About this topic
Summary Plato's cosmology can be found mostly in the Timaeus, although also in some other dialogues, such as the Laws. Scholars interested in his cosmology have tended to focus on the creation of the world and the ethical dimensions of Plato's cosmology, but there are countless interesting sites of scholarly research.
Key works For a discussion of Plato on astronomy, see Gregory 1996. For a discussion of Plato on the creation of the world, see Johansen 2014. For discussions of cosmology and ethics, see Betegh 2003 and Carone 2005.
Introductions Carone 2005 is a great study of the ethics of Plato's cosmology and surveys multiple dialogues. Cornford 1935 is a crucial commentary on Plato's Timaeus, and Cornford's title for the commentary, Plato's Cosmology, reflects its value to those interested in learning about Plato's cosmological views.
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  1. Plato on Education - The Philosopher King.Sfetcu Nicolae -
    Plato's educational model (paidèia) differentiates the level of education according to the students' skills. Thus, a basic education includes, in addition to gymnastics and fighting (the exercise of the body), music (the exercise of the spirit), without being imposed by force because a free man must be free in the conquest of knowledge. If the student has skills, he is educated in mathematics to become a strategist, and in astronomy to raise the soul. From these, the best are selected to (...)
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  2. Irrigating Blood: Plato on the Circulatory System, the Cosmos, and Elemental Motion.Douglas Campbell - forthcoming - Journal of the History of Philosophy.
    This article concerns the so-called irrigation system in the Timaeus’ biology (77a-81e), which replenishes our body’s tissues with resources from food delivered as blood. I argue that this system functions mainly by the natural like-to-like motion of the elements and that the circulation of blood is an important case study of Plato’s physics. We are forced to revise the view that the elements attract their like. Instead, similar elements merely tend to coalesce with each other in virtue of their tactile (...)
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  3. Biology in the Timaeus’ Account of Nous and Cognitive Life.Douglas R. Campbell - forthcoming - In Melina G. Mouzala (ed.), Cognition in Ancient Greek Philosophy and its Reception: Intedisciplinary Approaches. Academia Verlag/Nomos. pp. 145-172.
    I develop an account of the role that biology plays in the Timaeus’ view of nous and other aspects of cognitive life. I begin by outlining the biology of human cognition. I then argue that these biological views shine an important light on different aspects of the soul. I then argue that the human body is particularly friendly to nous, paying special attention to the heart and the liver. I next consider the ways that the body fails to protect our (...)
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  4. What Time is Not: εἰκών and ἀριθμός in Plato’s Account of Time in the Timaeus (37d5-7) and the Platonic Tradition.Thomas Seissl - forthcoming - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition:1-28.
    In one of the most famous but equally obscure passages in the Timaeus, Plato describes the generation of time and the heavens. The “moving image of eternity” (37d5) is commonly read as Plato’s most general characterisation of time. Rémi Brague famously challenged the traditional interpretation on linguistic grounds by claiming that Plato actually did not conceive of time as an image (εἰκών) but rather as a number (ἀριθμός). In this paper, I shall claim that this controversy is by no means (...)
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  5. The Suspicious Substrate: Calcidius on Grasping Matter.Nena Bobovnik - 2024 - Apeiron 57 (1):1-24.
    In the Timaeus, Plato famously acknowledges the receptacle as extremely difficult to comprehend. It is neither intelligible (which is reserved exclusively for the Forms) nor sense-perceptible (as it is a principle far too basic). Instead, as Plato proposes, the receptacle can only be apprehended through a “bastard” sort of “reasoning” (νόθος λογισμός, Tim. 52b1-2.). This paper explores an exegesis of Plato’s claim as offered by Calcidius, the 4th century translator of and commentator on the Timaeus. I identify two distinctive methods (...)
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  6. Cosmos and Perception in Plato’s Timaeus: In the Eye of the Cognitive Storm. By Mark Eli Kalderon. [REVIEW]Douglas R. Campbell - 2024 - Ancient Philosophy 44 (1):255-258.
