Results for 'Jonathan Charles Cole'

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  1.  32
    Hallucinations and Antipsychotics: The Role of the 5-HT2A Receptor.Andrew James Goudie & Jonathan Charles Cole - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):795-796.
    Behrendt & Young's (B&Y's) novel “unifying model” of hallucinations, although comprehensive, fails to incorporate research into the possible role of 5-HT2A receptors in the mode of action of novel “atypical” antipsychotic drugs (which treat hallucinations effectively), and into the role of such receptors, which are located in thalamocortical circuits, in mediating drug-induced hallucinations.
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  2. Defining Existence Presentism.Jonathan Charles Tallant - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S3):479-501.
    In this paper I argue in favour of a new definition of presentism that I call ‘existence presentism’ (EP). Typically, presentism is defined as the thesis that ‘only present objects exist’, or ‘nothing exists that is non-present’.1 I assume these statements to be equivalent. I call these statements of presentism ‘conventional presentism’ (CP). First, in §2, I rehearse arguments due to Ulrich Meyer that purport to show that presentism is not adequately defined as CP. In §§2.1–2.4 I show that considerations (...)
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  3. The Development of Political Theory.Charles Vereker & G. D. H. Cole - 1958 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 13 (3):390-391.
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  4.  27
    Identity, Personhood and the Law: Charles Foster and Jonathan Herring. Springer, 2017: ISBN 978-3-319-53458-9: 70 Pp. [REVIEW]Charles Foster & Jonathan Herring - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):00-00.
    The law tends to think that there is no difficulty about identifying humans. When someone is born, her name is entered into a statutory register. She is ‘X’ in the eyes of the law. At some point, ‘X’ will die and her name will be recorded in another register. If anyone suggested that the second X was not the same as the first, the suggestion would be met with bewilderment. During X's lifetime, the civil law assumed that the X who (...)
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  5.  17
    An Electromyographic Examination of Response Competition.Charles W. Eriksen, Michael G. H. Coles, L. R. Morris & William P. O’Hara - 1985 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (3):165-168.
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  6. Body Image and Body Schema in a Deafferented Subject.Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole - 1995 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 16 (4):369-390.
    In a majority of situations the normal adult maintains posture or moves without consciously monitoring motor activity. Posture and movement are usually close to automatic; they tend to take care of themselves, outside of attentive regard. One's body, in such cases, effaces itself as one is geared into a particular intentional goal. This effacement is possible because of the normal functioning of a body schema. Body schema can be defined as a system of preconscious, subpersonal processes that play a dynamic (...)
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  7.  7
    The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific Community Edited by Harriet Zuckerman, Jonathan R. Cole, and John T. Bruer. [REVIEW]Janet Rowley - 1994 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 37 (4):613-615.
  8.  10
    General Social Stratification in Science. By Jonathan R. Cole and Stephen Cole. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1973. Pp. Xiv+283. £6.25. [REVIEW]J. B. Morrell - 1975 - British Journal for the History of Science 8 (3):250-250.
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  9.  7
    The Outer Circle: Women in the Scientific CommunityHarriet Zuckerman Jonathan R. Cole John T. Bruer.Joann Eisberg - 1994 - Isis 85 (1):195-195.
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  10.  64
    Intention, Attention and the Temporal Experience of Action.Patrick Haggard & Jonathan Cole - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):211-220.
    Subjects estimated the time of intentions to perform an action, of the action itself, or of an auditory effect of the action. A perceptual attraction or binding effect occurred between actions and the effects that followed them. Judgements of intentions did not show this binding, suggesting they are represented independently of actions and their effects. In additional unpredictable judgement conditions, subjects were instructed only after each trial which of these events to judge, thus discouraging focussed attention to a specific event. (...)
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  11.  9
    The Invisible Smile: Living Without Facial Expression.Jonathan Cole & Henrietta Spalding - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    We are defined by our faces. They give identity but, equally importantly, reveal our moods and emotions through facial expression. So what happens when the face cannot move? This book is about people who live with Mbius Syndrome, which has as its main feature an absence of movement of the muscles of facial expression from birth.
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  12.  44
    Living Without Touch and Peripheral Information About Body Position and Movement: Studies with Deafferented Subjects.Jonathan Cole & Jacques Paillard - 1995 - In Jose Luis Bermudez, Anthony J. Marcel & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. MIT Press. pp. 245--266.
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  13.  35
    Please Don’T Tell Me.Jonathan Herring & Charles Foster - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):20.
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  14.  37
    Please Don’T Tell Me.Jonathan Herring & Charles Foster - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):20-29.
