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1 — 50 / 169
  1. added 2019-03-22
    The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman. Moore - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300-322.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of example over their rhetorical appeal to the soul of the learner. Following a small but significant trend in recent rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigmata, following the discussion of example in (...)
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  2. added 2019-02-18
    Plato's Pharmacy.Jacques Derrida - 1981 - In Barbara Johnson (ed.), Dissemination. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. pp. 61-171.
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  3. added 2018-07-28
    Division as a Method in Plato.Hallvard Fossheim - 2012 - In Jakob Fink (ed.), The Development of Dialectic from Plato to Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
  4. added 2018-07-28
    On Plato's Use of Socrates as a Character in His Dialogues.Hallvard Fossheim - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5:239-263.
    In this essay, it is first argued that there are several important motivations for considering as wholly legitimate the question concerning the presence of Socrates in Plato’s work. After sketching how reason in Plato’s dialogues is generally portrayed as embedded in the soul as a whole, I then apply these insights in arguing that this relation between character and thinking should inform our understanding of Plato’s Socrates as well. Socrates is present in the texts because reason, according to Plato, is (...)
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  5. added 2018-06-11
    Platon Et la Question des Images.Makoto Sekimura - 2010 - Ousia.
  6. added 2018-06-08
    The Wisdom of Love or Negotiating Mythos and Logos with Plato and Levinas.Silvia Benso - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (3-4):117-128.
    Inverting the sequence of the traditional terms, in Otherwise than Being or Beyond Essence Levinas redefines philosophy as the “wisdom of love”. Through an intertwining of Platonic motifs and Levinasian inspirations, the essay argues for a mutually regulated interplay of mythos and logos as a way to regain a sense of wisdom that remains respectful of the elements of otherness in reality-in particular, respectful of the otherness of the Third who, for Levinas, constitutes the ground for politics. That is, the (...)
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  7. added 2018-04-01
    Platonic Myth and Platonic Writing.Robert Zaslavsky - 1978 - Dissertation, Graduate Faculty of the New School for Social Research
  8. added 2018-03-04
    Christopher Rowe's Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.George Rudebusch - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (1):55-62.
    The review argues that Plato makes a valid distinction between inferior hypothetical and superior unhypothetical methods. Given the distinction, the book confuses the hypothetical for unhypothetical dialectic.
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  9. added 2018-01-03
    The Last Word in Greek Philosophy.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 17-25.
    What does it take to settle an argument or debate, for the classical Greek philosophers, and how does this compare with our modern ideas about resolving disputes? Plato and Aristotle are not quite what they been reputed to be.
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  10. added 2018-01-03
    The Power of the Sophist.David Kolb - 1990 - In Postmodern Sphistications: Philosophy, Architecture, and Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago press. pp. 25 – 36.
    Plato is mistaken on both sides of his distinction between Socrates and the Sophists. He imagines the Sophists to have a formless power that cannot be resisted. This exaltation of the power of persuasion needs to be seen as motivating excessive fears in various modern debates. Pragmatic approaches can lessen our fear.
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  11. added 2017-11-12
    Plato's Concept of the Philosophic Life.Raymond V. Schoder - 1941 - Modern Schoolman 19 (1):2-7.
  12. added 2017-09-07
    ION: Plato's Defense of Poetry.Gene Fendt - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):23-50.
    Reads Ion, Plato's only dialogue on poetry as such, poetically—noting what it does as much as what it says. Doing so allows explanation of several historical anomalies and factual inconsistencies in it, and proves that the dilemma (techne/mania) of the dialogue is false; that the dilemma is intimately related to a view of language as names; that the flaw which the dialogue exhibits in the rhapsode is both moral and intellectual; that those flaws are not transferable simpliciter to the poem (...)
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  13. added 2017-03-02
    The Unexamined Student is Not Worth Teaching: Preparation, the Zone of Proximal Development, and the Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (14):1367-1380.
    ‘Scaffolded learning’ describes a cluster of instructional techniques designed to move students from a novice position toward greater understanding, such that they become independent learners. Our Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning includes two phases not normally included in discussions of scaffolded learning, the preparatory and problematizing phases. Our article will illuminate this blind spot by arguing that these crucial preliminary elements ought to be considered an integral part of a scaffolding model. If instructors are cognizant of the starting position of (...)
