Results for 'Emily Robbins'

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  1.  20
    Which Benefits of Research Participation Count as 'Direct'?Alexander Friedman, Emily Robbins & David Wendler - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (2):60-67.
    It is widely held that individuals who are unable to provide informed consent should be enrolled in clinical research only when the risks are low, or the research offers them the prospect of direct benefit. There is now a rich literature on when the risks of clinical research are low enough to enroll individuals who cannot consent. Much less attention has focused on which benefits of research participation count as ‘direct’, and the few existing accounts disagree over how this crucial (...)
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  2.  24
    Response From Killcross, Robbins and Everitt.S. Killcross, T. W. Robbins & B. J. Everitt - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (7):244-246.
  3. The Cosmopolitan Paradox: Response to Robbins: With Reply to Chandler.David Chandler & Bruce Robbins - 2003 - Radical Philosophy 118.
     
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  4.  48
    Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Ins and Outs of Introspection.Philip Robbins - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1100-1102.
    Philosophical interest in introspection has a long and storied history, but only recently – with the 'scientific turn' in philosophy of mind – have philosophers sought to ground their accounts of introspection in psychological data. In particular, there is growing awareness of how evidence from clinical and developmental psychology might be brought to bear on long-standing debates about the architecture of introspection, especially in the form of apparent dissociations between introspection and third-person mental-state attribution. It is less often noticed that (...)
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  5.  11
    In Ordained Ministry There Is Neither Male nor Female? The Personality Profile of Male and Female Anglican Clergy Engaged in Multi-Parish Rural Ministry.Mandy Robbins, Christine E. Brewster & Leslie J. Francis - 2011 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (2):241-251.
    Robbins, Francis, and Rutledge documented the personality profile of Church of England clergymen and clergywomen prior to the ordination of the first women to the priesthood in 1994, drawing on Eysenck’s three-dimensional model of personality. They found that the personality profiles of clergymen and clergywomen were indistinguishable. The present paper reports a comparable study conducted in 2004 among 182 clergywomen and 540 clergymen serving in similar parochial posts in order to examine whether the ordination of women to the priesthood (...)
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  6. Radical Democracy and Political Theology.Jeffrey W. Robbins - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Alexis de Tocqueville once wrote that "the people reign over the American political world like God over the universe," unwittingly casting democracy as the political instantiation of the death of God. According to Jeffrey W. Robbins, Tocqueville's assessment remains an apt observation of modern democratic power, which does not rest with a sovereign authority but operates as a diffuse social force. By linking radical democratic theory to a contemporary fascination with political theology, Robbins envisions the modern experience of (...)
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  7. Radical Theology: A Vision for Change.Jeffrey W. Robbins - 2016 - Indiana University Press.
    "Radical theology" and "political theology" are terms that have gained a lot of currency among philosophers of religion today. In this visionary new book, Jeffrey W. Robbins explores the contemporary direction of these movements as he charts a course for their future. Robbins claims that radical theology is no longer bound by earlier thinking about God and that it must be conceived of as postsecular and postliberal. As he engages with themes of liberation, gender, and race, Robbins (...)
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  8. The Beneficiary.Bruce Robbins - 2017 - Duke University Press.
    From iPhones and clothing to jewelry and food, the products those of us in the developed world consume and enjoy exist only through the labor and suffering of countless others. In his new book Bruce Robbins examines the implications of this dynamic for humanitarianism and social justice. He locates the figure of the "beneficiary" in the history of humanitarian thought, which asks the prosperous to help the poor without requiring them to recognize their causal role in the creation of (...)
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  9.  25
    Inhibition and the Right Inferior Frontal Cortex: One Decade On.Adam R. Aron, Trevor W. Robbins & Russell A. Poldrack - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (4):177-185.
  10. Experimental Philosophy.Wesley Buckwalter, Joshua Knobe, Shaun Nichols, N. Ángel Pinillos, Philip Robbins, Hagop Sarkissian, Chris Weigel & Jonathan M. Weinberg - 2012 - Oxford Bibliographies Online (1):81-92.
    Bibliography of works in experimental philosophy.
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  11.  51
    Inhibition and the Right Inferior Frontal Cortex.A. R. Aron, T. W. Robbins & R. A. Poldrack - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):170-177.
