Results for 'Shankar Ayillath Nair'

246 found
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  1.  34
    Harm Isn't All You Need: Parental Discretion and Medical Decisions for a Child: Table 1.Dominic Wilkinson & Tara Nair - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):116-118.
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  2.  60
    Grape Expectations: The Role of Cognitive Influences in Color–Flavor Interactions.Maya U. Shankar, Carmel A. Levitan & Charles Spence - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):380-390.
    Color conveys critical information about the flavor of food and drink by providing clues as to edibility, flavor identity, and flavor intensity. Despite the fact that more than 100 published papers have investigated the influence of color on flavor perception in humans, surprisingly little research has considered how cognitive and contextual constraints may mediate color–flavor interactions. In this review, we argue that the discrepancies demonstrated in previously-published color–flavor studies may, at least in part, reflect differences in the sensory expectations that (...)
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  3.  10
    Algorithmic Governance: Developing a Research Agenda Through the Power of Collective Intelligence.Kalpana Shankar, Burkhard Schafer, Niall O'Brolchain, Maria Helen Murphy, John Morison, Su-Ming Khoo, Muki Haklay, Heike Felzmann, Aisling De Paor, Anthony Behan, Rónán Kennedy, Chris Noone, Michael J. Hogan & John Danaher - 2017 - Big Data and Society 4 (2).
    We are living in an algorithmic age where mathematics and computer science are coming together in powerful new ways to influence, shape and guide our behaviour and the governance of our societies. As these algorithmic governance structures proliferate, it is vital that we ensure their effectiveness and legitimacy. That is, we need to ensure that they are an effective means for achieving a legitimate policy goal that are also procedurally fair, open and unbiased. But how can we ensure that algorithmic (...)
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  4.  18
    “It’s Not Easy Living a Sustainable Lifestyle”: How Greater Knowledge Leads to Dilemmas, Tensions and Paralysis.Cristina Longo, Avi Shankar & Peter Nuttall - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 154 (3):759-779.
    Providing people with information is considered an important first step in encouraging them to behave sustainably as it influences their consumption beliefs, attitudes and intentions. However, too much information can also complicate these processes and negatively affect behaviour. This is exacerbated when people have accepted the need to live a more sustainable lifestyle and attempt to enact its principles. Drawing on interview data with people committed to sustainability, we identify the contentious role of knowledge in further disrupting sustainable consumption ideals. (...)
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  5. The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives.Shankar Vedantam - 2010 - Spiegel & Grau.
    The hidden brain has its finger on the scale when we make all of our most complex and important decisions – it decides who we fall in love with, whether we should convict someone of murder, or which way to run when someone yells “fire ...
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  6. Consequences of Reasoning with Conflicting Obligations.Shyam Nair - 2014 - Mind 123 (491):753-790.
    Since at least the 1960s, deontic logicians and ethicists have worried about whether there can be normative systems that allow conflicting obligations. Surprisingly, however, little direct attention has been paid to questions about how we may reason with conflicting obligations. In this paper, I present a problem for making sense of reasoning with conflicting obligations and argue that no deontic logic can solve this problem. I then develop an account of reasoning based on the popular idea in ethics that reasons (...)
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  7.  23
    Do the ‘Brain Dead’ Merely Appear to Be Alive?Michael Nair-Collins & Franklin G. Miller - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):747-753.
    The established view regarding ‘brain death’ in medicine and medical ethics is that patients determined to be dead by neurological criteria are dead in terms of a biological conception of death, not a philosophical conception of personhood, a social construction or a legal fiction. Although such individuals show apparent signs of being alive, in reality they are dead, though this reality is masked by the intervention of medical technology. In this article, we argue that an appeal to the distinction between (...)
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  8.  21
    Abandoning the Dead Donor Rule? A National Survey of Public Views on Death and Organ Donation.Michael Nair-Collins, Sydney R. Green & Angelina R. Sutin - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):297-302.
  9.  54
    How Do Reasons Accrue?Shyam Nair - 2016 - In Errol Lord & Barry Maguire (eds.), Weighing Reasons. Oxford University Press. pp. 56–73.
    Reasons can interact in a variety of ways to determine what we ought to do or believe. And there can be cases where two reasons to do an act or have a belief are individually worse than a reason to not do that act or have that belief, but the reasons together are better than the reason to not do that act or have that belief. So the reasons together―which we can call the accrual of those reasons—can have a strength (...)