    This is an impressive and important book about perception in Plato’s Timaeus, but most of its readers will probably be researchers who are interested in much broader questions about the dialogue. There is nothing deficient or lacking about this treatment of perception, but this book should be put alongside Thomas Johansen’s Plato’s Natural Philosophy and Sarah Broadie’s Nature and Divinity in the sense that this is, for all intents and purposes, a monograph about the whole Timaeus, even though it is (...)
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  7. Does the Universe Perceive? On Cosmic Perception in the Timaeus.Preite Alesia - 2023 - Méthexis 35 (1):108–133.
    In the present paper, I argue that in order to be in a position to understand what the World Soul thinks about, we need first to answer the question of whether the universe perceives and if so, of what it perceives. I shall first (section ) lay out the main reasons for suspecting that the universe has perception and some possible objections against this view. I will then (section ) make a case for my claim that the universe has perception (...)
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  8. Traditional and Cosmic Gods in Later Plato and the Early Academy.Vilius Bartninkas - 2023 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This book sheds new light on Plato's cosmology in relation to Greek religion by examining the contested distinction between the traditional and cosmic gods. A close reading of the later dialogues shows that the two families of gods are routinely deployed to organise and structure Plato's accounts of the origins of the universe and of humanity and its social institutions, and to illuminate the moral and political ideals of philosophical utopias. Vilius Bartninkas argues that the presence of the two kinds (...)
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  9. Plato on Sunaitia.Douglas R. Campbell - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (4):739-768.
    I argue that Plato thinks that a sunaition is a mere tool used by a soul (or by the cosmic nous) to promote an intended outcome. In the first section, I develop the connection between sunaitia and Plato’s teleology. In the second section, I argue that sunaitia belong to Plato’s theory of the soul as a self-mover: specifically, they are those things that are set in motion by the soul in the service of some goal. I also argue against several (...)
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  10. Vera Calchi: The Theology of the Epinomis. [REVIEW]Federico Casella - 2023 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 44 (1):191-195.
  11. Cosmos and Perception in Plato's Timaeus.Mark Eli Kalderon - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    This is an essay on perception and its objects in the Timaeus. Two features of this work are noteworthy. First, the emphasis throughout is on Timaeus' views and not Plato's. Second, I show how broader aspects of Timaeus' cosmology are directly relevant to his philosophy of perception.
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  12. Plato’s Timaeus and the Limits of Natural Science.Ian MacFarlane - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (3):495-517.
    The relationship between mind and necessity is one of the major points of difficulty for the interpretation of Plato’s Timaeus. At times Timaeus seems to say the demiurge is omnipotent in his creation, and at other times seems to say he is limited by pre-existing matter. Most interpretations take one of the two sides, but this paper proposes a novel approach to interpreting this issue which resolves the difficulty. This paper suggests that in his speech Timaeus presents two hypothetical models (...)
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  13. On Plato’s Precosmos ( Ti. 52d2–53c3).Federico M. Petrucci - 2023 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 44 (1):45-64.
    The aim of this paper is to provide a new reading of Plato’s precosmos (Ti. 52d2–53c3). More specifically, I shall argue that the precosmos is populated by bodies deriving from random complexes of properties, and that this is the effect of the Receptacle’s full precosmic participation in the Paradigm. This will turn out to be consistent with a robust notion of ‘precosmic generation’ and will reveal why Plato may have sought to refer to this otherwise puzzling scenario: representing the precosmos (...)
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  14. Proportionate Atomism: Solving the Problem of Isomorphic Variants in Plato’s Timaeus.Lea Aurelia Schroeder - 2023 - Phronesis 68 (1):31-61.
    The principles governing elemental composition, variation, and change in Plato’s Timaeus appear to be incompatible, which has led commentators to prioritize some of the principles to the exclusion of others. Call this seeming incompatibility the problem of isomorphic variants. In this paper, I develop the theory of proportionate atomism as a solution to this problem. Proportionate atomism retains the advantages of rival interpretations but allows the principles of material composition, variation, and change to combine into an internally coherent and explanatorily (...)
