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  1. Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  2. Barbara Andrew (1994). The Psychology of Tyranny: Wollstonecraft and Woolf on the Gendered Dimension of War. Hypatia 9 (2):85 - 101.
    Mary Wollstonecraft and Virginia Woolf criticize the social construction of the soldier and argue that gender hierarchy relies on particular constructions of masculinity and femininity. Both contend that private tyrannies lead to public ones, and that men's domination in families provides a model for public domination. This reveals the social and psychological conditions which replicate domination, violence, and war. I examine how gender constructs promote and participate in the psychological conditions necessary for war.
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  3. G. J. Barker-Benfield (forthcoming). Mary Wollstonecraft: Eighteenth-Century Commonwealthwoman. Journal of the History of Ideas.
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  4. Sandrine Berges (2013). Mothers and Independent Citizens: Making Sense of Wollstonecraft's Supposed Essentialism. Philosophical Papers 42 (3):259 - 284.
    Mary Wollstonecraft argues that women must be independent citizens, but that they cannot be that unless they fulfill certain duties as mothers. This is problematic in a number of ways, as argued by Laura Brace in a 2000 article. However, I argue that if we understand Wollstonecraft's concept of independence in a republican, rather than a liberal context, and at the same time pay close attention to her discussion of motherhood, a feminist reading of Wollstonecraft is not only possible but (...)
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  5. Sandrine Berges (2013). Routledge Guidebook to Wollstonecraft's A Vindiciation of the Rights of Woman. Routledge.
    Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the greatest philosophers and writers of the Eighteenth century. During her brief career, she wrote novels, treatises, a travel narrative, a history of the French Revolution, a conduct book, and a children's book. Her most celebrated and widely-read work is A Vindication of the Rights of Woman . This Guidebook introduces: Wollstonecraft’s life and the background to A Vindication of the Rights of Woman The ideas and text of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (...)
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  6. Sandrine Berges (2011). Why Women Hug Their Chains: Wollstonecraft and Adaptive Preferences. Utilitas (1):72-87.
    In a recent article, Amartya Sen writes that one important influence on his theory of adaptive preferences is Wollstonecraft's account of how some women, though clearly oppressed, are apparently satisfied with their lot. Wollstonecraft's arguments have received little attention so far from contemporary political philosophers, and one might be tempted to dismiss Sen's acknowledgment as a form of gallantry. That would be wrong. Wollstonecraft does have a lot of interest to say on the topic of why her contemporaries appeared to (...)
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  7. Eileen Botting (2013). Making an American Feminist Icon: Mary Wollstonecraft's Reception in Us Newspapers, 1800-1869. History of Political Thought 34 (2):273-295.
    This article examines Mary Wollstonecraft's public reception in American newspapers from 1800 to 1869. Wollstonecraft was portrayed to the American public as a philosopher of women's rights, a new model of femininity, and a pioneer of women's political activism. Although these iconic uses of Wollstonecraft were regularly negative, they grew more positive as the women's rights movement gained steam alongside the abolition movement.
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  8. Eileen Hunt Botting (2012). Wollstonecraft in Europe, 1792–1904: A Revisionist Reception History. History of European Ideas 39 (4):503-527.
    Summary It has often been repeated that Wollstonecraft was not read for a century after her death in 1797 due to the negative impact of her husband William Godwin's Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798) on her posthumous reputation. By providing the first full-scale reception history of Wollstonecraft in continental Europe in the long nineteenth century?drawing on rare book research, translations of understudied primary sources, and Wollstonecraft scholarship from the nineteenth century to the (...)
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  9. Laura Brace (2000). 'Not Empire, but Equality': Mary Wollstonecraft, the Marriage State and the Sexual Contract. Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (4):433–455.
  10. David Bromwich (1995). Wollstonecraft as a Critic of Burke. Political Theory 23 (4):617-634.
  11. Carolyn Burdett (2009). The Burke–Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy. Intellectual History Review 19 (1):153-154.
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  12. Pamela Clemit (ed.) (2011). The Letters of William Godwin: Volume 1: 1778-1797. OUP Oxford.
    William Godwin became a leading public intellectual during the crisis in British politics which followed the French Revolution. The impact of his social theories was acknowledged by almost every significant literary figure in Britain for the next quarter-century, and his influence endured much longer in Europe. He married Mary Wollstonecraft, the early advocate of women's rights, and was the father of Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein. All of his letters are published for the first time in this edition. The first (...)
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  13. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2013). Freedom as Independence: Mary Wollstonecraft and the Grand Blessing of Life. Hypatia (1).
    Independence is a central and recurring theme in Wollstonecraft’s work. Independence should not be understood as an individualistic ideal that is in tension with the value of community but as an essential ingredient in successful and flourishing social relationships. I examine three aspects of this rich and complex concept that Wollstonecraft draws on as she develops her own notion of independence as a powerful feminist tool. First, independence is an egalitarian ideal that requires that all individuals, regardless of sex, are (...)
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  14. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2012). Mary Wollstonecraft, Freedom and the Enduring Power of Social Domination. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (2):116-135.