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  10.  81
    Brain Death, Paternalism, and the Language of “Death”.Michael Nair-Collins - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (1):53-104.
    The controversy over brain death and the dead donor rule continues unabated, with some of the same key points and positions starting to see repetition in the literature. One might wonder whether some of the participants are talking past each other, not all debating the same issue, even though they are using the same words (e.g., “death”). One reason for this is the complexity of the debate: It’s not merely about the nature of human life and death. Interwoven into this (...)
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  11. Death, Brain Death, and the Limits of Science: Why the Whole-Brain Concept of Death Is a Flawed Public Policy.Mike Nair-Collins - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):667-683.
    Legally defining “death” in terms of brain death unacceptably obscures a value judgment that not all reasonable people would accept. This is disingenuous, and it results in serious moral flaws in the medical practices surrounding organ donation. Public policy that relies on the whole-brain concept of death is therefore morally flawed and in need of revision.
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  12.  82
    A Fault Line in Ethical Theory.Shyam Nair - 2014 - Philosophical Perspectives 28 (1):173-200.
    A traditional picture is that cases of deontic constraints--- cases where an act is wrong (or one that there is most reason to not do) even though performing that act will prevent more acts of the same morally (or practically) relevant type from being performed---form a kind of fault line in ethical theory separating (agent-neutral) consequentialist theories from other ethical theories. But certain results in the recent literature, such as those due to Graham Oddie and Peter Milne in "Act and (...)
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  13. Conflicting Reasons, Unconflicting ‘Ought's.Shyam Nair - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (3):629-663.
    One of the popular albeit controversial ideas in the last century of moral philosophy is that what we ought to do is explained by our reasons. And one of the central features of reasons that accounts for their popularity among normative theorists is that they can conflict. But I argue that the fact that reasons conflict actually also poses two closely related problems for this popular idea in moral philosophy. The first problem is a generalization of a problem in deontic (...)
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  14.  7
    Structural Analysis of the Wichita Uplift and Structures in the Anadarko Basin, Southern Oklahoma.Molly Turko & Shankar Mitra - 2021 - Interpretation 9 (1):T107-T122.
    We have constructed regional structural transects across the Wichita Uplift and the adjacent Anadarko Basin to show the relationship between thick-skinned basement-involved structures and thin-skinned detached fold-thrust structures. Slip from the basement-involved structures in the Wichita Uplift is transferred along two major detachments into the Anadarko Basin. Our interpretation is that along the northwestern margin, the Wichita Uplift is marked by a zone of frontal imbricates forming a triangular wedge with most of the slip dissipated along the Wichita front. Paleozoic (...)
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  15.  11
    Advances on the Resilience of Complex Networks.Ilaria Giannoccaro, Vito Albino & Anand Nair - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-3.
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  16.  47
    Can the Brain-Dead Be Harmed or Wronged?: On the Moral Status of Brain Death and its Implications for Organ Transplantation.Michael Nair-Collins - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (4):525-559.
    The dead donor rule, which requires that organ donors not be killed by the process of organ procurement, is thought to protect vulnerable patients from exploitation and from being harmed through organ procurement. In current practice, the majority of transplantable organs are retrieved from patients who are declared dead by neurological criteria, or "brain-dead." Because brain death is considered to be sufficient for death, it is thought that brain-dead donors are neither harmed nor wronged by organ removal.In this essay I (...)
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  17. Philosophy's New Challenge: Experiments and Intentional Action.N. Ángel Pinillos, Nick Smith, G. Shyam Nair, Peter Marchetto & Cecilea Mun - 2011 - Mind and Language 26 (1):115-139.
    Experimental philosophers have gathered impressive evidence for the surprising conclusion that philosophers' intuitions are out of step with those of the folk. As a result, many argue that philosophers' intuitions are unreliable. Focusing on the Knobe Effect, a leading finding of experimental philosophy, we defend traditional philosophy against this conclusion. Our key premise relies on experiments we conducted which indicate that judgments of the folk elicited under higher quality cognitive or epistemic conditions are more likely to resemble those of the (...)
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  18.  72
    Constructing Semantic Representations From a Gradually Changing Representation of Temporal Context.Marc W. Howard, Karthik H. Shankar & Udaya K. K. Jagadisan - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):48-73.