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  15. Anthropomorphic Motifs in Ancient Greek Ideas on the Origin of the Cosmos.Zuzana Zelinová & František Škvrnda - 2023 - Human Affairs 33 (2):172-183.
    In our article, we will focus on an analysis of the relationship between man and the cosmos, set against the backdrop of ancient Greek ideas about the origin of the world. On the one hand, we will deal with the images of the creation of the world provided in Greek mythology and the religious tradition associated with it (in particular Hesiod); on the other hand, we will approach the anthropomorphic elements within the framework of philosophical cosmogonies (Plato’s dialogue, the Timaeus). (...)
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  16. Chaos, cosmos and creation in early Greek theogonies: an ontological exploration.Olaf Almqvist - 2022 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Cosmological narratives like the creation story in the book of Genesis or the modern Big Bang are popularly understood to be descriptions of how the universe was created. However, cosmologies also say a great deal more. Indeed, the majority of cosmologies, ancient and modern, explore not simply how the world was made but how humans relate to their surrounding environment and the often thin line which separates humans from gods and animals. Combining approaches from classical studies, anthropology, and philosophy, this (...)
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  17. Giovanni Pico della Mirandola.Francisco Bastitta Harriet - 2022 - In Natalia Jacubecki, María Cecilia Rusconi & Natalia Strok (eds.), Platón cosmólogo. Recepción del Timeo entre la Edad Media y la temprana Modernidad. Winograd. pp. 483-529.
    As in the case of other humanists and philosophers of the period, an important aspect of Pico della Mirandola's interpretation of the Platonic Timaeus consists of direct access to the dialogue in its original Greek, which the young man possessed in his personal library. This does not mean that Pico does not also take an interest in the ancient Latin translations of Cicero and Calcidius, both personally and in Ficino's circle. But these are read with the critical distance and the (...)
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  18. La recepción del Timeo en la Antigüedad griega.Francisco Bastitta Harriet - 2022 - In Natalia Jacubecki, María Cecilia Rusconi & Natalia Strok (eds.), Platón cosmólogo. Recepción del Timeo entre la Edad Media y la temprana Modernidad. Winograd. pp. 19-28.
    General introduction to early Greek philosophical exegeses of Plato's Timaeus, from the early Academy to the beginning of the Roman Empire in pagan, Jewish and Christian circles. -/- Introducción general a las primeras exégesis filosóficas del Timeo de Platón, desde la temprana Academia hasta los inicios del Imperio romano en ámbitos paganos, judíos y cristianos de habla griega.
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  19. Located in Space: Plato’s Theory of Psychic Motion.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy 42 (2):419-442.
    I argue that Plato thinks that the soul has location, surface, depth, and extension, and that the Timaeus’ composition of the soul out of eight circles is intended literally. A novel contribution is the development of an account of corporeality that denies the entailment that the soul is corporeal. I conclude by examining Aristotle’s objection to the Timaeus’ psychology and then the intellectual history of this reading of Plato.
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  20. Plato's Theory of Reincarnation: Eschatology and Natural Philosophy.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Review of Metaphysics 75 (4):643-665.
    This article concerns the place of Plato’s eschatology in his philosophy. I argue that the theory of reincarnation appeals to Plato due to its power to explain how non-human animals came to be. Further, the outlines of this theory are entailed by other commitments, such as that embodiment disrupts psychic functioning, that virtue is always rewarded and vice punished, and that the soul is immortal. I conclude by arguing that Plato develops a view of reincarnation as the chief tool that (...)
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  21. The Soul’s Tomb: Plato on the Body as the Cause of Psychic Disorders.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):119-139.
