. Itinerary IV discusses the contributions of the algebra of logic tradition, in particular, Löwenheim (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  25.  84
    Inconsistent Boundaries.Zach Weber & A. J. Cotnoir - 2015 - Synthese 192 (5):1267-1294.
    Mereotopology is a theory of connected parts. The existence of boundaries, as parts of everyday objects, is basic to any such theory; but in classical mereotopology, there is a problem: if boundaries exist, then either distinct entities cannot be in contact, or else space is not topologically connected . In this paper we urge that this problem can be met with a paraconsistent mereotopology, and sketch the details of one such approach. The resulting theory focuses attention on the role of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  26.  30
    Modal Logic Without Contraction in a Metatheory Without Contraction.Patrick Girard & Zach Weber - 2019 - Review of Symbolic Logic 12 (4):685-701.
    Standard reasoning about Kripke semantics for modal logic is almost always based on a background framework of classical logic. Can proofs for familiar definability theorems be carried out using a nonclassical substructural logic as the metatheory? This article presents a semantics for positive substructural modal logic and studies the connection between frame conditions and formulas, via definability theorems. The novelty is that all the proofs are carried out with a noncontractive logic in the background. This sheds light on which modal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Tolerating Gluts.Zach Weber, David Ripley, Graham Priest, Dominic Hyde & Mark Colyvan - 2014 - Mind 123 (491):813-828.
  28. Fool Me Once: Can Indifference Vindicate Induction?Zach Barnett & Han Li - 2018 - Episteme 15 (2):202-208.
    Roger White (2015) sketches an ingenious new solution to the problem of induction. He argues from the principle of indifference for the conclusion that the world is more likely to be induction- friendly than induction-unfriendly. But there is reason to be skeptical about the proposed indifference-based vindication of induction. It can be shown that, in the crucial test cases White concentrates on, the assumption of indifference renders induction no more accurate than random guessing. After discussing this result, the paper explains (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  17
    Game Theory in Evolutionary Biology.Zach Ernst - 2009 - In Michael Ruse (ed.), Philosophy After Darwin: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Princeton University Press. pp. 464.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  62
    First-Order Gödel Logics.Richard Zach, Matthias Baaz & Norbert Preining - 2007 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 147 (1):23-47.
    First-order Gödel logics are a family of finite- or infinite-valued logics where the sets of truth values V are closed subsets of [0,1] containing both 0 and 1. Different such sets V in general determine different Gödel logics GV (sets of those formulas which evaluate to 1 in every interpretation into V). It is shown that GV is axiomatizable iff V is finite, V is uncountable with 0 isolated in V, or every neighborhood of 0 in V is uncountable. Complete (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  31.  17
    Cognitive Predictors of a Common Multitasking Ability: Contributions From Working Memory, Attention Control, and Fluid Intelligence.Thomas S. Redick, Zach Shipstead, Matthew E. Meier, Janelle J. Montroy, Kenny L. Hicks, Nash Unsworth, Michael J. Kane, D. Zachary Hambrick & Randall W. Engle - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (11):1473-1492.
  32.  91
    Proof Theory of Finite-Valued Logics.Richard Zach - 1993 - Dissertation, Technische Universität Wien
    The proof theory of many-valued systems has not been investigated to an extent comparable to the work done on axiomatizatbility of many-valued logics. Proof theory requires appropriate formalisms, such as sequent calculus, natural deduction, and tableaux for classical (and intuitionistic) logic. One particular method for systematically obtaining calculi for all finite-valued logics was invented independently by several researchers, with slight variations in design and presentation. The main aim of this report is to develop the proof theory of finite-valued first order (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  33.  77
    Real Analysis in Paraconsistent Logic.Maarten McKubre-Jordens & Zach Weber - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (5):901-922.
    This paper begins an analysis of the real line using an inconsistency-tolerant (paraconsistent) logic. We show that basic field and compactness properties hold, by way of novel proofs that make no use of consistency-reliant inferences; some techniques from constructive analysis are used instead. While no inconsistencies are found in the algebraic operations on the real number field, prospects for other non-trivializing contradictions are left open.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  34. Hilbert's Program Then and Now.Richard Zach - 2007 - In Dale Jacquette (ed.), Philosophy of Logic. Amsterdam: North Holland. pp. 411–447.
    Hilbert’s program was an ambitious and wide-ranging project in the philosophy and foundations of mathematics. In order to “dispose of the foundational questions in mathematics once and for all,” Hilbert proposed a two-pronged approach in 1921: first, classical mathematics should be formalized in axiomatic systems; second, using only restricted, “finitary” means, one should give proofs of the consistency of these axiomatic systems. Although Gödel’s incompleteness theorems show that the program as originally conceived cannot be carried out, it had many partial (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  35.  73
    Bad Worlds.Patrick Girard & Zach Weber - 2015 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):93-101.
    The idea of relevant logic—that irrelevant inferences are invalid—is appealing. But the standard semantics for relevant logics involve baroque metaphysics: a three-place accessibility relation, a star operator, and ‘bad’ worlds. In this article we propose that these oddities express a mismatch between non-classical object theory and classical metatheory. A uniformly relevant semantics for relevant logic is a better fit.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  62
    Carnap’s Early Metatheory: Scope and Limits.Georg Schiemer, Richard Zach & Erich Reck - 2017 - Synthese 194 (1):33-65.