    Computational models of semantic memory exploit information about co-occurrences of words in naturally occurring text to extract information about the meaning of the words that are present in the language. Such models implicitly specify a representation of temporal context. Depending on the model, words are said to have occurred in the same context if they are presented within a moving window, within the same sentence, or within the same document. The temporal context model (TCM), which specifies a particular definition of (...)
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  19.  14
    Taking Science Seriously in the Debate on Death and Organ Transplantation.Michael Nair-Collins - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (6):38-48.
    The concept of death and its relationship to organ transplantation continue to be sources of debate and confusion among academics, clinicians, and the public. Recently, an international group of scholars and clinicians, in collaboration with the World Health Organization, met in the first phase of an effort to develop international guidelines for determination of death. The goal of this first phase was to focus on the biology of death and the dying process while bracketing legal, ethical, cultural, and religious perspectives. (...)
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  20.  11
    Commentary: False Positives in the Diagnosis of Brain Death.Michael Nair-Collins & Franklin G. Miller - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (4):648-656.
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  21.  15
    Pragmatism and Care in Engineering Ethics.Indira Nair & William M. Bulleit - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (1):65-87.
    Engineering is a practice that must function in an environment of incomplete and uncertain knowledge. This environment has become even more difficult in an increasingly complex world. Engineering ethics has to be framed and taught in a way that addresses these realities. This paper proposes a combination of the philosophy of pragmatism and the ethic of care as a possible framework for the practice of engineering ethics that can provide flexibility and openness to address engineering ethics problems more realistically within (...)
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  22.  25
    Differing Patterns of Altered Slow-5 Oscillations in Healthy Aging and Ischemic Stroke.Christian La, Pouria Mossahebi, Veena A. Nair, Brittany M. Young, Julie Stamm, Rasmus Birn, Mary E. Meyerand & Vivek Prabhakaran - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  23.  24
    Settling for Second Best: When Should Doctors Agree to Parental Demands for Suboptimal Medical Treatment?Tara Nair, Julian Savulescu, Jim Everett, Ryan Tonkens & Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (12):831-840.
    Background Doctors sometimes encounter parents who object to prescribed treatment for their children, and request suboptimal substitutes be administered instead. Previous studies have focused on parental refusal of treatment and when this should be permitted, but the ethics of requests for suboptimal treatment has not been explored. Methods The paper consists of two parts: an empirical analysis and an ethical analysis. We performed an online survey with a sample of the general public to assess respondents’ thresholds for acceptable harm and (...)
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  24.  95
    Must Good Reasoning Satisfy Cumulative Transitivity?Shyam Nair - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (1):123-146.
    There is consensus among computer scientists, logicians, and philosophers that good reasoning with qualitative beliefs must have the structural property of cumulative transitivity or, for short, cut. This consensus is typically explicitly argued for partially on the basis of practical and mathematical considerations. But the consensus is also implicit in the approach philosophers take to almost every puzzle about reasoning that involves multiple steps: philosophers typically assume that if each step in reasoning is acceptable considered on its own, the whole (...)
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  25.  37
    Laying Futility to Rest.Michael Nair-Collins - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):554-583.
    In this essay I examine the formal structure of the concept of futility, enabling identification of the appropriate roles played by patient, professional, and society. I argue that the concept of futility does not justify unilateral decisions to forego life-sustaining medical treatment over patient or legitimate surrogate objection, even when futility is determined by a process or subject to ethics committee review. Furthermore, I argue for a limited positive ethical obligation on the part of health care professionals to assist patients (...)
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  26.  11
    A Distributed Representation of Internal Time.Marc W. Howard, Karthik H. Shankar, William R. Aue & Amy H. Criss - 2015 - Psychological Review 122 (1):24-53.
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  27.  6
    Bystander Ethics and Good Samaritanism: A Paradox for Learning Health Organizations.James E. Sabin, Noelle M. Cocoros, Crystal J. Garcia, Jennifer C. Goldsack, Kevin Haynes, Nancy D. Lin, Debbe McCall, Vinit Nair, Sean D. Pokorney, Cheryl N. McMahill‐Walraven, Christopher B. Granger & Richard Platt - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (4):18-26.
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  28.  11
    Emphasis Given Evolution and Creationism by Texas High School Biology Teachers.Ganga Shankar & Gerald D. Skoog - 1993 - Science Education 77 (2):221-233.
  29.  17
    How Can SMEs in a Cluster Respond to Global Demands for Corporate Responsibility?Heidi von Weltzien Heivik & Deepthi Shankar - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):175 - 195.
