Results for 'Imply Moral Nihilism'

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  1. Quentin Smith.Moral Realism, Infinite Spacetime & Imply Moral Nihilism - 2003 - In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
     
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  2. Moral Realism and Infinite Spacetime Imply Moral Nihilism.Quentin Smith - 2003 - In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 43--54.
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  3.  18
    Génesis del nóema: un análisis noemático a partir de la constitución del cuerpo adolorido.Alejandro Escudero Morales - 2020 - Revista de Humanidades de Valparaíso 15:65-80.
    The objective of this work is to carry out a genetic study on the Husserlian concept of noema based in the givenness of the real body in the passive experience of pain. The development focuses, either, on the delimitation of the painful body given in its physical sphere in attention to its material properties, and in the eventual integration of this passively given body in the so-called noetic-noematic structure regarding the intentional revelation that pain implies. To do this, pain will (...)
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  4.  82
    Genesis of the noema: A noematic analysis based on the constitution of the body in pain.Alejandro Escudero Morales - 2020 - Humanities Journal of Valparaiso 15:65-80.
    The objective of this work is to carry out a genetic study on the Husserlian concept of noema based in the givenness of the real body in the passive experience of pain. The development focuses, either, on the delimitation of the painful body given in its physical sphere in attention to its material properties, and in the eventual integration of this passively given body in the so-called noetic-noematic structure regarding the intentional revelation that pain implies. To do this, pain will (...)
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  5.  53
    Heritage, Culture and Democracy in Mexico.Gloria López Morales - 2008 - Diogenes 55 (4):105-107.
    This short paper deals with the difficult articulation of a diverse cultural heritage within a society and the democratic forms of assuring its social cohesion. Special attention is paid to the links between immaterial culture and the environment that transforms it into a structural element of social cohesion. Culture is seen as a 'mould' which shapes a shared behaviour, and democracy can be conceived as a system made up of elements of a cultural nature that go as far as implying (...)
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  6.  23
    Heritage, Culture and Democracy in Mexico.Gloria López Morales - 2008 - Diogenes 55 (4):105-107.
    This short paper deals with the difficult articulation of a diverse cultural heritage within a society and the democratic forms of assuring its social cohesion. Special attention is paid to the links between immaterial culture and the environment that transforms it into a structural element of social cohesion. Culture is seen as a 'mould' which shapes a shared behaviour, and democracy can be conceived as a system made up of elements of a cultural nature that go as far as implying (...)
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  7.  12
    ¿Hegel filósofo de la diferencia? Reflexiones sobre la concepción hegeliana de la identidad 1.Camilo Andrés Morales - 2017 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 58 (138):491-508.
    RESUMEN La filosofía hegeliana en general, y en particular la “Ciencia de la lógica” y el tratamiento que en esta se hace sobre nociones como las de identidad y diferencia, generaron desde el momento mismo en que vio la luz, un sinnúmero de posiciones críticas tales como las de Schelling, los hegelianos de izquierda y, en general, de todos aquellos filósofos que, en virtud de las posibles implicaciones prácticas de una filosofía de la identidad buscaron “expurgar la semilla del dragón (...)
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  8.  12
    Universal Design for the Workplace: Ethical Considerations Regarding the Inclusion of Workers with Disabilities.Claire Doussard, Emmanuelle Garbe, Jeremy Morales & Julien Billion - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.
    This paper examines the ethical issues of the inclusion of workers with disabilities in the workplace with a cross-fertilization approach between organization studies, the ethics of care, and a movement from the field of architecture and design that is called Universal Design (UD). It explores how organizations can use UD to develop more inclusive workplaces, first by applying UD principles to workspaces and second by showing how UD implies an integrative understanding of inclusion from the workspace to the workplace. Moreover, (...)
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  9.  9
    The social liberalism of Jenaro Abasolo. Political path towards the empowerment of the disinherited in the industrial regime of the 19th century.Pablo Martínez Becerra & Francisco Cordero Morales - 2022 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 53:61-86.
    Resumen Este artículo da cuenta de la forma en que el liberalismo del filósofo chileno Jenaro Abasolo (1833-1884), al conceder un rol activo al Estado en la “habilitación de la masa desheredada”, responde al adjetivo “social”. En Abasolo, el deber de asegurar en lo posible la prosperidad de las personas, se sostiene en el derecho natural y en una teología de la historia pan[en]teísta afín al krausismo. Abasolo piensa que la redención del desheredado en naciones aun juveniles debe apoyarse en (...)