    Even long after their formal exclusion has come to an end, members of previously oppressed social groups often continue to face disproportionate restrictions on their freedom, as the experience of many women over the last century has shown. Working within in a framework in which freedom is understood as independence from arbitrary power, Mary Wollstonecraft provides an explanation of why such domination may persist and offers a model through which it can be addressed. Republicans rely on processes of rational public (...)
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  15. Jane Duran (2006). Eight Women Philosophers: Theory, Politics, and Feminism. University of Illinois Press.
    Overviews -- Hildegard of Bingen -- Anne Conway -- Mary Astell -- Mary Wollstonecraft -- Harriet Taylor Mill -- Edith Stein -- Simone Weil -- Simone de Beauvoir -- Conclusions.
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  16. Maria J. Falco (ed.) (1995). Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft. Penn State University Press.
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  17. Francisco Fuster García (2007). Dos propuestas de la Ilustración para la educación de la mujer: Rousseau versus Mary Wollstonecraft. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 50:8.
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  18. Catherine Gardner (1998). Catharine Macaulay's "Letters on Education": Odd but Equal. Hypatia 13 (1):118 - 137.
    Commentators on the work of Catharine Macaulay acknowledge her influence on the pioneering feminist writing of Mary Wollstonecraft. Yet despite Macaulay's interest in equal education for women, these commentators have not considered that Macaulay offered a self-contained, sustained argument for the equality of women. This paper endeavors to show that Macaulay did produce such an argument, and that she holds a place in the development of early feminism independent of her connections with Wollstonecraft.
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  19. Catherine Villanueva Gardner (2000). Rediscovering Women Philosophers: Philosophical Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy. Westview.
    This book examines the philosophical foremothers of women’s philosophy and explores what their work may have to offer modern theorizing in feminist ethics. Through such writers as Catharine Macaulay, Mary Wollstonecraft, and George Eliot, Gardner interprets a varied selection of moral philosophers in an attempt both to contribute to our understanding of their work, and perhaps even to encourage other philosophers to interpretive work of their own. She also looks into the reasons such forms as novels, letters, and poetry have (...)
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  20. Moira Gatens (1991). 'The Oppressed State of My Sex': Wollstonecraft on Reason, Feeling and Equality. In Carole Pateman & Mary Lyndon Shanley (eds.), Feminist Interpretations and Political Theory. Polity Press in Association with Basil Blackwell, Oxford, Uk. 112--28.
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  21. Moira Gatens (1986). Rousseau and Wollstonecraft: Nature Vs. Reason. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (sup1):1-15.
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  22. Sam George (2005). The Cultivation of the Female Mind: Enlightened Growth, Luxuriant Decay and Botanical Analogy in Eighteenth-Century Texts. History of European Ideas 31 (2):209-223.
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  23. Eric B. Gorham (1993). A Vindication of Political Virtue: The Political Theory of Mary Wollstonecraft (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (4):641-643.
  24. Karen Green (1997). For Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 12 (4).
  25. Karen Green (1997). The Passions and the Imagination in Wollstonecraft's Theory of Moral Judgement. Utilitas 9 (03):271-.
    According to Wollstonecraft . This suggests that for her ethical judgement is based on reason, and so she is an ethical cognitivist. This impression is upheld by the fact that she clearly believes in the existence of ethical truth and has little sympathy with subjectivism. At the same time, she places a great deal of importance on the role of the emotions in ethical judgement. This raises the question how the emotions can be relevant if ethics consists in a realm (...)
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  26. Karen Green (1994). Freud, Wollstonecraft, and Ecofeminism. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):117-134.
    I examine recent arguments to the effect that there are significant logical, conceptual, historical, or psychosexual connections between the subordination of women and the subordination of nature and argue that they are all problematic. Although there are important connections between women’s emancipation and the achievement of important environmental goals, they are practical connections rather than conceptual ones.
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  27. Morwenna Griffiths (2014). Educational Relationships: Rousseau, Wollstonecraft and Social Justice. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):339-354.
    I consider educational relationships as found in Rousseau's Émile (and elsewhere in his writing) and the critique of his views in Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Women. Wollstonecraft's critique is a significant one, precisely because of her partial agreement with Rousseau. Like Rousseau, her concern is less to do with particular pedagogical techniques or even approaches, more to do with the full complexity of educational relationships. The educational relationships they consider include those between human beings now and in (...)
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  28. Jean Grimshaw (1984). Mary Wollstonecraft and the Tensions in Feminist Philosophy. In Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.), Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge. 9--26.
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  29. Claire Grogan (1994). Mary Wollstonecraft and Hannah More: Politics, Feminism and Modern Critics. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 13:99.
  30. Susan Gubar (forthcoming). Feminist Misogyny: Mary Wollstonecraft and the Paradox of" It Takes One to Know One&Quot;. Feminist Studies.
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  31. Lena Halldenius (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft's Feminist Critique of Property: On Becoming a Thief From Principle. Hypatia 29 (3).
    The scholarship on Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797) is divided concerning her views on women's role in public life, property rights, and distribution of wealth. Her critique of inequality of wealth is undisputed, but is it a complaint only of inequality or does it strike more forcefully at the institution of property? The argument in this article is that Wollstonecraft's feminism is partly defined by a radical critique of property, intertwined with her conception of rights. Dissociating herself from the conceptualization of rights (...)