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  12. The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition.Murat Aydede & P. Robbins (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Since its inception some fifty years ago, cognitive science has seen a number of sea changes. Perhaps the best known is the development of connectionist models of cognition as an alternative to classical, symbol-based approaches. A more recent - and increasingly influential - trend is that of dynamical-systems-based, ecologically oriented models of the mind. Researchers suggest that a full understanding of the mind will require systematic study of the dynamics of interaction between mind, body, and world. Some argue that this (...)
     
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  13.  47
    Modularity of Mind.Philip Robbins - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14. Experimental Philosophy.Joshua Knobe, Wesley Buckwalter, Philip Robbins, Hagop Sarkissian, Tamler Sommers & Shaun Nichols - 2012 - Annual Review of Psychology 63 (50):72-73.
    Experimental philosophy is a new interdisciplinary field that uses methods normally associated with psychology to investigate questions normally associated with philosophy. The present review focuses on research in experimental philosophy on four central questions. First, why is it that people's moral judgments appear to influence their intuitions about seemingly nonmoral questions? Second, do people think that moral questions have objective answers, or do they see morality as fundamentally relative? Third, do people believe in free will, and do they see free (...)
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  15. The Phenomenal Stance.Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 127 (1):59-85.
    Cognitive science is shamelessly materialistic. It maintains that human beings are nothing more than complex physical systems, ultimately and completely explicable in mechanistic terms. But this conception of humanity does not ?t well with common sense. To think of the creatures we spend much of our day loving, hating, admiring, resenting, comparing ourselves to, trying to understand, blaming, and thanking -- to think of them as mere mechanisms seems at best counterintuitive and unhelpful. More often it may strike us as (...)
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  16.  41
    Neurocognitive Endophenotypes of Impulsivity and Compulsivity: Towards Dimensional Psychiatry.Trevor W. Robbins, Claire M. Gillan, Dana G. Smith, Sanne de Wit & Karen D. Ersche - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):81-91.
  17. Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction.Paul Robbins - 2004 - Blackwell.
    The hatchet and the seed -- A tree with deep roots -- The critical tools -- A field crystallizes -- Destruction of nature -- Construction of nature -- Degradation and marginalization -- Conservation and control -- Environmental conflict -- Environmental identity and social movement -- Where to now?
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  18. Are Frege Cases Exceptions to Intentional Generalizations?Murat Aydede & P. Robbins - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):1-22.
    This piece criticizes Fodor's argument (in The Elm and the Expert, 1994) for the claim that Frege cases should be treated as exceptions to (broad) psychological generalizations rather than as counterexamples.
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  19.  34
    Serotoninergic Regulation of Emotional and Behavioural Control Processes.Roshan Cools, Angela C. Roberts & Trevor W. Robbins - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):31-40.
  20.  3
    No Face-Like Processing for Objects-of-Expertise in Three Behavioural Tasks.Rachel Robbins & Elinor McKone - 2007 - Cognition 103 (1):34-79.
  21.  67
    How to Blunt the Sword of Compositionality.Philip Robbins - 2002 - Noûs 36 (2):313-334.
  22.  66
    The Phenomenal Stance Revisited.Anthony I. Jack & Philip Robbins - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (3):383-403.
    In this article, we present evidence of a bidirectional coupling between moral concern and the attribution of properties and states that are associated with experience (e.g., conscious awareness, feelings). This coupling is also shown to be stronger with experience than for the attribution of properties and states more closely associated with agency (e.g., free will, thoughts). We report the results of four studies. In the first two studies, we vary the description of the mental capacities of a creature, and assess (...)
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  23. Response to Simon Susen's “Bourdieusian Reflections on Language: Unavoidable Conditions of the Real Speech Situation”.Derek Robbins - 2013 - Social Epistemology 27 (3-4):261-274.
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  24.  32
    The Ins and Outs of Introspection.Philip Robbins - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (6):617–630.
  25.  12
    The Scientists Think and the Public Feels.Guy Cook, Elisa Pieri & Peter Robbins - 2004 - Discourse Society 15 (4):433-49.