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  15. On the Immunity Principle: A View From a Robot.Jonathan Cole & Oliver Sacks - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):167.
    Preprint of Cole, Sacks, and Waterman. 2000. "On the immunity principle: A view from a robot." Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (5): 167, a response to Shaun Gallagher, S. 2000. "Philosophical conceptions of the self: implications for cognitive science," Trends in Cognitive Science 4 (1):14-21. Also see Shaun Gallagher, Reply to Cole, Sacks, and Waterman Trends in Cognitive Science 4, No. 5 (2000): 167-68.
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  16.  99
    Gesture Following Deafferentation: A Phenomenologically Informed Experimental Study.Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & David McNeill - 2002 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):49-67.
    Empirical studies of gesture in a subject who has lost proprioception and the sense of touch from the neck down show that specific aspects of gesture remain normal despite abnormal motor processes for instrumental movement. The experiments suggest that gesture, as a linguistic phenomenon, is not reducible to instrumental movement. They also support and extend claims made by Merleau-Ponty concerning the relationship between language and cognition. Gesture, as language, contributes to the accomplishment of thought.
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  17. Affective Proprioception.Jonathan Cole & Barbara Montero - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2):299-317.
    Proprioception has been considered, within neuroscience, in the context of the control of movement. Here we discuss a possible second role for this ‘sixth sense’, pleasure in and of movement, homologous with the recently described affective touch. We speculate on its evolution and place in human society and suggest that pleasure in movement may depend not on feedback but also on harmony between intention and action. Examples come from expert movers, dancers and sportsmen, and from those without proprioception due to (...)
     
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  18.  85
    Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity.Jonathan Cole - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome. People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed after spinal cord injury struggle to have others (...)
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  19.  42
    On 'Being Faceless': Selfhood and Facial Embodiment.Jonathan Cole - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):5-6.
    For most people a sense of self includes an embodied component: when describing our selves we describe those aspects of our physical bodies which can be easily codified: height, hair colour, sex, eye colour. Even when we consider ourselves we tend not to consider our intellectual cognitive characteristics but our describable anatomy. Wittgenstein's dictum, ‘the human body is the best picture of the human soul’, is relevant here but I would like to go further: the body-part we feel most embodied (...)
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  20.  26
    Helsinki Discords: FDA, Ethics, and International Drug Trials.Jonathan Kimmelman, Charles Weijer & Eric M. Meslin - unknown
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  21.  17
    Women in American Science.Harriet Zuckerman & Jonathan R. Cole - 1975 - Minerva 13 (1):82-102.
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  22.  18
    Identity, Personhood and the Law: A Response to Ashcroft and McGee.Charles Foster & Jonathan Herring - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):73-74.
    We are very grateful to Richard Ashcroft1 and Andrew McGee2 for their thoughtful and articulate criticisms of our views.3 Ashcroft has disappointingly low aspirations for the law. Of course he is right to say that the law is not a ‘self-sufficient, integrated and self-interpreting system of doctrine’. The law is often philosophically incoherent and internally contradictory. But it does not follow from this that all areas of the law are philosophically unsatisfactory. And if that were true, the response should not (...)
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  23.  44
    The Double Effect Effect.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring, Karen Melham & Tony Hope - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):56-72.
    The “doctrine of double effect” has a pleasing ring to it. It is regarded by some as the cornerstone of any sound approach to end-of-life issues and by others as religious mumbo jumbo. Discussions about “the doctrine” often generate more heat than light. They are often conducted at cross-purposes and laced with footnotes from Leviticus.
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  24.  52
    Growth Points From the Very Beginning.David McNeill, Susan Duncan, Jonathan Cole, Shaun Gallagher & Bennett Bertenthal - 2010 - In M. Arbib D. Bickerton (ed.), The Emergence of Protolanguage: Holophrasis Vs Compositionality. John Benjamins. pp. 117-132.
    Did protolanguage users use discrete words that referred to objects, actions, locations, etc., and then, at some point, combine them; or on the contrary did they have words that globally indexed whole semantic complexes, and then come to divide them? Our answer is: early humans were forming language units consisting of global and discrete dimensions of semiosis in dynamic opposition. These units of thinking-for-speaking, or ‘growth points’ (GPs) were, jointly, analog imagery (visuo-spatio-motoric) and categorically-contrastive (-emic) linguistic encodings. This discrete-global duality (...)
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  25.  26
    Dissociation in Self-Narrative.Shaun Gallagher & Jonathan Cole - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):149-155.