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  10.  34
    Social perceptions and bioethical implications of birth plans: A qualitative study.Maria José Sánchez-García, Francisco Martínez-Rojo, Jesús A. Galdo-Castiñeiras, Paloma Echevarría-Pérez & Isabel Morales-Moreno - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (3):196-204.
    Background The birth plan is a tool that allows the self-learning and thoughtful analysis of the women during the birthing process, facilitating their making of decisions and participation, in agreement with the bioethical principles of autonomy and no malfeasance. Goal: To understand the perception and satisfaction of women who presented a birth plan. Methodology: Qualitative, descriptive, observational, retrospective and cross-sectional study. The population of the study was composed of 21 women who presented a birth plan regulated in a Hospital ever (...)
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  11.  40
    Heuristic Formulation of a Contextual Statistic Theory for Groundwater.O. López-Corona, P. Padilla, O. Escolero & E. Morales-Casique - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (1):75-83.
    Some of the most relevant problems today both in Science and practical problems involves Coupled Socio-ecological Systems, which are some of the best examples of Complex Systems. In this work we discuss groundwater-management as an example of these Coupled Socio-ecological System, also known as Coupled Human and Natural Systems. We argue that it is possible and even necessary to construct a contextual statistical theory of groundwater management. Contextuality implies some very different statistical features as entanglement and complementarity. We discuss some (...)
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  12.  72
    Moral Nihilism—So What?Lewis Williams - 2023 - Ethics 134 (1):108-121.
    Edward Elliott and Jessica Isserow argue that it is not usually in the best interests of ordinary human beings to learn the truth of moral nihilism. According to Elliott and Isserow, ordinary human beings would suffer costs from learning the truth of moral nihilism that are unlikely to be fully compensated for by any benefits. Here I provide reasons to doubt that ordinary human beings would suffer costs from learning the truth of moral nihilism (...)
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  13. Moral nihilism and its implications.Marc Krellenstein - 2017 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 38 (1):75-90.
    Philosophers have identified a number of principles that characterize morality and underlie moral judgments. However, philosophy has failed to establish any widely agreed-upon justification for these judgments, and an “error theory” that views moral judgments as without justification has not been successfully refuted. Evolutionary psychologists have had success in explaining the likely origins and mechanisms of morality but have also not established any justification for adopting particular values. As a result, we are left with moral nihilism (...)
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  14. Moral Nihilism, Intellectual Nihilism & Practical Ethics.Nathan Nobis - 2020 - Academia.Edu Letters.
    Arguments for moral nihilism—the view that there are no moral truths—are criticized by showing that their major premises suggest epistemic or intellectual nihilism—the view that no beliefs are reasonable, justified, ought to be believed, and so on. Insofar as intellectual nihilism ought be rejected, this shows that the major premises of arguments for moral nihilisms ought to be rejected also.
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  15.  54
    Moral Nihilism.Neil Cooper - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74:75 - 90.
    Neil Cooper; V*—Moral Nihilism, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 74, Issue 1, 1 June 1974, Pages 75–90, https://doi.org/10.1093/aristotelian/74.1.
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  16.  19
    V*—Moral Nihilism.Neil Cooper - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (1):75-90.
    Neil Cooper; V*—Moral Nihilism, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 74, Issue 1, 1 June 1974, Pages 75–90, https://doi.org/10.1093/aristotelian/74.1.
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  17. Moral Relativism and Moral Nihilism.Jamie Dreier - 2006 - In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford handbook of ethical theory. Oxford University Press USA.
  18. Climate Change Inaction and Moral Nihilism.Thomas Pölzler - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (2):202-214.
    The effects of anthropogenic climate change may be devastating. Nevertheless, most people do not seem to be seriously concerned. We consume as much as we always did, drive as much as we always did, eat as much meat as we always did. What can we do to overcome this collective apathy? In order to be able to develop effective measures, we must first get clear about the causes of climate change inaction. In this paper I ask whether moral (...) is a significant cause of climate change inaction. The answer to this question depends mainly on the extent to which being a moral nihilist reduces one's likelihood of taking action against climate change. At first sight, the extent seems to be considerable. I argue, however, that this assumption is false. Only slightly more non-nihilists than nihilists are led to climate-friendly actions by moral considerations. And in absolute terms, morality plays such a minor role in leading people to act that the difference is barely noticeable. (shrink)
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  19. Moral Relativism and Moral Nihilism.Jamie Dreier - 2006 - In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford handbook of ethical theory. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  20. How Does Moral Nihilism Affect our Taking Action against Climate Change?Thomas Pölzler - 2013 - Proceedings of the 13. International Conference of ISSEI.
