Search results for 'Steve Langton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jennifer Hornsby, Louise Antony, Jennifer Saul, Natalie Stoljar, Nellie Wieland & Rae Langton (2012). Review Symposium: Rae Langton, Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. Jurisprudence 2 (2):379-440.score: 120.0
  2. Vicki Bruce, Steve Langton & Harold Hill (1999). Complexities of Face Perception and Categorisation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):369-370.score: 120.0
    We amplify possible complications to the tidy division between early vision and later categorisation which arise when we consider the perception of human faces. Although a primitive face-detecting system, used for social attention, may indeed be integral to “early vision,” the relationship between this and diverse other uses made of information from faces is far from clear.
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  3. Rae Langton (1998). Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Rae Langton offers a new interpretation and defense of Kant's doctrine of things in themselves. Kant distinguishes things in themselves from phenomena, and in so doing he makes a metaphysical distinction between intrinsic and relational properties of substances. Langton argues that his claim that we have no knowledge of things in themselves is not idealism, but epistemic humility: we have no knowledge of the intrinsic properties of substances. This interpretation vindicates Kant's scientific realism, and shows his primary/secondary quality (...)
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  4. Rae Langton (2009). Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Rae Langton here draws together her ground-breaking work on pornography and objectification. On pornography she argues from uncontroversial liberal premises to the controversial feminist conclusions that pornography subordinates and silences women, and that women have rights against pornography. On objectification she begins with the traditional idea that objectification involves treating a person as a thing, but then shows that it is through a kind of self-fulfilling projection of beliefs and perceptions of women as subordinate that women are made subordinate (...)
     
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  5. Geoffrey Turner (2013). The Apostle Paul in the Jewish Imagination: A Study in Modern Jewish-Christian Relations. By Daniel R. Langton. Pp.Viii, 311, Cambridge University Press, 2010, £50.00. Paul and Scripture. By Steve Moyise. Pp. Viii, 151, SPCK, London, 2010, £12.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (1):153-154.score: 36.0
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  6. Rae Langton (1993). Speech Acts and Unspeakable Acts. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (4):293-330.score: 30.0
  7. Rae Langton & David Lewis (1998). Defining 'Intrinsic'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):333-345.score: 30.0
    Something could be round even if it were the only thing in the universe, unaccompanied by anything distinct from itself. Jaegwon Kim once suggested that we define an intrinsic property as one that can belong to something unaccompanied. Wrong: unaccompaniment itself is not intrinsic, yet it can belong to something unaccompanied. But there is a better Kim-style definition. Say that P is independent of accompaniment iff four different cases are possible: something accompanied may have P or lack P, something unaccompanied (...)
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  8. Rae Langton (2004). Elusive Knowledge of Things in Themselves. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):129 – 136.score: 30.0
    Kant argued that we have no knowledge of things in themselves, no knowledge of the intrinsic properties of things, a thesis that is not idealism but epistemic humility. David Lewis agrees (in 'Ramseyan Humility'), but for Ramseyan reasons rather than Kantian. I compare the doctrines of Ramseyan and Kantian humility, and argue that Lewis's contextualist strategy for rescuing knowledge from the sceptic (proposed elsewhere) should also rescue knowledge of things in themselves. The rescue would not be complete: for knowledge of (...)
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  9. Rae Langton (1990). Whose Right? Ronald Dworkin, Women, and Pornographers. Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (4):311-359.score: 30.0
  10. Rae Langton (2007). Objective and Unconditioned Value. Philosophical Review 116 (2):157-185.score: 30.0
    A claim to objectivity about value is sometimes cast as a claim about the value something has in itself, independent of its relations to other things. Goodness is supposed to be “separate from” relations to such irrelevancies as “private and personal advantage”, or “the positive will or command of God”, as Samuel Clarke put it.1 This thought about independence or separateness is also expressed in the idea of intrinsic value, so that it can be tempting to align a commitment to (...)