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  32. Lena Halldenius (2007). The Primacy of Right. On the Triad of Liberty, Equality and Virtue in Wollstonecraft's Political Thought. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):75 – 99.
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  33. Cressida Heyes (2000). Teaching Wollstonecraft's Maria, Or the Wrongs of Woman. Teaching Philosophy 23 (2):111-125.
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  34. S. Hutton (1999). Mary Astell: Political Writings; Mary Wollstonecraft: A Vindication of the Rights of Men, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7:176-177.
  35. Catriona MacKenzie (1993). Reason and Sensibility: The Ideal of Women's Self-Governance in the Writings of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 8 (4):35 - 55.
    It is standard in feminist commentaries to argue that Wollstonecraft's feminism is vitiated by her commitment to a liberal philosophical framework, relying on a valuation of reason over passion and on the notion of a sex-neutral self. I challenge this interpretation of Wollstonecraft's feminism and argue that her attempt to articulate an ideal of self-governance for women was an attempt to diagnose and resolve some of the tensions and inadequacies within traditional liberal thought.
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  36. John McCrystal (1993). Revolting Women the Use of Revolutionary Discourse in Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft Compared. History of Political Thought 14 (2):189-203.
  37. D. O'Neill (2002). Shifting the Scottish Paradigm: The Discourse of Morals and Manners in Mary Wollstonecraft's French Revolution. History of Political Thought 23 (1):90-116.
  38. Daniel I. O'Neill (2012). The Burke-Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy. Penn State University Press.
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  39. Daniel I. O'Neill (2007). John Adams Versus Mary Wollstonecraft on the French Revolution and Democracy. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (3):451-476.
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  40. Paola Partenza (2012). Mary Wollstonecraft. Cultura 9 (1):85-100.
    The concept of truth is one of the pivotal elements in Mary Wollstonecraft’s works. In line with her philosophical treatise, Maria: or the Wrongs of Woman(published posthumously in 1798) it becomes a paradigmatic expression of her thought. The author textualizes the obfuscation of the truth and the repression ofthe heorine’s self because of her unconventional conduct not judged in consonance with the social rules that govern patriarchal institutions. The novel might be read as a profound reflection on any form of (...)
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  41. Carole Pateman (2009). Wollstonecraft. In David Boucher & Paul Kelly (eds.), Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oup Oxford.
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  42. Eleanor Rathbone (1899). Book Review:A Study of Mary Wollstonecraft and the Rights of Woman. Emma Rauscherbusch Clough. [REVIEW] Ethics 9 (3):407-.
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  43. Martina Reuter (2014). “Like a Fanciful Kind of Half Being”: Mary Wollstonecraft's Criticism of Jean‐Jacques Rousseau. Hypatia 29 (3).
    The article investigates the philosophical foundations and details of Mary Wollstonecraft's criticism of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the education and nature of women. I argue that Wollstonecraft's criticism must not be understood as a constructionist critique of biological reductionism. The first section analyzes the differences between Wollstonecraft's and Rousseau's views on the possibility of a true civilization and shows how these differences connect to their respective conceptions of moral psychology. The section shows that Wollstonecraft's disagreement with Rousseau's views on women (...)
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  44. Martina Reuter, Lena Halldenius & Alan Coffee (2014). Mary Wollstonecraft: Philosophy and Enlightenment. Hypatia 29 (3).
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  45. Virginia Sapiro (1992). A Vindication of Political Virtue: The Political Theory of Mary Wollstonecraft. University of Chicago Press.
    Nearly two hundred years ago, Mary Wollstonecraft wrote what is considered to be the first major work of feminist political theory: A Vindication of the Rights of Women . Much has been written about this work, and about Wollstonecraft as the intellectual pioneer of feminism, but the actual substance and coherence of her political thought have been virtually ignored. Virginia Sapiro here provides the first full-length treatment of Wollstonecraft's political theory. Drawing on all of Wollstonecraft's works and treating them thematically (...)
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  46. Nancy A. Stanlick (1997). Book Review: Maria J. Falco. Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft. University Park, Pa: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996. [REVIEW] Hypatia 12 (1):179-182.
  47. Nancy A. Stanlick (1997). Feminist Interpretations of Mary Wollstonecraft. By MARIA J. FALCO. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996. [REVIEW] Hypatia 12 (1):179-182.
  48. Barbara Taylor (1999). Mysogyny and Feminism: The Case of Mary Wollstonecraft. Constellations 6 (4):499-512.
  49. Natalie Fuehrer Taylor (2006). The Rights of Woman as Chimera: The Political Philosophy of Mary Wollstonecraft. Routledge.
    The land of chimeras -- Rousseau's half-being -- Navigating the land of chimeras with our only star & compass -- John Locke's other half being -- Nature does nothing in vain -- The foundation of almost every social virtue -- In a word, a better citizen.
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  50. S. Tomaselli (2005). Saba Bahar: Mary Wollstonecraft's Social and Aesthetic Philosophy:An Eve to Please Me'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3).
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