    I argue that, according to Plato, the body is the sole cause of psychic disorders. This view is expressed at Timaeus 86b in an ambiguous sentence that has been widely misunderstood by translators and commentators. The goal of this article is to offer a new understanding of Plato’s text and view. In the first section, I argue that although the body is the result of the gods’ best efforts, their sub-optimal materials meant that the soul is constantly vulnerable to the (...)
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  22. The World Soul and the Emergence of Human Life.Anna Corrias - 2022 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 17 (1):61-82.
    Marsilio Ficino’s view on ensoulment, which can be extrapolated from his critique of natal astrology, relies on the relations of metaphysical proportion between the different levels of life and being which are central to Platonic philosophy. Drawing primarily on Plotinus, Ficino describes the emergence of life in the embryo as a process in which the World Soul is the true agent. For him, the ‘human nature’ that is present in the developing embryo attracts into the mother’s womb the seed of (...)
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  23. Mind and Necessity in Timaeus’ Hepatology.Evan Coulter - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy 42 (1):105-119.
    Analogies between the human and the cosmos run throughout Plato’s Timaeus. Timaeus claims that the cosmos came to be as mind’s “persuasion of necessity.” This paper argues that an anthropological equivalent to this “persuasion” can be found in Timaeus’ suggestive account of the human liver. Mediating between intellect and desire, the organ shows the problem of mind and necessity reflected in the human soul.
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  24. Mathematics and Cosmology in Plato’s Timaeus.Andrew Gregory - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (3):359-389.
    Plato used mathematics extensively in his account of the cosmos in the Timaeus, but as he did not use equations, but did use geometry, harmony and according to some, numerology, it has not been clear how or to what effect he used mathematics. This paper argues that the relationship between mathematics and cosmology is not atemporally evident and that Plato’s use of mathematics was an open and rational possibility in his context, though that sort of use of mathematics has subsequently (...)
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  25. Evil, Demiurgy, and the Taming of Necessity in Plato’s Timaeus.Elizabeth Jelinek & Casey Hall - 2022 - International Philosophical Quarterly 62 (1):5-21.
    Plato’s Timaeus reveals a cosmos governed by Necessity and Intellect; commentators have debated the relationship between them. Non-literalists hold that the demiurge, having carte blanche in taming Necessity, is omnipotent. But this omnipotence, alongside the attributes of benevolence and omniscience, creates problems when non-literalists address the problem of evil. We take the demiurge rather as limited by Necessity. This position is supported by episodes within the text, and by its larger consonance with Plato’s philosophy of evil and responsibility. By recognizing (...)
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  26. L’être et le temps dans le Parménide et dans le Timée de Platon.F. Karfík - 2022 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 16 (2):134-151.
    Two of Plato’s dialogues, the Parmenides and the Timaeus, deal explicitly with the relationship between being and time. The former builds on the assumption that whatever is must be temporal, while the latter makes being and time mutually exclusive. This paper begins by examining how the argument develops in the Parmenides, specifically in the corresponding sections 140e1-142a1 and 151e3-155e3 of the first and the second deductions of the dialectical exercise, as well as in the corollary to the second deduction at (...)
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  27. Plotin interprète de la chôra du Timée (Ennéades III, 6 [26], 13‑18).Filip Karfík - 2022 - Chôra 20:93-105.
    How does Plotinus interpret the chora in Plato’s Timaeus? For him, Timaeus 48e‑52d deals with matter (hyle). The identification of chora with hyle goes back to Aristotle’s Physics IV.2. Aristotle’s interpretation of Plato’s chora as matter was echoed by Theophrastus and the Stoics and prevailed in Middle‑Platonist, neo‑Pythagorean and early Christian authors. In addition to the identification of chora with hyle, the ancient interpreters of the Timaeus conflated hyle with Plato’s ananke (Tim. 47e‑48a). Plato himself distinguishes between chora and ananke. (...)