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  11. Rae Langton & Caroline West (1999). Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):303 – 319.score: 30.0
  12. Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & Rae Langton (2004). Elusive Knowledge of Things in Themselves. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):129 – 136.score: 30.0
    Kant argued that we have no knowledge of things in themselves, no knowledge of the intrinsic properties of things, a thesis that is not idealism but epistemic humility. David Lewis agrees (in 'Ramseyan Humility'), but for Ramseyan reasons rather than Kantian. I compare the doctrines of Ramseyan and Kantian humility, and argue that Lewis's contextualist strategy for rescuing knowledge from the sceptic (proposed elsewhere) should also rescue knowledge of things in themselves. The rescue would not be complete: for knowledge of (...)
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  13. Rae Langton (2007). Disenfranchised Silence. In Michael Smith, Robert Goodin & Geoffrey Geoffrey (eds.), Common Minds. Oxford. 199.score: 30.0
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  14. Rae Langton, Essay 3 Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game.score: 30.0
    If, as many suppose, pornography changes people, a question arises as to how.1 One answer to this question offers a grand and noble vision. Inspired by the idea that pornography is speech, and inspired by a certain liberal ideal about the point of speech in political life, some theorists say that pornography contributes to that liberal ideal: pornography, even at its most violent and misogynistic, and even at its most harmful, is political speech that aims to express certain views about (...)
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  15. Rae Langton (1992). Duty and Desolation. Philosophy 67 (262):481 - 505.score: 30.0
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  16. Richard Holton & Rae Langton (1998). Empathy and Animal Ethics. In Dale Jamieson (ed.), Singer and His Critics. Oxford.score: 30.0
    In responding to the challenge that we cannot know that animals feel pain, Peter Singer says: We can never directly experience the pain of another being, whether that being is human or not. When I see my daughter fall and scrape her knee, I know that she feels pain because of the way she behaves—she cries, she tells me her knee hurts, she rubs the sore spot, and so on. I know that I myself behave in a somewhat similar—if more (...)
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  17. Rae Langton (2006). Kant's Phenomena: Extrinsic or Relational Properties? A Reply to Allais. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):170–185.score: 30.0
    Kant’s claim that we are ignorant of things in themselves is a claim that we cannot know ‘the intrinsic nature of things’, or so at least I argued in Kantian Humility.2 I’m delighted to find that Lucy Allais is in broad agreement with this core idea, thinking it represents, at the very least, a part of Kant’s view. She sees some of the advantages of this interpretation. It has significant textual support. It does justice to Kant’s sense that we are (...)
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  18. Luvell Anderson, Sally Haslanger & Rae Langton (2012). Language and Race. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 30.0
  19. Rae Langton (2010). Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. By MIRANDA FRICKER. Hypatia 25 (2):459-464.score: 30.0
  20. Rae Langton, Whose Right?score: 30.0
    This article has benefited from the thoughtful comments and suggestions of many, including Susan Brison, Gilbert Harman, Sally Haslanger, Richard Holton, Win Kymlicka, Mark van Roojen, Michael Smith, Scott Schon, Katalie Stoljar, and the Editors of Philoso- phy & Public Affairs, I am grateful to them all. r, American Booksellers, Inc, v, Hudnut, 5g8 F. Supp. I327 (S.D. Ind. zgsA) (heresfter Hudnut).
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  21. Rae Langton (2009). Esteem in the Moral Economy of Oppression. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):273-291.score: 30.0
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  22. Rae Langton & David Lewis (2001). Marshall and Parsons on 'Intrinsic'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):353-355.score: 30.0
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  23. Rae Langton (2004). Intention as Faith. In H. Steward & J. Hyman (eds.), Agency and Action. Cambridge University Press Press. 243-258.score: 30.0
    What, if anything, has faith to do with intention?1 By ‘faith’ I have in mind the attitude described by William James: Suppose...that I am climbing in the Alps, and have had the ill-luck to work myself into a position from which the only escape is by a terrible leap. Being without similar experience, I have no evidence of my ability to perform it successfully; but hope and confidence in myself make me sure I shall not miss my aim, and nerve (...)