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  14. added 2017-03-02
    Social Dexterity in Inquity and Argumentation: An Apologia of Socrates.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2016 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 2:6-27.
    While Euthyphro and Apology are widely taught, they do not offer a complete picture of the variety of ways in which Socrates interacts with his interlocutors in Plato’s dialogues. Perhaps the most important point we wish to bring home is that most, if not all, of Socrates’ discussions are carefully calibrated according to a certain social awareness. Through careful analysis of sections of the dialogues, we argue that aspects of discussions between Socrates and his interlocutors should serve as lessons for (...)
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  15. added 2017-01-14
    The Eleusinian Mysteries in Pre-Platonic Thought. Metaphor, Practise and Imagery for Plato’s Symposium.Barbara Sattler - 2013 - In Vishwa Adluri (ed.), Greek Religion, Philosophy and Salvation. de Gruyter. pp. 151-190.
    This is part of a two-paper project to show in detail in ways that have not been attempted before that, in the Symposium, Plato uses the language and metaphors of the Eleusinian Mysteries as a template for the ascent to the Form of Beauty; and also to explain why he might have chosen to do so. The standard accounts of the Eleusinian Mysteries come from sources that have themselves been influenced by Plato and hence are unsuitable to demonstrating the extent (...)
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  16. added 2017-01-12
    Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues.John Beversluis - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a rereading of Plato's early dialogues from the point of view of the characters with whom Socrates engages in debate. Socrates' interlocutors are generally acknowledged to play important dialectical and dramatic roles, but no previous book has focused mainly on them. Existing studies are thoroughly dismissive of the interlocutors and reduce them to the status of mere mouthpieces for views which are hopelessly confused or demonstrably false. This book takes interlocutors seriously and treats them as genuine intellectual (...)
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  17. added 2016-12-12
    Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  18. added 2016-12-12
    Plato and His Predecessors: The Dramatisation of Reason.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    How does Plato view his philosophical antecedents? Plato and his Predecessors considers how Plato represents his philosophical predecessors in a late quartet of dialogues: the Theaetetus, the Sophist, the Politicus and the Philebus. Why is it that the sophist Protagoras, or the monist Parmenides, or the advocate of flux, Heraclitus, are so important in these dialogues? And why are they represented as such shadowy figures, barely present at their own refutations? The explanation, the author argues, is a complex one involving (...)
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  19. added 2016-12-12
    The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues.Ruby Blondell - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book attempts to bridge the gulf that still exists between 'literary' and 'philosophical' interpreters of Plato by looking at his use of characterization. Characterization is intrinsic to dramatic form and a concern with human character in an ethical sense pervades the dialogues on the discursive level. Form and content are further reciprocally related through Plato's discursive preoccupation with literary characterization. Two opening chapters examine the methodological issues involved in reading Plato 'as drama' and a set of questions surrounding Greek (...)
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  20. added 2016-12-12
    Genres in Dialogue: Plato and the Construct of Philosophy.Andrea Wilson Nightingale - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1995 book takes as its starting point Plato's incorporation of specific genres of poetry and rhetoric into his dialogues. The author argues that Plato's 'dialogues' with traditional genres are part and parcel of his effort to define 'philosophy'. Before Plato, 'philosophy' designated 'intellectual cultivation' in the broadest sense. When Plato appropriated the term for his own intellectual project, he created a new and specialised discipline. In order to define and legitimise 'philosophy', Plato had to match it against genres of (...)
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  21. added 2016-09-05
    Freeing Meno's Slave Boy: Scaffolded Learning in the Philosophy Classroom.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (1):25-49.
    This paper argues that a well known passage from Plato’s Meno exemplifies how to employ scaffolded learning in the philosophy classroom. It explores scaffolded learning by fully defining it, explaining it, and gesturing at some ways in which scaffolding has been implemented. We then offer our own model of scaffolded learning in terms of four phases and eight stages, and explicate our model using a well known example from Plato’s Meno as an exemplar. We believe that any practical concerns one (...)