    Debates about new technologies, such as crop and food genetic modification, raise pressing questions about the ways ‘experts’ and ‘ nonexperts’ communicate. These debates are dynamic, characterized by many voices contesting numerous storylines. The discoursal features, including language choices and communication strategies, of the GM debate are in some ways taken for granted and in others actively manipulated by participants. Although there are many voices, some have more influence than others. This study makes use of 50 hours of in-depth interviews (...)
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  26.  88
    Bergson and the Holographic Theory of Mind.Stephen E. Robbins - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (3-4):365-394.
    Bergson’s model of time (1889) is perhaps the proto-phenomenological theory. It is part of a larger model of mind (1896) which can be seen in modern light as describing the brain as supporting a modulated wave within a holographic field, specifying the external image of the world, and wherein subject and object are differentiated not in terms of space, but of time. Bergson’s very concrete model is developed and deepened with Gibson’s ecological model of perception. It is applied to the (...)
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  27.  38
    Varieties of Self-Systems Worth Having.Pascal Boyer, Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):647-660.
  28. Consciousness and the Social Mind.Philip Robbins - 2008 - Cognitive Systems Research 9 (1-2):15-23.
  29. To Structure, or Not to Structure?Philip Robbins - 2004 - Synthese 139 (1):55-80.
    Some accounts of mental content represent the objects of belief as structured, using entities that formally resemble the sentences used to express and report attitudes in natural language; others adopt a relatively unstructured approach, typically using sets or functions. Currently popular variants of the latter include classical and neo-classical propositionalism, which represent belief contents as sets of possible worlds and sets of centered possible worlds, respectively; and property self-ascriptionism, which employs sets of possible individuals. I argue against their contemporary proponents (...)
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  30. Murphy on Postmodernity, Science, and Religion.J. Wesley Robbins - 1998 - Zygon 33 (3):463-466.
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  31.  21
    On Time, Memory and Dynamic Form.S. E. Robbins - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):762-788.
    A common approach to explaining the perception of form is through the use of static features. The weakness of this approach points naturally to dynamic definitions of form. Considering dynamical form, however, leads inevitably to the need to explain how events are perceived as time-extended—a problem with primacy over that even of qualia. Optic flow models, energy models, models reliant on a rigidity constraint are examined. The reliance of these models on the instantaneous specification of form at an instant, t, (...)
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  32.  51
    Decision-Making Deficits in Drug Addiction.Luke Clark & Trevor W. Robbins - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):361-363.
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  33.  10
    Ethicist as Designer: A Pragmatic Approach to Ethics in the Lab.Aimee van Wynsberghe & Scott Robbins - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):947-961.
    Contemporary literature investigating the significant impact of technology on our lives leads many to conclude that ethics must be a part of the discussion at an earlier stage in the design process i.e., before a commercial product is developed and introduced. The problem, however, is the question regarding how ethics can be incorporated into an earlier stage of technological development and it is this question that we argue has not yet been answered adequately. There is no consensus amongst scholars as (...)
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  34. The Case for Qualia. [REVIEW]Stephen E. Robbins - 2010 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (1-2):141-156.
    This is a review of "The Case for Qualia" (Ed., Edmund Wright). The review is in three parts. In Part 1, I briefly lay out the general metaphysic in which the debate on qualia has been unfolding. I term it the classical or spatial metaphysic. In Part 2, we traverse the essays and relate them – the problems with which they grapple, the pitfalls they encounter – to this classic metaphysic. In Part 3, I will briefly sketch out a transformed (...)
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  35. Pragmatism, Critical Realism, and the Cognitive Value of Religion and Science.J. Wesley Robbins - 1999 - Zygon 34 (4):655-666.
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  36.  13
    Semantic Redintegration: Ecological Invariance.Stephen E. Robbins - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):726-727.
    In proposing that their model can operate in the concrete, perceptual world, Rogers & McClelland (R&M) have not done justice to the complexities of the ecological sphere and its invariance laws. The structure of concrete events forces a different framework, both for retrieval of events and concepts defined across events, than that upon which the proposed model, rooted in essence in the verbal learning tradition, implicitly rests.
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  37.  2
    French Post-War Social Theory: International Knowledge Transfer.Derek Robbins - 2012 - Sage Publications.