    The effects of anthropogenic climate change will be devastating. Nevertheless, most people do not seem to be seriously concerned. We consume as much as we always did, drive as much as we always did, eat as much meat as we always did. What can we do to overcome this collective apathy? In order to be able to develop effective measures, we must first get clear about the causes of climate change inaction. In this paper I ask whether moral (...) (the denial of moral truths) is a significant cause of climate change inaction. The answer to this question depends mainly on the extent to which being a moral nihilist reduces one’s likelihood of taking action against climate change. At first sight, the extent seems to be considerable. I will argue, however, that this assumption is false. Only slightly more non-nihilists than nihilists are led to climate-friendly actions by moral considerations. And in absolute terms, morality plays such a minor role in leading people to act that the difference is barely noticeable. (shrink)
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  21.  12
    Applications of Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW]H. R. M. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (4):756-757.
    As its title implies, this collection of previously published popular essays and lectures by Hare attempts to bridge the gap between analytic ethics and moral and political issues. It succeeds in that endeavor only in so far as it, on the whole, provides some concrete illustrations for students of Hare’s theoretical positions; but the professional philosopher will seek in vain here for anything that is either new or incisive regarding the topics discussed. Worse still is the fact that a (...)
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  22. Two Challenges to Moral Nihilism.Michael Almeida - 2010 - The Monist 93 (1):96-105.
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  23. Twisted Pictures: morality, nihilism and symbolic suicide in the Saw series.Steve Jones - 2013 - In James Aston & John Walliss (eds.), To See the Saw Movies: Essays on Torture Porn and Post-9/11 Horror. McFarland. pp. 105-122.
    Given that numerous critics have complained about Saw’s apparently confused sense of ethics, it is surprising that little attention has been paid to how morality operates in narrative itself. Coming from a Nietzschean perspective - specifically questioning whether the lead torturer Jigsaw is a passive or a radical nihilist - I seek to rectify that oversight. This philosophical reading of the series explores Jigsaw’s moral stance, which is complicated by his hypocrisy: I contend that this underpins critical complaints regarding (...)
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  24. On Herbert J. Phillips’s “Why Be Rational?”.Max Harris Siegel - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):826-828,.
    In recent metaethics, moral realists have advanced a companions-in-guilt argument against moral nihilism. Proponents of this argument hold that the conclusion that there are no categorical normative reasons implies that there are no epistemic reasons. However, if there are no epistemic reasons, there are no epistemic reasons to believe nihilism. Therefore, nihilism is false or no one has epistemic reasons to believe it. While this argument is normally presented as a reply to Mackie, who introduced (...)
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  25.  37
    Twisted Pictures: morality, nihilism and symbolic suicide in the Saw series.Steve Jones - 2013 - In Jefferson McFarland (ed.), To See the Saw Movies: Essays on Torture Porn and Post-9/11 Horror. pp. 105-122.
    Given that numerous critics have complained about Saw’s apparently confused sense of ethics, it is surprising that little attention has been paid to how morality operates in narrative itself. Coming from a Nietzschean perspective - specifically questioning whether the lead torturer Jigsaw is a passive or a radical nihilist - I seek to rectify that oversight. This philosophical reading of the series explores Jigsaw’s moral stance, which is complicated by his hypocrisy: I contend that this underpins critical complaints regarding (...)
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  26.  15
    Do animal rights entail moral nihilism?Louis Pojman - 1993 - Public Affairs Quarterly 7 (2):165-185.
  27.  19
    The Limits of Doubt: The Moral and Political Implications of Skepticism (review). [REVIEW]José Maia Neto - 2002 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (4):551-552.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.4 (2002) 551-552 [Access article in PDF] Book Review The Limits of Doubt: The Moral and Political Implications of Skepticism Petr Lom. The Limits of Doubt: The Moral and Political Implications of Skepticism. Albany: The State University of New York Press, 2001. Pp. xiv + 138. Cloth, $49.50. Paper, $16.95. Since the appearance in 1960 of Richard Popkin's The History of (...)
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  28.  13
    The Howl of the Earth: on “the geology of morals,” nihilism, and the anthropocene.Aidan Tynan - 2022 - Angelaki 27 (5):3-16.
