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  1. Optimality and Teleology in Aristotle's Natural Science.Devin Henry - manuscript
    In this paper I examine the role of optimality reasoning in Aristotle’s natural science. By “optimality reasoning” I mean reasoning that appeals to some conception of “what is best” in order to explain why things are the way they are. We are first introduced to this pattern of reasoning in the famous passage at Phaedo 97b8-98a2, where (Plato’s) Socrates invokes “what is best” as a cause (aitia) of things in nature. This passage can be seen as the intellectual ancestor of (...)
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  2. Espaces lisses et lieux bruts: L'histoire cachée du lieu.Edward S. Casey - forthcoming - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale.
    L'étude entend montrer que, si le temps est finalement unique, l'espace, lui, est originellement (et non du fait de la constitution de l'être-au-monde) multiple. Une analyse d'un passage du Timée où la Chôra est dite tithênê (nourrice) permet d'asseoir une interprétation de la différence foncière entre espace et lieu. Le lieu a progressivement disparu pour s'absorber dans l'espace neutre qui traduit homologiquement l'infinité divine ou pour s'atténuer dans le site. Il est difficile de trouver une analyse adéquate du lieu depuis (...)
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  3. The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity.Devin Henry - forthcoming - In Georgia Irby (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The intellectual history of evolutionary theory really does not begin in earnest until the late seventeenth/early eighteenth century. Prior to that, the idea that species might have evolved over time was not a serious possibility for most naturalists and philosophers. There is certainly no substantive debate in antiquity about evolution in the modern sense. There were really only two competing explanations for how living things came to have the parts they do: design or blind chance. Ancient Greek Atomism, for example, (...)
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  4. Cohesive Causes in Ancient Greek Philosophy and Medicine.Sean Michael Pead Coughlin - 2020 - In Chiara Thumiger (ed.), Holism in Ancient Medicine and Its Reception. Leiden: pp. 237-267.
    This paper is about the history of a question in ancient Greek philosophy and medicine: what holds the parts of a whole together? The idea that there is a single cause responsible for cohesion is usually associated with the Stoics. They refer to it as the synectic cause (αἴτιον συνεκτικόν), a term variously translated as ‘cohesive cause,’ ‘containing cause’ or ‘sustaining cause.’ The Stoics, however, are neither the first nor the only thinkers to raise this question or to propose a (...)
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  5. Os Princípios Explicativos no Timeu de Platão.Luciana Valesca Fabião Chachá - 2018 - Dissertation, UFRJ, Brazil
  6. How Natural is a Unified Notion of Time? Temporal Experience in Early Greek Thought.Barbara Michaela Sattler - 2017 - In I. Philips (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Temporal Experience: Routledge Handbooks in Philosophy. Routledge.
    Whatever our metaphysics of time, today we usually work with the assumption that we have one unified temporal framework, which allows for situating all events, processes, and happenings in the sense that we can put them all in a temporal relation to each other; they are all either before, after, or simultaneous with each other. In this paper, I show that for the early Greeks, by contrast, the very idea of such a unified notion of time would be foreign; instead, (...)
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  7. Plutarch on the Geometry of the Elements.Jan2 Opsomer - 2015 - In Luc Van der Stockt & Michiel Meeusen (eds.), Aspects of Plutarch’s Natural Philosophy.
    Plutarch is committed to geometric atomism, the Platonic theory that derives the material elements from regular polyhedric shapes. An essential feature of this theory is that qualitative properties are not primitive, but supervene on more fundamental, quantitatively describable properties, such as the size, shape, mass or weight of the atoms, their solidity, position, arrangement and kinetic interactions. Plutarch recognises that the geometric account provides the causal explanation for phenomenal and other qualitative properties. He praises Plato and Democritus for their theoretical (...)
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  8. Plato on Necessity and Disorder.Olof Pettersson - 2013 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China (BRILL) 8 (4):546-565.