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  28. Plato’s Timaeus and the limits of natural science.Ian J. MacFarlane - 2022 - Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin
    The Timaeus is perhaps the most unusual of Plato’s dialogues. In this paper, I attempt to interpret Timaeus’s strange speech, which makes up most of the dialogue. I argue that Timaeus has grasped the grave challenge posed to philosophic reason by men like Hesiod who claim that mysterious gods are the first causes of the world, and therefore one cannot say that there are any true necessities governing this world. If this is true, then philosophy, as the study of nature, (...)
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  29. The Ontology of Images in Plato’s Timaeus.Samuel Meister - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (6):909-30.
    In the Timaeus, Plato’s Timaeus offers an account of the sensible world in terms of “images” of forms. Often, images are taken to be particulars: either objects or particular property instances (tropes). Contrary to this trend, I argue that images are general characteristics which are immanent in the receptacle, or bundles of such characteristics. Thus, the entire sensible world can be analysed in terms of immanent general characteristics, the receptacle, and forms. Hence, for Timaeus, fundamentally, there are no sensible particulars. (...)
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  30. Pardon the Interruption.Paul Allen Miller - 2022 - Classical Antiquity 41 (1):51-66.
    The Timaeus is a muthos that attempts to imagine a logos of the cosmos. Like the demiurge, readers are to be mimetic artists, poets, who move constantly between the intelligible essences and their likenesses in the world of appearance, experience, and becoming, occupying a third register that is neither and both. The cosmology of the Timaeus is both a likely story and an allegory of its own failure. It takes place within the nonspace of the khōra, a realm accessible only (...)
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  31. “This” and “Such” in the Receptacle Passage of Plato’s Timaeus.Takeshi Nakamura - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (2):239-265.
    One short passage on what is called the Receptacle in Plato’s Timaeus has been the subject of much controversy since Cherniss presented an alternative reading of it in 1954. In this paper, I criticize an influential argument presented by Zeyl for a traditional reading, and propose a new interpretation which adopts the alternative reading on important sentences of the passage, but is not accompanied by the defects of Cherniss’ interpretation.
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  32. Two Theories of Change in Plato’s Timaeus.Takeshi Nakamura - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy Today 4 (1):4-29.
    In Plato’s Timaeus, two different theories – the Receptacle theory and the geometrical particle theory – are presented to explain change in the natural world. In this paper, I argue that there is tension between the two theories. After examining several possible solutions for this tension, I conclude that Plato does not present it as something ready to be solved within the dialogue but, rather, as something to be understood in a way that maintains both theories. Finally, I also argue (...)
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  33. El Timeo de Platón en el Renacimiento y en la Temprana Modernidad.Andrea Noel Paul & Francisco Bastitta Harriet - 2022 - In Natalia Jacubecki, María Cecilia Rusconi & Natalia Strok (eds.), Platón cosmólogo. Recepción del Timeo entre la Edad Media y la temprana Modernidad. Winograd. pp. 93-107.
    This chapter provides a general introduction to the Italian Renaissance and its reception of Plato's cosmology, with special emphasis on the manuscript tradition, the new translations and commentaries on the Timaeus and their impact on philosophical and scientific discussions. -/- En el presente capítulo se ofrece una introducción general el período del Renacimiento italiano y a su recepción de la cosmología de Platón, con especial énfasis en la tradición manuscrita, las nuevas traducciones y comentarios al Timeo y sus repercusiones en (...)
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  34. Cosmology and Anankê in the Timaeus and Our Knowledge of the Forms.Naomi Reshotko - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (4):509-535.
    At Tm. 47e, Timaeus steps back from his discussion of what came about through noûs and turns toward an account of what came about through anankê. Broadie, 2012, Nature and Divinity in Plato’s Timaeus, sketches out two routes for the interpretation of this ‘new beginning.’ The ‘metaphysical’ approach uses perceptibles qua imitations of intelligibles in order to glimpse the intelligibles (just as we look at our reflection in a mirror in order to view ourselves). The ‘cosmological’ reading assumes we use (...)
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  35. Wandering motion in Plato’s Timaeus.Eric Sanday - 2022 - Chôra 20:33-53.