    This article argues why and how a participatory approach to implement corporate social responsibility (CSR) in a cluster would be beneficial for small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who are members of the NCE -Subsea cluster in Bergen, Norway. The political and strategic reasons as well as internal motivation for SMEs to incorporate CSR into their business strategies are discussed with support from relevant literature. Furthermore, we offer a discussion on the characteristics of different approaches to incorporating CSR as part of business (...)
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  30.  12
    Clinical and Ethical Perspectives on Brain Death.Michael Nair-Collins - 2015 - Medicolegal and Bioethics 5:69-80.
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  31.  24
    O Arcebispo de Braga D. Diogo de Sousa “Principe Umanizzato” Do Renascimento Eo Seu Projecto Educativo Moderno1.Nair de Nazaré Castro Soares - 2011 - Humanitas 63:527-561.
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  32.  73
    In Defense of Brain Death: Replies to Don Marquis, Michael Nair-Collins, Doyen Nguyen, and Laura Specker Sullivan.John P. Lizza - 2018 - Diametros 55:68-90.
    In this paper, I defend brain death as a criterion for determining death against objections raised by Don Marquis, Michael Nair-Collins, Doyen Nguyen, and Laura Specker Sullivan. I argue that any definition of death for beings like us relies on some sortal concept by which we are individuated and identified and that the choice of that concept in a practical context is not determined by strictly biological considerations but involves metaphysical, moral, social, and cultural considerations. This view supports acceptance (...)
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  33. The Logic of Reasons.Shyam Nair & John Horty - 2018 - In Daniel Star (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Reasons and Normativity. Oxford University Press. pp. 67-84.
    In this chapter, we begin by sketching in the broadest possible strokes the ideas behind two formal systems that have been introduced with to goal of explicating the ways in which reasons interact to support the actions and conclusions they do. The first of these is the theory of defeasible reasoning developed in the seminal work of Pollock; the second is a more recent theory due to Horty, which adapts and develops the default logic introduced by Reiter to provide an (...)
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  34.  60
    Workplace Spirituality Facilitation: A Comprehensive Model.Badrinarayan Shankar Pawar - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):375-386.
    This article specifies a comprehensive model for workplace spirituality facilitation that integrates various views from the existing research on workplace spirituality facilitation. It outlines the significance of workplace spirituality topic and highlights its relevance to the area of ethics. It then briefly outlines the various directions the existing workplace spirituality research has taken. Based on this, it indicates that an integration of the elements from various existing research works on workplace spirituality facilitation into a comprehensive workplace spirituality facilitation model could (...)
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  35.  40
    A Biological Theory of Death: Characterization, Justification, and Implications.Michael Nair-Collins - 2018 - Diametros 55:27-43.
    John P. Lizza has long been a major figure in the scholarly literature on criteria for death. His searching and penetrating critiques of the dominant biological paradigm, and his defense of a theory of death of the person as a psychophysical entity, have both significantly advanced the literature. In this special issue, Lizza reinforces his critiques of a strictly biological approach. In my commentary, I take up Lizza’s challenge regarding a biological concept of death. He is certainly right to point (...)
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  36.  11
    Linearizing Intuitionistic Implication.Patrick Lincoln, Andre Scedrov & Natarajan Shankar - 1993 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 60 (2):151-177.
    An embedding of the implicational propositional intuitionistic logic into the nonmodal fragment of intuitionistic linear logic is given. The embedding preserves cut-free proofs in a proof system that is a variant of IIL. The embedding is efficient and provides an alternative proof of the PSPACE-hardness of IMALL. It exploits several proof-theoretic properties of intuitionistic implication that analyze the use of resources in IIL proofs.
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  37.  9
    How and Why Multiple MCMs Are Loaded at Origins of DNA Replication.Shankar P. Das & Nicholas Rhind - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (7):613-617.
  38. “Adding Up” Reasons: Lessons for Reductive and Nonreductive Approaches.Shyam Nair - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):38-88.
    How do multiple reasons combine to support a conclusion about what to do or believe? This question raises two challenges: How can we represent the strength of a reason? How do the strengths of multiple reasons combine? Analogous challenges about confirmation have been answered using probabilistic tools. Can reductive and nonreductive theories of reasons use these tools to answer their challenges? Yes, or more exactly: reductive theories can answer both challenges. Nonreductive theories, with the help of a result in confirmation (...)