    In the Timaeus, Plato makes a distinction between reason and necessity. This distinction is often accounted for as a distinction between two types of causation: purpose oriented causation and mechanistic causation. While reason is associated with the soul and taken to bring about its effects with the good and the beautiful as the end, necessity is understood in terms of a set of natural laws pertaining to material things. In this paper I shall suggest that there are reasons to reconsider (...)
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  9. Creatio Ex Nihilo – a Genuinely Philosophical Insight Derived From Plato and Aristotle? Some Notes on the Treatise on the Harmony Between the Two Sages.Benjamin Gleede - 2012 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 22 (1):91-117.
    The article aims at demonstrating that in attributing the creatio ex nihilo to both Plato and Aristotle as their unanimous philosophical conviction the Treatise on the Harmony between the Two Sages deeply depends upon the Neoplatonic reading of those two philosophers. The main obstacles for such a view in the works of the two sages are Plato's assumption of a precosmic chaos in the Timaeus and Aristotle's denial of any efficient causality to the unmoved mover in the Metaphysics. Both of (...)
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  10. The Nature of Place and the Place of Nature in Plato’s Timaeus and Aristotle’s Physics.Emma R. Jones - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):247-268.
    I offer a comparison between Plato’s discussion of χώρα in the Timaeus at 48A–53C and Aristotle’s discussion of τόπος in Physics Book IV, arguing that the two accounts have more in common than has been suggested by Continental scholars. Τόπος and χώρα both signal what I call the impasse of place as the question of that which cannot be reduced to either the sensible or the intelligible, and which grounds such categories. Identifying this impasse reveals Plato’s and Aristotle’s accounts of (...)
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  11. The Constitution of the Human Body in Plato’s Timaeus.Filip Karfík - 2012 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):167-181.
    The author emphasizes the fact that the largest part of Plato’s Timaeus deals with human nature and offers a detailed account of the constitution of the human body. He then lists the parallels and the differences between the constitution of the world body and the human body. The central part of the paper deals with Plato’s explanation of the persistence of the human body within a bodily environment which causes its dissolution. The author pays a special attention to Plato’s theory (...)
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  12. A Likely Account of Necessity: Plato's Receptacle as a Physical and Metaphysical Foundation for Space.Barbara Sattler - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):159-195.
    This paper aims to show that—and how—Plato’s notion of the receptacle in the Timaeus provides the conditions for developing a mathematical as well as a physical space without itself being space. In response to the debate whether Plato’s receptacle is a conception of space or of matter, I suggest employing criteria from topology and the theory of metric spaces as the most basic ones available. I show that the receptacle fulfils its main task–allowing the elements qua images of the Forms (...)
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  13. Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus.Sarah Broadie - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Timaeus is one of the most influential and challenging works of ancient philosophy to have come down to us. Sarah Broadie's rich and compelling study proposes new interpretations of major elements of the Timaeus, including the separate Demiurge, the cosmic 'beginning', the 'second mixing', the Receptacle and the Atlantis story. Broadie shows how Plato deploys the mythic themes of the Timaeus to convey fundamental philosophical insights and examines the profoundly differing methods of interpretation which have been brought to bear (...)
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  14. Pre-Cosmic Necessity in Plato's Timaeus.Elizabeth Jelinek - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (3):287-305.
  15. The Order Question.Richard Foley - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):57-72.
  16. Democrito E L’Accademia. Studi Sulla Trasmissione Dell’Atomismo Antico da Aristotele a Simplicio. [REVIEW]Lorenzo Perilli - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):412-415.
  17. The Stoics on Matter and Prime Matter : Corporealism and Theimprint of Plato's Timaeus.Jean-Baptiste Gourinat - 2009 - In Ricardo Salles (ed.), God and Cosmos in Stoicism. Oxford University Press. pp. 46--70.
  18. Embodying Intelligence: Animals and Us in Plato’s Timaeus.Amber Carpenter - 2008 - In Jure Zovko & John Dillon (eds.), Platonism and Forms of Intelligence. Akademie Verlag. pp. 39-58.
  19. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the Timaeus-Critias. [REVIEW]Catherine Osborne - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (4):610-614.