    In Untersuchungen zur allgemeinen Axiomatik and Abriss der Logistik, Carnap attempted to formulate the metatheory of axiomatic theories within a single, fully interpreted type-theoretic framework and to investigate a number of meta-logical notions in it, such as those of model, consequence, consistency, completeness, and decidability. These attempts were largely unsuccessful, also in his own considered judgment. A detailed assessment of Carnap’s attempt shows, nevertheless, that his approach is much less confused and hopeless than it has often been made out to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37. Rumfitt on Truth-Grounds, Negation, and Vagueness.Richard Zach - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (8):2079-2089.
    In The Boundary Stones of Thought, Rumfitt defends classical logic against challenges from intuitionistic mathematics and vagueness, using a semantics of pre-topologies on possibilities, and a topological semantics on predicates, respectively. These semantics are suggestive but the characterizations of negation face difficulties that may undermine their usefulness in Rumfitt’s project.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  9
    Happy and Mad Families in L.Itay Neeman & Zach Norwood - 2018 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 83 (2):572-597.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  53
    Computation in Non-Classical Foundations?Toby Meadows & Zach Weber - 2016 - Philosophers' Imprint 16.
    The Church-Turing Thesis is widely regarded as true, because of evidence that there is only one genuine notion of computation. By contrast, there are nowadays many different formal logics, and different corresponding foundational frameworks. Which ones can deliver a theory of computability? This question sets up a difficult challenge: the meanings of basic mathematical terms are not stable across frameworks. While it is easy to compare what different frameworks say, it is not so easy to compare what they mean. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  22
    Pragmatism and Democratic Legitimacy: Beyond Minimalist Accounts of Deliberation.Zach Vanderveen - 2007 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (4):pp. 243-258.
  41. Non-Analytic Tableaux for Chellas's Conditional Logic CK and Lewis's Logic of Counterfactuals VC.Richard Zach - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Logic 15 (3):609-628.
    Priest has provided a simple tableau calculus for Chellas's conditional logic Ck. We provide rules which, when added to Priest's system, result in tableau calculi for Chellas's CK and Lewis's VC. Completeness of these tableaux, however, relies on the cut rule.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  50
    Atheism and Dialetheism; or, ‘Why I Am Not a (Paraconsistent) Christian’.Zach Weber - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):401-407.
    ABSTRACTIn ‘Theism and Dialetheism’, Cotnoir explores the idea that dialetheism can help with some puzzles about omnipotence in theology. In this note, I delineate another asp...
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  37
    Semantics and Proof Theory of the Epsilon Calculus.Richard Zach - 2017 - In Sujata Ghosh & Sanjiva Prasad (eds.), Logic and Its Applications. ICLA 2017. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer. pp. 27-47.
    The epsilon operator is a term-forming operator which replaces quantifiers in ordinary predicate logic. The application of this undervalued formalism has been hampered by the absence of well-behaved proof systems on the one hand, and accessible presentations of its theory on the other. One significant early result for the original axiomatic proof system for the epsilon-calculus is the first epsilon theorem, for which a proof is sketched. The system itself is discussed, also relative to possible semantic interpretations. The problems facing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Numbers and Functions in Hilbert's Finitism.Richard Zach - 1998 - Taiwanese Journal for History and Philosophy of Science 10:33-60.
    David Hilbert's finitistic standpoint is a conception of elementary number theory designed to answer the intuitionist doubts regarding the security and certainty of mathematics. Hilbert was unfortunately not exact in delineating what that viewpoint was, and Hilbert himself changed his usage of the term through the 1920s and 30s. The purpose of this paper is to outline what the main problems are in understanding Hilbert and Bernays on this issue, based on some publications by them which have so far received (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45.  1
    Reply to Zach Weber.Hartry Field - 2020 - Australasian Philosophical Review 4 (2):178-182.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  31
    Observations on the Trivial World.Zach Weber & Hitoshi Omori - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (5):975-994.
    A world is trivial if it makes every proposition true all at once. Such a world is impossible, an absurdity. Our world, we hope, is not an absurdity. It is important, nevertheless, for semantic and metaphysical theories that we be able to reason cogently about absurdities—if only to see that they are absurd. In this note we describe methods for ‘observing’ absurd objects like the trivial world without falling in to incoherence, using some basic techniques from modal logic. The goal (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  74
    Critical Study of Michael Potter’s Reason’s Nearest Kin. [REVIEW]Richard Zach - 2005 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 46 (4):503-513.
    Critical study of Michael Potter, Reason's Nearest Kin. Philosophies of Arithmetic from Kant to Carnap. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000. x + 305 pages.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  4
    Agent‐Based Modelling for SARS‐CoV ‐2 Epidemic Prediction and Intervention Assessment: A Methodological Appraisal.Mariusz Maziarz & Martin Zach - 2020 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 26 (5):1352-1360.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49.  57
    Intrinsic Value and the Last Last Man.Zach Weber - 2016 - Ratio 29 (4).
    Even if you were the last person on Earth, you should not cut down all the trees—or so goes the Last Man thought experiment, which has been taken to show that nature has intrinsic value. But ‘Last Man’ is caught on a dilemma. If Last Man is too far inside the anthropocentric circle, so to speak, his actions cannot be indicative of intrinsic value. If Last Man is cast too far outside the anthropocentric circle, though, then value terms lose their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  19
    Notes on Inconsistent Set Theory.Zach Weber - 2013 - In Francesco Berto, Edwin Mares, Koji Tanaka & Francesco Paoli (eds.), Paraconsistency: Logic and Applications. Springer. pp. 315--328.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 166