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  22. added 2015-10-03
    Review of Marina McCoy, Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. [REVIEW]Evan Rodriguez & Ravi Sharma - 2008 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2008 (12.36).
  23. added 2015-08-25
    "No" Means "Yes": The Seduction of the Word in Plato's Phaedrus.Catherine Osborne - 1999 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):263-281.
    The motifs of love and seduction in the Phaedrus are not about sexual love but about philosophy, and particularly about two different approaches to philosophy, one engaged and emotionally, even poetically, involved and one cold, rational and detached. Socrates' palinode speech in the Phaedrus contrasts the lover of beauty whose philosophical sensitivities enable the wings to grow and intellectual vision to occur, with the cool rational character of the non-lover who has no place for love of beauty and cares only (...)
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  24. added 2015-05-01
    Euthyphro's Elenchus Experience: Ethical Expertise and Self-Knowledge. [REVIEW]Robert C. Reed - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):245-259.
    The paper argues that everyday ethical expertise requires an openness to an experience of self-doubt very different from that involved in becoming expert in other skills—namely, an experience of profound vulnerability to the Other similar to that which Emmanuel Levinas has described. Since the experience bears a striking resemblance to that of undergoing cross-examination by Socrates as depicted in Plato’s early dialogues, I illustrate it through a close reading of the Euthyphro, arguing that Euthyphro’s vaunted “expertise” conceals a reluctance to (...)
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  25. added 2015-05-01
    Socrates and Philosophy in the Dialogues of Plato. By Sandra Peterson.Naomi Reshotko - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):433-440.
  26. added 2015-05-01
    Plato's Socrates as Educator.Heather L. Reid - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (2):188-192.
  27. added 2015-04-30
    Therapeia, Plato's Conception of Philosophy. [REVIEW]P. R. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 12 (1):143-143.
  28. added 2015-04-29
    Plato and the "Socratic Fallacy".William Prior - 1998 - Phronesis 43 (2):97 - 113.
    Since Peter Geach coined the phrase in 1966 there has been much discussion among scholars of the "Socratic fallacy." No consensus presently exists on whether Socrates commits the "Socratic fallacy"; almost all scholars agree, however, that the "Socratic fallacy" is a bad thing and that Socrates has good reason to avoid it. I think that this consensus of scholars is mistaken. I think that what Geach has labeled a fallacy is no fallacy at all, but a perfectly innocent consequence of (...)
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  29. added 2015-04-29
    The State of the Question in the Study of Plato.Gerald A. Press - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 34 (4):507-532.
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  30. added 2015-04-26
    To What Extent Can Definitions Help Our Understanding? What Plato Might Have Said in His Cups.John W. Powell - 2012 - Metaphilosophy 43 (5):698-713.
    There are grounds for taking Plato's agenda of searching for definitions to be ironic, and he points toward good arguments for being wary of trust in definitions.
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  31. added 2015-04-26
    Aporia and Searching in Early Plato.Vasilis Politis - 2006 - In Lindsay Judson & V. Karasmanēs (eds.), Remembering Socrates: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
  32. added 2015-04-22
    The Being of the Beautiful: Plato's Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesman. Plato - 2007 - University of Chicago Press.
    The Being of the Beautiful collects Plato’s three dialogues, the Theaetetus, Sophist, and Statesmen, in which Socrates formulates his conception of philosophy while preparing for trial.
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  33. added 2015-04-20
    Politics, Philosophy, Writing Plato's Art of Caring for Souls.Zdravko Planinc - 2001
  34. added 2015-04-19
    Spiritual Pregnancy in Plato's Symposium.E. E. Pender - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):72-.
    Although Plato's notion of spiritual pregnancy has received a great deal of critical attention in recent years, the development of the metaphor in the Symposium has not been fully analysed. Close attention to the details of the image reveals two important points which have so far been overlooked: There are two quite different types of spiritual pregnancy in the Symposium: a ‘male’ type, which is analogous to the build-up to physical ejaculation, and a ‘female’ type, which is analogous to the (...)
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  35. added 2015-04-17
    Socrates, Rationality, and the Daimonion.John Partridge - 2008 - Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):285-309.
  36. added 2015-04-16
    Socrates in the Platonic Dialogues.Catherine Osborne - 2006 - Philosophical Investigations 29 (1):1–21.