    We review different analytic approaches to narratives by those with psychopathological conditions, and we suggest that the interpretation of such narratives are complicated by a variety of phenomenological and hermeneutical considerations. We summarize an empirical study of narrative distance in narratives by non-pathological subjects, and discuss how the results can be interpreted in two different ways with regard to the issue of dissociation.
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  26.  21
    Testing the Limits of the ‘Joint Account’ Model of Genetic Information: A Legal Thought Experiment.Charles Foster, Jonathan Herring & Magnus Boyd - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):379-382.
  27.  21
    Empathy Needs a Face.Jonathan Cole - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):5-7.
    The importance of the face is best understood, it is suggested, from the effects of visible facial difference in people. Their experience reflects the ways in which the face may be necessary for the interpersonal relatedness underlying such 'sharing' mind states as empathy. It is proposed that the face evolved as a result of several evolutionary pressures but that it is well placed to assume the role of an embodied representation of the increasingly refined inner states of mind that developed (...)
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  28.  10
    On'Being Faceless'.Jonathan Cole - 1999 - In Jonathan Shear & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Models of the Self. Imprint Academic. pp. 301.
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  29.  36
    Can Semi-Supervised Learning Explain Incorrect Beliefs About Categories?Charles W. Kalish, Timothy T. Rogers, Jonathan Lang & Xiaojin Zhu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):106-118.
    Three experiments with 88 college-aged participants explored how unlabeled experiences—learning episodes in which people encounter objects without information about their category membership—influence beliefs about category structure. Participants performed a simple one-dimensional categorization task in a brief supervised learning phase, then made a large number of unsupervised categorization decisions about new items. In all three experiments, the unsupervised experience altered participants’ implicit and explicit mental category boundaries, their explicit beliefs about the most representative members of each category, and even their memory (...)
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  30.  19
    Perceptions of the Impact of a Large‐Scale Collaborative Improvement Programme: Experience in the UK Safer Patients Initiative.Jonathan Benn, Susan Burnett, Anam Parand, Anna Pinto, Sandra Iskander & Charles Vincent - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (3):524-540.
  31.  24
    Social Cognition and Primacy of Movement Revisited.Shaun Gallagher, Jonathan Cole & David McNeill - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):155-156.
  32.  1
    Who's Afraid of Academic Freedom?Akeel Bilgrami & Jonathan R. Cole (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    In these seventeen essays, distinguished senior scholars discuss the conceptual issues surrounding the idea of freedom of inquiry and scrutinize a variety of obstacles to such inquiry that they have encountered in their personal and professional experience. Their discussion of threats to freedom traverses a wide disciplinary and institutional, political and economic range covering specific restrictions linked to speech codes, the interests of donors, institutional review board licensing, political pressure groups, and government policy, as well as phenomena of high generality, (...)
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  33.  10
    Phenomenology, Neuroscience and Impairment.Jonathan Cole - 2008 - Abstracta 4 (3):20-33.
  34.  70
    The Brain as Part of an Enactive System.Shaun Gallagher, Daniel D. Hutto, Jan Slaby & Jonathan Cole - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):421-422.
    The notion of an enactive system requires thinking about the brain in a way that is different from the standard computational-representational models. In evolutionary terms, the brain does what it does and is the way that it is, across some scale of variations, because it is part of a living body with hands that can reach and grasp in certain limited ways, eyes structured to focus, an autonomic system, an upright posture, etc. coping with specific kinds of environments, and with (...)
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  35.  95
    Gesture-First, but No Gestures?David McNeill, Bennett Bertenthal, Jonathan Cole & Shaun Gallagher - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):138-139.
    Although Arbib's extension of the mirror-system hypothesis neatly sidesteps one problem with the “gesture-first” theory of language origins, it overlooks the importance of gestures that occur in current-day human linguistic performance, and this lands it with another problem. We argue that, instead of gesture-first, a system of combined vocalization and gestures would have been a more natural evolutionary unit.
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  36. Jonathan Cole, About Face. [REVIEW]A. Noee - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (5):86-86.
     
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  37.  90
    The Phenomenology of Agency and Intention in the Face of Paralysis and Insentience.Jonathan Cole - 2007 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):309-325.
    Studies of perception have focussed on sensation, though more recently the perception of action has, once more, become the subject of investigation. These studies have looked at acute experimental situations. The present paper discusses the subjective experience of those with either clinical syndromes of loss of movement or sensation (spinal cord injury, sensory neuronopathy syndrome or motor stroke), or with experimental paralysis or sensory loss. The differing phenomenology of these is explored and their effects on intention and agency discussed. It (...)