    This paper offers a close reading of “The Geology of Morals,” the third and possibly most important chapter, or plateau, of Deleuze and Guattari’s magnum opus A Thousand Plateaus. I analyse some of...
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  29. Nihilism and the epistemic profile of moral judgment.Jonas Olson - 2018 - In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. Routledge.
     
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  30.  15
    Philosophy Needs Literature: John Barth and Moral Nihilism.Jesse Kalin - 1977 - Philosophy and Literature 1 (2):170-182.
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  31.  39
    Noblesse Oblige: Theological Differences Between Humans and Animals and What They Imply Morally.Ryan Patrick McLaughlin - 2011 - Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (2):132-149.
    The author reviews the work of select theologians, ethicists, and biblical scholars who suggest that the difference between humans and animals should serve not solely as an ascription of a special status to humans but also as the foundation for a responsibility that humans bear toward animals. As an added reflection, the author explores common categorical differentiations in systematic theology: God and creation, human and nonhuman, elect and non-elect. In the first and last of these categorical differentiations, unique identity entails (...)
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  32. Moral Machines and the Threat of Ethical Nihilism.Anthony F. Beavers - 2011 - In Patrick Lin, George Bekey & Keith Abney (eds.), Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implication of Robotics.
    In his famous 1950 paper where he presents what became the benchmark for success in artificial intelligence, Turing notes that "at the end of the century the use of words and general educated opinion will have altered so much that one will be able to speak of machines thinking without expecting to be contradicted" (Turing 1950, 442). Kurzweil (1990) suggests that Turing's prediction was correct, even if no machine has yet to pass the Turing Test. In the wake of the (...)
     
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  33.  46
    Nihilism and the Epistemic Profile of Moral Judgment.Jonas Olson - 2018 - In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. New York: Routledge.
    Moral nihilism is the view that there are no moral facts or moral truths. It is the ontological component of moral error theory, which is the best-known and most comprehensive metaethical theory that involves moral nihilism. My main aim is to discuss some consequences of endorsing moral error theory or believing to some degree that moral error theory is true. In §2, I consider the implications for ordinary moral thought and (...)
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  34. How “ought” exceeds but implies “can”: Description and encouragement in moral judgment.John Turri - 2017 - Cognition 168 (C):267-275.
    This paper tests a theory about the relationship between two important topics in moral philosophy and psychology. One topic is the function of normative language, specifically claims that one “ought” to do something. Do these claims function to describe moral responsibilities, encourage specific behavior, or both? The other topic is the relationship between saying that one “ought” to do something and one’s ability to do it. In what respect, if any, does what one “ought” to do exceed what (...)
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  35. `Ought implies can' and two kinds of morality.John Kekes - 1984 - Philosophical Quarterly 34 (137):459-467.
    The principle, Ought implies can, Has two versions. The strong version expresses a necessary condition for the appropriateness of moral judgments; the weak version expresses a possible ground for excusing wrongdoing. The strong version is presupposed by choice-Morality, While the weak one is presupposed by character-Morality. It is argues that the strong version and choice-Morality are mistaken and that the weak version and character-Morality give a much more plausible account of our moral experience. The general conclusion is that (...)
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  36. Moral Pluralism in an Age of Partial and Incomplete Nihilism.J. Ci - unknown
     
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  37. Nihilism and Moral Pluralism'.J. Ci - unknown
     
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  38. Ordinary Morality Implies Atheism.Stephen Maitzen - 2009 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 1 (2):107 - 126.
    I present a "moral argument" for the nonexistence of God. Theism, I argue, can’t accommodate an ordinary and fundamental moral obligation acknowledged by many people, including many theists. My argument turns on a principle that a number of philosophers already accept as a constraint on God’s treatment of human beings. I defend the principle against objections from those inclined to reject it.
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  39.  44
    “Ought” implies “can”, or, the moral relevance of a theory of the firm.John R. Danley - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (1-2):23 - 28.
    Since ought implies can, i.e., one cannot be obligated to do what one cannot do, the question of corporate responsibility cannot be discussed intelligibly without an inquiry into the range of corporate or managerial discretion. Hence, the moral relevance of a theory of the firm. Within classical or neo-classical economic theory, for instance, firms which act other than to maximize profit are eliminated. They cannot do otherwise, and thus either have no obligations at all or only the duty to (...)