    Introduction -- Raymond Aron (1905-83) -- Louis Althusser (1918-90) -- Michel Foucault (1926-84) -- Jean-Franc̜ois Lyotard (1924-98) -- Pierre Bourdieu (1930-2002) -- Preliminary concluding comments.
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  38.  22
    Adaptation and Face Perception: How Aftereffects Implicate Norm-Based Coding of Faces.Gillian Rhodes, Rachel Robbins, Emma Jaquet, Elinor McKone, Linda Jeffery & Colin Wg Clifford - 2005 - In Colin W. G. Clifford & Gillian Rhodes (eds.), Fitting the Mind to the World: Adaptation and After-Effects in High-Level Vision. Oxford University Press.
  39. Broken-Backed Naturalism.J. Wesley Robbins - 1997 - Zygon 32 (4):585-592.
    While reading, and thinking about how to respond to, Willem Drees’s Religion, Science and Naturalism, I was reminded of an earlier dispute between George Santayana and John Dewey about, among other things, how to incorporate religion into a naturalistic world view. Dewey described Santayana’s naturalism as "broken backed" because of his dualistic distinction between the mechanism of nature and the life of the mind and his relegation of religion to the latter, epiphenomenal realm.
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  40. Can Holistic Processing Be Learned for Inverted Faces?Rachel Robbins & Elinor McKone - 2003 - Cognition 88 (1):79-107.
  41.  33
    Cognitive Functions and Corticostriatal Circuits: Insights From Huntington's Disease.Andrew D. Lawrence, Barbara J. Sahakian & Trevor W. Robbins - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):379-388.
  42.  85
    Seriously, but Not Literally: Pragmatism and Realism in Religion and Science.J. Wesley Robbins - 1988 - Zygon 23 (3):229-245.
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  43.  9
    Philosophy and the Social Sciences: Bourdieu, Merleau-Ponty and Husserl.Derek Robbins - 2012 - Cités 51:17-31.
  44. Modularity and Mental Architecture.Philip Robbins - 2013 - WIREs Cognitive Science 4 (6):641-648.
     
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  45.  43
    Decision Making and Neuropsychiatry.S. Rahman, B. Sahakia, R. Cardinal, R. Rogers & T. Robbins - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):271-277.
  46.  25
    “No One Shall Be Held in Slavery or Servitude”: A Critical Analysis of International Slavery Agreements and Concepts of Slavery. [REVIEW]Kevin Bales & Peter T. Robbins - 2001 - Human Rights Review 2 (2):18-45.
    No international agreement has been completely effective in reducing slavery. This stems in part from the evolution of slavery agreements and the inclination on the part of the authors of conventions to include other practices as part of the slavery defintion, resulting in a confusion of the practices and definitions of slavery. What has been missing is a classification that is dynamic and yet sufficiently universal to identify slavery no matter how it evolves. We have attempted to build on theories (...)
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  47. Blaming the System.Bruce Robbins - 2011 - In David Palumbo-Liu, Bruce Robbins & Nirvana Tanoukhi (eds.), Immanuel Wallerstein and the Problem of the World: System, Scale, Culture. Duke University Press.
     
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  48.  31
    Virtual Action: O'Regan & Noë Meet Bergson.Stephen E. Robbins - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):906-907.
    Bergson, writing in 1896, anticipated “sensorimotor contingencies” under the concept that perception is “virtual action.” But to explain the external image, he embedded this concept in a holographic framework where time-motion is an indivisible and the relation of subject/object is in terms of time. The target article's account of qualitative visual experience falls short for lack of this larger framework. [Objects] send back, then, to my body, as would a mirror, their eventual influence; they take rank in an order corresponding (...)
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  49.  87
    A Neopragmatist Perspective on Religion and Science.J. Wesley Robbins - 1993 - Zygon 28 (3):337-349.
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  50.  22
    The Illusory Triumph of Machine Over Mind: Wegner's Eliminativism and the Real Promise of Psychology.Anthony I. Jack & Philip Robbins - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):665-666.
    Wegner's thesis that the experience of will is an illusion is not just wrong, it is an impediment to progress in psychology. We discuss two readings of Wegner's thesis and find that neither can motivate his larger conclusion. Wegner thinks science requires us to dismiss our experiences. Its real promise is to help us to make better sense of them.
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