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  38.  38
    Church's Thesis Misconstrued.Jonathan Berg & Charles Chihara - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 28 (5):357 - 362.
  39.  82
    Jonathan Bennett on 'Even If'.Charles B. Cross - 1985 - Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (3):353-357.
    I show that given Jonathan Bennett's theory of 'even if,' the following statement is logically true iff the principle of conditional excluded is valid: (SE) If Q and if P wouldn't rule out Q, then Q even if P. Hence whatever intuitions support the validity of (SE) support the validity of Conditional Excluded Middle, too. Finally I show that Bennett's objection to John Bigelow's theory of the conditional can be turned into a (perhaps) more telling one, viz. that on (...)
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  40.  55
    Introduction to The Philosophy of Information.Ken Herold - 2004 - Library Trends 52 (3):373-376.
    This introduction summarizes the contributions made by authors Ian Cornelius, Bernd Frohmann, Ronald E. Day, Jonathan Furner, John M. Budd, Don Fallis, Birger Hjørland, Torkild Thellefsen, Elin K. Jakob, Jack Mills, Elaine Svenonius, Stephen Paling, Hope A. Olson, Amanda Spink and Charles Cole, and Søren Brier, to an inaugural review of the Philosophy of Information from perspectives in Library and Information Science/Studies. Philosopher Luciano Floridi provides an Afterword with respect to the application of this new school of (...)
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  41.  54
    Comment on Laureys Et Al. Self-Consciousness in Non-Communicative Patients☆.Jonathan Cole - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):742-745.
    Until comparatively recently, say the middle of the last century, spinal cord injury was fatal as pressure sores and other infections took their toll. Those with severe brain injuries, unable to move or even communicate, fared even worse; without movement or feeding such patients were nursed until nature took its course. Over the last few decades medical and nursing advances have enabled some of these vegetative patients to survive for considerable time, provoking, at times, ethical and legal dilemmas. Though they (...)
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  42.  15
    A Mechanism for Error Detection in Speeded Response Time Tasks.Clay B. Holroyd, Nick Yeung, Michael G. H. Coles & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2005 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 134 (2):163-191.
  43.  14
    Does Proprioception Influence Human Spatial Cognition? A Study on Individuals With Massive Deafferentation.Alix G. Renault, Malika Auvray, Gaetan Parseihian, R. Chris Miall, Jonathan Cole & Fabrice R. Sarlegna - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  44.  52
    Imagination After Neurological Losses of Movement and Sensation: The Experience of Spinal Cord Injury. [REVIEW]Jonathan Cole - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):183-195.
    To what extent is imagination dependent on embodied experience? In attempting to answer such questions I consider the experiences of those who have to come to terms with altered neurological function, namely those with spinal cord injury at the neck. These people have each lost all sensation and movement below the neck. How might these new ways of living affect their imagination?
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  45. Jonathan Bennett: "Linguistic Behaviour".Charles Taylor - 1980 - Dialogue 19 (2):290.
     
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  46.  39
    "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary.Jonathan Cole - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  47.  15
    Relations Between the Face and the Self as Revealed by Neurological Loss: The Subjective Experience of Facial Difference.Jonathan Cole - 2000 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 67.
  48.  23
    The Spirit of Laws.Charles de Secondat Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Nugent, J. V. Prichard & G. D. H. Cole - 1750 - Encyclopæia Britannica.
    Of laws in general -- Of laws directly derived from the nature of government -- Of the principles of the three kinds of government -- That the laws of education ought to be relative to the principles of government -- That the laws given by the legislator ought to be relative to the nature of government -- Consquences of the principles of different governments, with respect to the simplicity of civil and criminal laws, the form of judgements, and inflicting of (...)
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  49.  39
    Linguistic Behaviour, By Jonathan Bennett. New York, N.Y.: Cambridge University Press. 1976. Pp. X, 292, $17.50.Charles Taylor - 1980 - Dialogue 19 (2):290-301.
  50.  20
    Littérature et histoire du christianisme ancien.Jeffery Aubin, Dianne M. Cole, Julio Cesar Dias Chaves, Jonathan I. von Kodar, Anne-France Morand, Timothy Pettipiece, Paul-Hubert Poirier, Martin Voyer & Eric Crégheur - 2015 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 71 (3):503-553.
    Jeffery Aubin,Dianne Cole,Julio Cesar Dias Chaves,Jonathan von Kodar,Anne-France Morand,Timothy Pettipiece,Paul-Hubert Poirier,Martin Voyer,Eric Crégheur.
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