    Au moment de décrire la fonction des yeux humains, qui sont donnés par les dieux afin que l’on puisse déduire la philosophie et le nombre à partir de la rotation du firmament, Timée interrompt son récit pour développer son explication des mécanismes physiques sous‑jacents à la fois à la vision et à tout type de mouvement et de changement. Il est intéressant de noter que, dans le contexte du Timée dans son ensemble, la chôra ne semble pas indispensable. Par exemple, (...)
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  36. Before the Creation of Time in Plato’s Timaeus.Daniel Vázquez - 2022 - In Daniel Vázquez & Alberto Ross (eds.), Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition. pp. 111–133.
    I defend, against its more recent critics, a literal, factual, and consistent interpretation of Timaeus’ creation of the cosmos and time. My main purpose is to clarify the assumptions under which a literal interpretation of Timaeus’ cosmology becomes philosophically attractive. I propose five exegetical principles that guide my interpretation. Unlike previous literalists, I argue that assuming a “pre-cosmic time” is a mistake. Instead, I challenge the exegetical assumptions scholars impose on the text and argue that for Timaeus, a mere succession (...)
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  37. Self‐Motion and Cognition: Plato's Theory of the Soul.Douglas R. Campbell - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):523-544.
    I argue that Plato believes that the soul must be both the principle of motion and the subject of cognition because it moves things specifically by means of its thoughts. I begin by arguing that the soul moves things by means of such acts as examination and deliberation, and that this view is developed in response to Anaxagoras. I then argue that every kind of soul enjoys a kind of cognition, with even plant souls having a form of Aristotelian discrimination (...)
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  38. La question cosmologique: Platon, Lemaître et l'origine de l'Univers.Lendja Ngnemzué & Ange Bergson - 2021 - Paris: L'Harmattan.
    Le démiurge de Platon et l'atome primitif de Lemaître sont deux intuitions inédites, artifices théoriques d'astronomie anti-observationnelle. La genèse de ces artifices remonte à la thématisation présocratique de l'unité cosmique. Platon institutionnalise les Formes intelligibles et platonise les présocratiques. Lemaître, contemporain d'Einstein, est tributaire d'une unité cosmique marquée par la gravitation relativiste, qui disqualifie le système classique ayant, en son temps, déclassé les substances et le mouvement aristotéliciens. La théorisation montre comment Platon fait du démiurge le concept axial de son (...)
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  39. The Two-Triangle Universe of Plato’s Timaeus and the In(de)finite Diversity of the Universe.Salomon Ofman & Luc Brisson - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):493-518.
    In the present article, we consider the question of the primary elements in Plato’s Timaeus, the components of the whole universe reduced, by an extraordinarily elegant construction, to two right triangles. But how does he reconcile such a model with the infinite diversity of the universe? A large part of this study is devoted to Cornford’s explanation in his commentary of the Timaeus and its shortcomings, in order to finally propose a revised one, which we think to be entirely consistent (...)
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  40. Polis and Cosmos in Plato’s Laws.Ryan Balot - 2020 - Polis 37 (3):516-533.
    Recent scholarship has followed Glenn Morrow in seeking to understand Plato’s politics in light of his cosmology. This essay takes a different tack and interprets the theology and cosmology of the Laws as an outgrowth of the Athenian Stranger’s conversation with Kleinias, which focuses on politics and warfare. In that sense the arguments of Book 10 are closely tied to the context of the dialogue. The Athenian Stranger’s religious ideology is not designed to be permanent or universally applicable. Rather, it (...)
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  41. Returning to the Heavens: Plato’s Socrates on Anaxagoras and Natural Philosophy.Samuel Ortencio Flores - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (2):123-146.
    Readers of Plato since antiquity have generally taken Socrates’ intellectual autobiography in the Phaedo as a signal of his turn away from the study of natural philosophy. They have turned instead to characters such as Timaeus for evidence of Plato’s pursuit of physics. This article argues that Plato’s Socrates himself developed a philosophy of nature in his criticism of Anaxagoras and his subsequent philosophic pursuits. Socrates’ autobiography places the study of nature in a foundational position within the development of his (...)