  20. Intelligibility in Nature, Art and Episteme.John P. Anton - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:3-9.
    The architectonic principle, as stated in Aristotle's Politics, is related to the arrangement of the arts, the technai, whereby it is argued that the leading art is the politike techne. Plato, in the Gorgias, has argued for an architectonic of crafts. Four technai provide the best, aei pros to beltiston therapeuousai, and they differ from the pseudo-crafts that offer pleasure while indifferent to the beltiston. The principle for arranging the architectonic is the pursuit of the best, whereby each practitioner of (...)
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  21. Plato's Natural Philosophy: A Study of the 'Timaeus–Critias' – Thomas Kjeller Johansen.Scott Carson - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):131-133.
  22. Sacred Doorways: Tracing the Body in Plato’s Timaeus.Jena G. Jolissaint - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):333-352.
    This paper develops a structural parallel between the maternal/feminine body in Greek mythology and the figure of the body in Plato’s Timaeus. HistoricallyPlato is often portrayed as a thinker who is concerned with the corporeal only insofar as philosophy is engaged in transcending bodily limitations. Yet the Timaeus is not engaged in producing a dualistic opposition between the intelligible and the sensible, nor is Platonic philosophy a rejection of life in favor of the perfect wisdom that comes with death. The (...)
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  23. (T.K.) Johansen Plato's Natural Philosophy. A Study of the Timaeus-Critias. Cambridge UP, 2004. Pp. Vi + 218. £45. 0521790670. [REVIEW]Jenny Bryan - 2006 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:210-.
  24. Plato’s Natural Philosophy.John Dillon - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):408-411.
  25. Plato’s Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW]John Dillon - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):408 - 411.
  26. Plato's Natural Philosophy. A Study of the Timaeus–Critias. [REVIEW]James G. Lennox - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):57-59.
  27. Symmetry and Asymmetry in the Construction of 'Elements' in the Timaeus.D. R. Lloyd - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (02):459-.
  28. Plato on Necessity and Chaos.Andrew S. Mason - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 127 (2):283-298.
  29. Plato's Cosmic Teleology.Gábor Betegh - 2005 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 2:255-269.
    A Critical Notice of Thomas KjellerJohansen, Plato’s Natural Philosophy. A Study of the Timaeus-Critias.
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  30. On the Use of Stoicheion in the Sense of 'Element'.Timothy J. Crowley - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 29:367-394.
  31. Causation in the Phaedo.Sean Kelsey - 2004 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (1):21–43.
    In the _Phaedo Socrates says that as a young man he thought it a great thing to know the causes of things; but finding existing accounts unsatisfying, he fell back on a method of his own, hypothesizing that Forms are causes. I argue that part of what this hypothesis says is that certain phenomena--the ones for which it postulates Forms as causes--are the result of processes whose object was to produce them. I then use this conclusion to explain how Socrates' (...)
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  32. À quelles conditions peut-on parler de « matière » dans le Timée de Platon ?Luc Brisson - 2003 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 1 (1):5-21.
    Dans le Timée, l'hypothèse de la khó̱ra, qu'il faut se garder d'identifier avec la húle̱ aristotélicienne, permet de rendre compte du fait que les choses sensibles sont radicalement différentes de leur modèle intelligible. Or, la constitution mathématique des éléments à partir de la khó̱ra mène à la contradiction suivante : dans l'univers platonicien, il faut tenir compte à la fois du continu qui doit caractériser la khó̱ra, et du discontinu qu'instaurent inéluctablement les polyèdres réguliers auxquels sont associés les éléments. La (...)
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  33. Kretanje Zvukova, Tijela I Duša [Platon, Zakoni VII. 790e I D.]: Motions of Sounds, Bodies, and Souls [Plato, Laws VII. 790e Ff.]. [REVIEW]Evangelos Moutsopoulos - 2002 - Prolegomena 1 (2):113-119.