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  39.  6
    John Brunero, Instrumental Rationality: The Normativity of Means-Ends Coherence.Shyam Nair - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):243-248.
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  40.  20
    Medical Futility and Involuntary Passive Euthanasia.Michael Nair-Collins - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (3):415-422.
    Conflicts surrounding the provision of life-sustaining treatment create difficult ethical and interpersonal challenges for providers, patients, and families or other surrogates alike. These conflicts implicate a constellation of ethical concepts, including distributive justice, harms and wrongs to patients, fiduciary obligations to patients, standards for surrogate decision-making, and medical futility. Recently, several critical care societies published a policy statement on conflicts at the end of life, and advocated for a new concept, “potentially inappropriate treatment”. They argued that in some circumstances, after (...)
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  41.  27
    Moral Evaluations of Organ Transplantation Influence Judgments of Death and Causation.Michael Nair-Collins & Mary A. Gerend - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):283-297.
    Two experiments investigated whether moral evaluations of organ transplantation influence judgments of death and causation. Participants’ beliefs about whether an unconscious organ donor was dead and whether organ removal caused death in a hypothetical vignette varied depending on the moral valence of the vignette. Those who were randomly assigned to the good condition were more likely to believe that the donor was dead prior to organ removal and that organ removal did not cause death. Furthermore, attitudes toward euthanasia and organ (...)
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  42.  11
    Role of the Contralesional Vs. Ipsilesional Hemisphere in Stroke Recovery.Keith C. Dodd, Veena A. Nair & Vivek Prabhakaran - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  43.  7
    Is Heart Transplantation After Circulatory Death Compatible with the Dead Donor Rule?Michael Nair-Collins & Franklin G. Miller - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (5):319-320.
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  44.  15
    Using Paintings to Explore the Medical Humanities in a Nepalese Medical School.P. R. Shankar & R. M. Piryani - 2009 - Medical Humanities 35 (2):121-122.
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  45.  3
    Metamathematics, Machines and Gödel's Proof.N. Shankar - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    The automatic verification of large parts of mathematics has been an aim of many mathematicians from Leibniz to Hilbert. While Gödel's first incompleteness theorem showed that no computer program could automatically prove certain true theorems in mathematics, the advent of electronic computers and sophisticated software means in practice there are many quite effective systems for automated reasoning that can be used for checking mathematical proofs. This book describes the use of a computer program to check the proofs of several celebrated (...)
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  46.  29
    Ethics and Pervasive Technologies: A Collaborative Approach to Teaching.Kalpana Shankar & Kay H. Connelly - 2010 - Teaching Ethics 11 (1):75-85.
  47.  6
    Responsibility for Poor Health Status of Lower Income People Must Account for Morally Blameworthy Decisions Made by Employers Who Exploit Them.Michael Nair-Collins - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):17-19.
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  48.  21
    Just a Minute Meditation: Rapid Voluntary Conscious State Shifts in Long Term Meditators.Ajay Kumar Nair, Arun Sasidharan, John P. John, Seema Mehrotra & Bindu M. Kutty - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 53:176-184.
  49.  74
    Some of the Recent Organizational Behavior Concepts as Precursors to Workplace Spirituality.Badrinarayan Shankar Pawar - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):245-261.
    This paper addresses researchers’ call for integrating workplace spirituality with organizational literature. This paper points out that self-interest transcendence is a common aspect in the workplace spirituality concept that emerged in the last decade and also in four OB concepts – transformational leadership, organizational citizenship behavior, organizational support, and procedural justice – that emerged in OB about two decades ago. Based on this common aspect of self-interest transcendence and the temporal precedence of these four OB concepts’ emergence, it indicates that (...)
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  50.  22
    Leadership Spiritual Behaviors Toward Subordinates: An Empirical Examination of the Effects of a Leader’s Individual Spirituality and Organizational Spirituality.Badrinarayan Shankar Pawar - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (3):439-452.
    This study notes three research requirements in workplace spirituality namely; need for conducting empirical studies, building on the existing research, and linking spirituality to organizational topics in general and leadership in particular. It also notes that the existing literature indicates a requirement for examining the spiritual sources of a leader’s spiritual behaviors toward subordinates. To address these research requirements in workplace spirituality, this study conducts an empirical examination of the effect of two spiritual factors—leader’s individual spirituality and organizational spirituality—on leadership (...)
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