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  42. Hippocrates at phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
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  43. Human Nature in Plato's Philosophy.Fatih Özkan - 2020 - Entelekya Logico-Metaphysical Review 4 (2):155-172.
    Plato argued that knowledge of human nature can be reached through dialogue and dialectical method in accordance with the Socratic heritage. In his philosophy, man can be defined as being capable of rationally answering a rational question. By giving rational answers to himself and others, human also becomes a moral subject. In Plato's philosophy, we see a clear program based on human nature. Issues related to human nature are discussed in the process of applying Plato's theory of ideas to the (...)
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  44. Narrative Order and the Cosmo-Political Representations of the Characters in the Timaeus.Daniel Alejandro Restrepo - 2020 - Méthexis 1 (32):86-109.
    In this essay, I argue that the ordering of the speeches in Plato’s Timaeus indicates two things. First, each speech represents one of the three genera or principles Timaeus discusses. Socrates’ summary represents the forms, Critias’ Atlantis story embodies Becoming, and Timaeus’ cosmology serves as χώρα. Second, Timaeus responds to the other speakers in the order in which they were presented before beginning again with χώρα. Once Timaeus introduces χώρα, one of his tasks is laying the groundwork for Critias’ war (...)
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  45. Theokritos Kouremenos. Plato’s Forms, Mathematics, and Astronomy. (Trends in Classics—Supplementary Volumes, 67.) vi + 152 pp., bibl., index. Berlin: De Gruyter, 2018. €99.95 (cloth); ISBN 9783110601435. Paper and e-book available. [REVIEW]Luca Simeoni - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):864-866.
  46. Can One Speak of Teleology in Plato?Luc Brisson - 2019 - Les Cahiers Philosophiques de Strasbourg 45:117-138.
    Chez les interprètes récents du Timée de Platon, le terme « téléologie », inventé au xviiie siècle, a pris une place déterminante. Mais l’usage de ce terme trahit une interprétation aristotélicienne de la figure du démiurge qu’il s’agit d’assimiler au premier moteur, dans le contexte de la cause finale. On s’interrogera ici sur l’origine de ce terme, et sur la pertinence de son usage pour comprendre le rôle que joue le démiurge dans le Timée.
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  47. Plato’s Creative Imagination: (Re)Membering the Chora(l) Love that We Are.Cheryl Lynch-Lawler - 2019 - Feminist Theology 28 (1):104-123.
    The Platonic chora, as the third, intermediating term, has been left in a state of virtual dereliction in the West. Its ternary logic transmutes oppositional logics of binarity, including the oppositions of interior and exterior, psyche and cosmos, human and divine. In this article I analyse the mytho-philosophical trajectory of the chora from Plato’s Timaeus, and Diotimaic love found in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that both the disruptive force of Diotimaic love, and the subversive chora with its ‘bastard reasoning’1 are (...)
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  48. The Tomb of the Artisan God: On Plato's Timaeus.Serge Margel - 2019 - Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
    A far-reaching reinterpretation of Plato’s Timaeus and its engagement with time, eternity, body, and soul that in its original French edition profoundly influenced Derrida The Tomb of the Artisan God provides a radical rereading of Timaeus, Plato’s metaphysical text on time, eternity, and the relationship between soul and body. First published in French in 1995, the original edition of Serge Margel’s book included an extensive introductory essay by Jacques Derrida, who drew on Margel’s insights in developing his own concepts of (...)
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  49. Plato and Cosmology, Theology and Cognition.G. Betegh - 2018 - In John E. Sisko (ed.), Philosophy of mind in antiquity. New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  50. Cosmic and Human Cognition in the Timaeus.Gábor Betegh - 2018 - In John E. Sisko (ed.), Philosophy of mind in antiquity. New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group. pp. 120-140.
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