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  40. Blame, not ability, impacts moral “ought” judgments for impossible actions: Toward an empirical refutation of “ought” implies “can”.Vladimir Chituc, Paul Henne, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard - 2016 - Cognition 150 (C):20-25.
    Recently, psychologists have explored moral concepts including obligation, blame, and ability. While little empirical work has studied the relationships among these concepts, philosophers have widely assumed such a relationship in the principle that “ought” implies “can,” which states that if someone ought to do something, then they must be able to do it. The cognitive underpinnings of these concepts are tested in the three experiments reported here. In Experiment 1, most participants judge that an agent ought to keep a (...)
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  41. Moral Rights and the Limits of the Ought‐Implies‐Can Principle: Why Impeccable Precautions are No Excuse.Matthew H. Kramer - 2005 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 48 (4):307 – 355.
    This essay argues against the commonly held view that "ought" implies "can" in the domain of morality. More specifically, I contest the notion that nobody should ever be held morally responsible for failing to avoid the infliction of any harm that he or she has not been able to avoid through all reasonably feasible precautions in the carrying out of some worthwhile activity. The article explicates the concept of a moral right in order to show why violations of (...) rights can occur even when no one has acted wrongfully in any fashion. In so doing, it will effectively be maintaining that strict liability (i.e., liability irrespective of the presence or absence of culpability) exists in morality as well as in law. When we take account of the distinction between exoneration and extenuation, we can see that scrupulously thorough precautions are never sufficient to constitute an excuse in morality. Having made that point with some extended examples, the article goes on to consider a number of possible objections - objections that lead into discussions of some basic distinctions within moral philosophy and some central principles within deontic logic. (shrink)
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  42. Moral dilemmas, disjunctive obligations, and Kant's principle that 'ought' implies 'can'.Dale Jacquette - 1991 - Synthese 88 (1):43 - 55.
    In moral dilemmas, where circumstances prevent two or more equally justified prima facie ethical requirements from being fulfilled, it is often maintained that, since the agent cannot do both, conjoint obligation is overridden by Kant's principle that ought implies can, but that the agent nevertheless has a disjunctive obligation to perform one of the otherwise obligatory actions or the other. Against this commonly received view, it is demonstrated that although Kant's ought-can principle may avoid logical inconsistency, the principle is (...)
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  43. Nihilism and scepticism about moral obligations.Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 1995 - Utilitas 7 (2):228-236.
    There are many disagreements about what people have moral obligations to do, but almost everyone believes that some people have some moral obligations. Moreover, there are some moral obligations in which almost everyone believes. For example, if I promise to give a talk at this conference, I have a moral obligation to do so. Of course, my obligation might be overridden. Moreover, even if my obligation were overridden, I would still have a moral obligation to (...)
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  44.  75
    Ordinary morality does not imply atheism.T. Ryan Byerly - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):85-96.
    Many theist as well as many atheist philosophers have maintained that if God exists, then every instance of undeserved, unwanted suffering ultimately benefits the sufferer. Recently, several authors have argued that this implication of theism conflicts with ordinary morality. I show that these arguments all rest on a common mistake. Defenders of these arguments overlook the role of merely potential instances of suffering in determining our moral obligations toward suffering.
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  45. “‘Ought’ implies ‘can’” and the scope of moral requirements.Terrance McConnell - 1989 - Philosophia 19 (4):437-454.
    This paper examines two contexts in ethical theory that some have thought support the claim that attempts, rather than actions, are what are morally required of agents. In each context there is an appeal to the principle that 'ought' implies 'can'. I begin by explaining how I think appeals to this principle typically work. I conclude that not only do the contexts in question not demonstrate that moral requirements range over attempts, but also that any argument in support of (...)
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  46. Does Moral Obligation Imply the Future Life?R. Corkey - 1934 - Hibbert Journal 33:421.
     
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  47.  85
    Slave Morality, Will to Power, and Nihilism in On the Genealogy of Morality.Iain Morrisson - 2001 - International Studies in Philosophy 33 (3):127-144.
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  48.  17
    'Ought-implies-can', causal determinism and moral responsibility.J. M. Fischer - 2003 - Analysis 63 (3):244-250.
  49. Nihilism and the epistemic profile of moral judgment.Jonas Olson - 2018 - In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. New York: Routledge.
     
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  50. ‘Ought-implies-can’, causal determinism and moral responsibility.John Martin Fischer - 2003 - Analysis 63 (3):244–250.
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