    This article explores how Plato, in his “metaphysical” dialogues, sees the specific properties of motion , which lend themselves to adaptation for the purposes of maintaining or restoring the health of the soul. Plato explores the property of regular or rhythmic motion in particular. The attention has been drawn to the analogy between the calming effect of music, at the human level, and the Demiurge’s achievement in willing the world into existence. The focus of the article lays on the Laws, (...)
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  34. Plato and the Environment.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 1998 - Environmental Ethics 20 (2):115-133.
    In this paper, I set out to refute several charges that have recently been raised against Plato’s attitude toward the environment and to present him under a new light of relevance for the contemporary environmental debate. For this purpose, I assess the meaning of Plato’s metaphysical dualism, his notion of nature and teleology, and the kind of value that he attributes to animals, plants, and the land in general. I thus show how Plato’s organicist view of the universe endows it (...)
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  35. Plato and the Arrow of Time.Owen Goldin - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):125-143.
  36. The 'Problem of Fire'.David P. Hunt - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):69-80.
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  37. Plato on the Self Moving Soul.Andrew Mason - 1998 - Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1-2):18-28.
  38. Platonic Ecology: A Response To Plumwood's Critique of Plato.Timothy A. Mahoney - 1997 - Ethics and the Environment 2 (1):25 - 41.
    This is a response to Val Plumwood's critique of Plato and an overview of the way in which Plato provides a viable environmental vision. This vision sees the realm of nature as rooted in the realm of logos, and human beings as sojourners who are nonetheless integral parts of nature and whose vocation is to act as mediators between the two realms thereby bringing nature into even greater participation in logos. To fulfill the human vocation, one must come to an (...)
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  39. Astronomy and Observation in Plato's Republic.Andrew Gregory - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (4):451-471.
    Plato's comments on astronomy and the education of the guardians at Republic 528e ff have been hotly disputed, and have provoked much criticism from those who have interpreted them as a rejection or denigration of observational astronomy. Here I argue that the key to interpreting these comments lies in the relationship between the conception of enquiry that is implicit in the epistemological allegories, and the programme for the education of the guardians that Plato subsequently proposes. We have, I suggest, been (...)
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  40. Origins and Species: A Study of the Historical Sources of Darwinism and the Contexts of Some Other Accounts of Organic Diversity From Plato and Aristotle On.M. J. S. Hodge - 1991 - Garland.
  41. Probabilistic Causality From a Dynamical Point of View.Jan Plato - 1990 - Topoi 9 (2):101-108.
  42. Nature, Knowledge, and Virtue, Essays in Memory of Joan Kung.Terry Penner & Richard Kraut (eds.) - 1989 - Academin printing and publishing.
  43. Plato on Perception: A Reply to Professor Turnbull,“Becoming and Intelligibility”.Gail Fine - 1988 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:15-28.
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  44. Matter and Flux in Plato's Timaeus.Mary Louise Gill - 1987 - Phronesis 32 (1):34-53.
  45. Plato on the Unknowability of the Sensible World.Richard J. Ketchum - 1987 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (3):291 - 305.
  46. Plato on Kinds of Animals.David B. Kitts - 1987 - Biology and Philosophy 2 (3):315-328.
    Some biologists and philosophers of biology have seen in Plato an especially objectionable version of essentialism or topology. Although kinds of animals are mentioned in almost all of Plato's dialogues, in none of them is there an explicity stated doctrine of animal kinds. An examination of the dialogues has, moreover, failed to reveal some implicit but consistent and unambiguous view of kinds that Plato might have held.
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  47. Plato on Instability and Knowledge.Thomas Digby - 1984 - Apeiron 18 (1):42 - 45.
  48. Du Temps Chez Platon Et Aristote R. Brague Coll. Epiméthée Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1982. 181 P.Yvon Lafrance - 1983 - Dialogue 22 (2):356-360.
  49. Hippocrate, Platon, Aristote Et Les Notions de Genre Et D'Espèce.Fernand Robert - 1982 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 4 (2):173 - 201.
  50. Forms, Nature, and the Good in the Philebus.J. M. Moravcsik - 1979 - Phronesis 24 (1):81-104.
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