    If Socrates is portrayed holding one view in one of Plato's dialogues and a different view in another, should we be puzzled? If (as I suggest) Plato's Socrates is neither the historical Socrates, nor a device for delivering Platonic doctrine, but a tool for the dialectical investigation of a philosophical problem, then we should expect a new Socrates, with relevant commitments, to be devised for each setting. Such a dialectical device – the tailor-made Socrates – fits with what we know (...)
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  37. added 2015-04-15
    Doing Some Good to Friends.R. Michael Olson - 2011 - Journal of Philosophical Research 36:149-172.
    In this article I interpret the conversation that takes place between Socrates and Polemarchus in Book One of the Republic according to its dramatic logic by examining the rhetorical artfulness that informs Socrates’ argumentative tactics. After first examining Polemarchus’s character as obedient spiritedness, I then turn to the argument, showing that Socrates does not undermine Polemarchus’s original opinion but, rather, by making legitimate use of the analogy between justice and technē, moves him to attend to the useful knowledge implicit in (...)
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  38. added 2015-04-15
    Essences and Discovery: Plato, Locke, and Leibniz.Douglas Odegard - 1964 - Dialogue 3 (3):219-234.
  39. added 2015-04-15
    Plato's Conception of Philosophy.Robert G. North - 1938 - Modern Schoolman 15 (2):42-42.
  40. added 2015-04-14
    "Plato: The Midwife's Apprentice," by I. M. Crombie.Harry Neumann - 1966 - Modern Schoolman 43 (3):278-280.
  41. added 2015-04-14
    Regress Arguments in Plato.G. C. Nerlich - 1960 - Mind 69 (273):88-90.
  42. added 2015-04-12
    Plato, Inquiry, and Painting.Michael L. Morgan - 1990 - Apeiron 23 (2):121 - 145.
  43. added 2015-04-12
    SPRAGUE, R. K. - "Plato's Use of Fallacy". [REVIEW]J. M. E. Moravesik - 1964 - Mind 73:142.
  44. added 2015-04-11
    Kenneth M. Sayre, Metaphysics and Method in Plato's Statesman Reviewed By.Patrick Mooney - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (4):296-298.
  45. added 2015-04-09
    Plato as Author: The Rhetoric of Philosophy.Ann N. Michelini (ed.) - 2003 - Brill.
    This collection presents stimulating and diverse essays by scholars from several different fields; the contributors have made important contributions to the ...
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  46. added 2015-04-08
    Plato and the Art of Philosophical Writing.Marina McCoy - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):203-208.
  47. added 2015-04-08
    Alcidamas, Isocrates, and Plato on Speech, Writing, and Philosophical Rhetoric.Marina Berzins McCoy - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):45-66.
  48. added 2015-04-08
    Reason and Dialectic in the Argument Against Protagoras in the Theaetetus.Marina Berzins McCoy - 2005 - International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (1):21-39.
    This paper examines Socrates’ refutation of Protagoras’s view of knowledge in the Theaetetus (151e–186e). I show that the argument against Protagoras is not intended to be a purely abstract one about inconsistent premises. Instead, Socrates’ success in argumentagainst Protagoras depends upon Theaetetus’s character and his beliefs about knowledge and expertise. I also explore how understanding that section of the dialogue in this way better exhibits Socrates’ description of himself as akin to a midwife. Plato affirms a notion of the “rational” (...)
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  49. added 2015-04-08
    Plato and the Method of Analysis.Stephen Menn - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (3):193-223.
    Late ancient Platonists and Aristotelians describe the method of reasoning to first principles as "analysis." This is a metaphor from geometrical practice. How far back were philosophers taking geometric analysis as a model for philosophy, and what work did they mean this model to do? After giving a logical description of analysis in geometry, and arguing that the standard (not entirely accurate) late ancient logical description of analysis was already familiar in the time of Plato and Aristotle, I argue that (...)
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  50. added 2015-04-08
    Socrates on Simonides: The Use of Poetry in Socratic and Platonic Rhetoric.Marina Berzins McCoy - 1999 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 32 (4):349 - 367.
1 — 50 / 169