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  24. Rae Langton (2003). Problems From Kant by James Van Cleve. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):211–218.score: 30.0
    According to Van Cleve, Kant distinguishes phenomena from things in themselves, thereby distinguishing the virtual from the real; and Kant makes primary qualities merely spatial. However, phenomena are not the virtual, but the relational; things in themselves are not the real, but the intrinsic. Moreover, to make primary qualities merely spatial is to leave out force, and thereby leave out the feature that makes phenomena relational and real-not just virtual.
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  25. Rae Langton (2006). Kant's Phenomena. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):170-185.score: 30.0
  26. Rae Langton (2000). Pornography and Free Speech. The Philosophers' Magazine 11 (11):41-42.score: 30.0
  27. D. P. Sheehan, J. Glick, T. Duncan, J. A. Langton, M. J. Gagliardi & R. Tobe (2002). Phase Space Portraits of an Unresolved Gravitational Maxwell Demon. Foundations of Physics 32 (3):441-462.score: 30.0
    In 1885, during initial discussions of J. C. Maxwell's celebrated thermodynamic demon, Whiting (1) observed that the demon-like velocity selection of molecules can occur in a gravitationally bound gas. Recently, a gravitational Maxwell demon has been proposed which makes use of this observation [D. P. Sheehan, J. Glick, and J. D. Means, Found. Phys. 30, 1227 (2000)]. Here we report on numerical simulations that detail its microscopic phase space structure. Results verify the previously hypothesized mechanism of its paradoxical behavior. This (...)
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  28. Rae Langton (1995). Sexual Solipsism. Philosophical Topics 23 (2):149-187.score: 30.0
  29. Rae Langton (1993). Beyond a Pragmatic Critique of Reason. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):364 – 384.score: 30.0
  30. Rae Langton & Jennifer Hornsby (1998). Free Spech and Illocution. Legal Theory 4 (1):21-37.score: 30.0
    We defend the view of some feminist writers that the notion of silencing has to be taken seriously in discussions of free speech. We assume that what ought to be meant by ‘speech’, in the context ‘free speech’, is whatever it is that a correct justification of the right to free speech justifies one in protecting. And we argue that what one ought to mean includes illocution, in the sense of J.L. Austin.
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  31. Rae Langton (2012). Response. Jurisprudence 2 (2):425-440.score: 30.0
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  32. Rae Langton (2000). Locke's Relations and God's Good Pleasure. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):75–91.score: 30.0
    Did God give things 'accidental powers not rooted in their natures', powers not rooted in intrinsic properties? For Leibniz, no. For Locke, the answer is disputed. On a voluntarist reading, yes, secondary and tertiary qualities are superadded (Margaret Wilson). On a mechanist reading, no, as for Leibniz (Michael Ayers). Since Locke viewed these qualities as relational, his view of relations ought to bear on the dispute. Locke said relation is 'not contained in the real existence of things'. Bennett says Locke (...)
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  33. Rae Langton (2001). Virtues of Resentment. Utilitas 13 (02):255-.score: 30.0
    On a consequentialist account of virtue, a trait is virtuous if it has good consequences, vicious if it has bad. Clumsiness and dimness are therefore vices. Should I resent the clumsy and the dim? , says the consequentialist, counterintuitively - at any rate, Yes’ on an accuracy measure of resentment's virtue: resentment should be an accurate response to consequentialist vice, and these are vices. On a usefulness measure of resentment's virtue, the answer may be different: whether resentment is virtuous depends (...)
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  34. David Lewis & Rae Langton (2002). Comment définir « intrinsèque ». Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 4 (4):511-527.score: 30.0
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  35. R. Langton (2001). Reply to Lorne Falkenstein. Kantian Review 5 (1):64-72.score: 30.0
  36. Stuart Langton (1971). Review Article. Educational Theory 21 (2):219-224.score: 30.0
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  37. Rae Langton (2005). Feminism in Philosophy. In Frank Jackson & Michael Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 231.score: 30.0
  38. Alan Kingstone, Shai Danziger, Stephen R. H. Langton & Salvador Soto-Faraco (2002). A Review of Attentional Capture: On its Automaticity and Sensitivity to Endogenous Control. [REVIEW] PsicolóGica International Journal of Methodology and Experimental Psychology 23 (2):343-346.score: 30.0
  39. Rae Langton (1997). 33. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), Pornography, Speech Acts, and Silence. Blackwell. 337-49.score: 30.0
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  40. C. G. Langton (ed.) (1994). Artificial Life III: Proceedings of the Workshop on Artificial Life. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.score: 30.0
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  41. Fuller Steve (2006). American Ambivalence Toward Academic Freedom. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6).score: 30.0
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  42. Mario Markus, Malte Schmick & Eric Goles (2006). Tracks Emerging by Forcing Langton's Ant with Binary Sequences. Complexity 11 (3):27-32.score: 15.0
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  43. J. Shearmur (2010). Steve Fuller and Intelligent Design. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (3):433-445.score: 12.0
    This essay offers a critical introduction to the intellectual issues involved in the Kitzmiller case relating to intelligent design, and to Steve Fuller’s involvement in it. It offers a brief appraisal of the intelligent design movement stemming from the work of Phillip E. Johnson, and of Steve Fuller’s case for intelligent design in a rather different sense.
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  44. Lucy Allais (2006). Intrinsic Natures: A Critique of Langton on Kant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (1):143–169.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that there is an important respect in which Rae Langton's recent interpretation of Kant is correct: Kant's claim that we cannot know things in themselves should be understood as the claim that we cannot know the intrinsic nature of things. However, I dispute Langton's account of intrinsic properties, and therefore her version of what this claim amounts to. Langton's distinction between intrinsic, causally inert properties and causal powers is problematic, both as an interpretation of (...)
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  45. Gerard Delanty (2003). Rethinking Kuhn's Legacy Without Paradigms: Some Remarks on Steve Fuller's Thomas Kuhn: A Philosophical History for Our Times. Social Epistemology 17 (2 & 3):153 – 156.score: 12.0
    (2003). Rethinking Kuhn's legacy without paradigms: some remarks on Steve Fuller's Thomas Kuhn: A Philosophical History for Our Times. Social Epistemology: Vol. 17, No. 2-3, pp. 153-156. doi: 10.1080/0269172032000144108.
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  46. Francis Remedios (2003). Legitimizing Scientific Knowledge: An Introduction to Steve Fuller's Social Epistemology. Lexington Books.score: 12.0
    The first book to provide an in-depth examination of Steve Fuller's politically oriented social epistemology, Legitimizing Scientific Knowledge compares Fuller ...
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  47. Steve Fuller (2009). In Search of Sociological Foundations for the Project of Humanity Steve Fuller, The New Sociological Imagination. London: Sage Publications, 2006. History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):138-145.score: 12.0
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  48. Mike Thicke (2011). REVIEW: Steve Fuller. Science. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):91-94.score: 12.0
    Historian and philosopher of science Steve Fuller has long embraced his role as a public intellectual. As part of that mission, he testified in the 2005 Dover school board trials, arguing that intelligent design could legitimately claim scientific status. He has since written two books on the intelligent design controversy. Science, his latest effort, is part of The Art of Living series. It is ostensibly an exploration of what it means to “live scientifically,” but is more accurately described as (...)
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  49. Steve Fuller (2009). Book Reviews: Dissent Over Dissent: Reply to Richards Steve Fuller, Dissent Over Descent: Intelligent Design's Challenge to Darwinism. Thriplow, Cambs: Icon Books, 2008. V + 272 Pp. ISBN: 978-1840468-04-5. £12.99. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):117-122.score: 12.0
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  50. Stephen Jay Gould, "The Pattern of Life's History" Stuart Kauffman: Steve is Extremely Bright, Inventive. He Thoroughly Understands Paleontology; He Thoroughly Understands Evolutionary Biology. He Has.. [REVIEW]score: 12.0
    Stuart Kauffman: Steve is extremely bright, inventive. He thoroughly understands paleontology; he thoroughly understands evolutionary biology. He has performed an enormous service in getting people to think about punctuated equilibrium, because you see the process of stasis/sudden change, which is a puzzle. It's the cessation of change for long periods of time. Since you always have mutations, why don't things continue changing? You either have to say that the particular form is highly adapted, optimal, and exists in a stable (...)
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