Search results for 'Kant's theory of matter' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  91
    Michela Massimi (2011). Kant's Dynamical Theory of Matter in 1755, and its Debt to Speculative Newtonian Experimentalism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):525-543.
    This paper explores the scientific sources behind Kant’s early dynamic theory of matter in 1755, with a focus on two main Kant’s writings: Universal Natural History and Theory of the Heavens and On Fire. The year 1755 has often been portrayed by Kantian scholars as a turning point in the intellectual career of the young Kant, with his much debated conversion to Newton. Via a careful analysis of some salient themes in the two aforementioned works, and a (...)
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  2.  2
    Paolo Pecere (2016). Monadology, Materialism and Newtonian Forces: The Turn in Kant’s Theory of Matter. Quaestio 16:167-189.
    Kant elaborated his dynamical theory of matter in two quite different systematic accounts, the first in the Monadologia physica, the second in the Dynamics chapter of the Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft. In this paper I investigate the transition from the monadological to the “continuum” dynamical theory of matter, whose exact timing and motives are not explicitly clarified in Kant’s writings. I locate Kant’s turn around the middle 1760s, presenting Kant’s abandonment of his own physical monadology as (...)
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  3.  13
    Sebastian Rand (2012). Apriority, Metaphysics, and Empirical Content in Kant's Theory of Matter. Kantian Review 17 (1):109-134.
    This paper addresses problems associated with the role of the empirical concept of matter in Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, offering an interpretation emphasizing two points consistently neglected in the secondary literature: the distinction between logical and real essence, and Kant's claim that motion must be represented in pure intuition by static geometrical figures. I conclude that special metaphysics cannot achieve its stated and systematically justified goal of discovering the real essence of matter, but that (...)
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  4.  38
    Ralph C. S. Walker (1971). The Status of Kant's Theory of Matter. Synthese 23 (1):121 - 126.
    The four sections of the Metaphysische Anfangsgründe der Naturwissenschaft 1 are each introduced by a new definition of matter. For the Phoronomy it is defined as the movable in space (Ak. IV, 480); the other defini­tions presuppose this one. What is the status of the propositions ascribing existence to matter in these senses? Are the metaphysical principles of natural science as pure as the principles of pure understanding, or are they only required for experience which happens, in fact, (...)
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  5.  19
    Konstantin Pollok (2002). "Fabricating a World in Accordance with Mere Fantasy..."? The Origins of Kant's Critical Theory of Matter. Review of Metaphysics 56 (1):61 - 97.
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  6.  36
    Lorne Falkenstein (1998). A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation of Mendelssohn's Proof of the Immortality of the Soul and its Implications for His Theory of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.
  7.  1
    Paul Guyer & Richard E. Aquila (1991). Representational Mind: A Study of Kant's Theory of Knowledge.Matter in Mind: A Study of Kant's Transcendental Deduction. Philosophical Review 100 (4):703.
  8.  6
    Daniel Rothbart & Irmgard Scherer (1997). Kant's Critique of Judgment and the Scientific Investigation of Matter. Hyle 3 (1):65 - 80.
    Kant's theory of judgment establishes the conceptual framework for understanding the subtle relationships between the experimental scientist, the modern instrument, and nature's atomic particles. The principle of purposiveness which governs judgment has also a role in implicitly guiding modern experimental science. In Part 1 we explore Kant's philosophy of science as he shows how knowledge of material nature and unobservable entities is possible. In Part 2 we examine the way in which Kant's treatment of judgment, with (...)
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  9. Kenneth R. Westphal (1998). On Hegel’s Early Critique of Kant’s Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. In S. Houlgate (ed.), Hegel and the Philosophy of Nature. SUNY.
    In 1801 Hegel charged that, on Kant’s analysis, forces are ‘either purely ideal, in which case they are not forces, or else they are transcendent’. I argue that this objection, which Hegel did not spell out, reveals an important and fundamental line of internal criticism of Kant’s Critical philosophy. I show that Kant’s basic forces of attraction and repulsion, which constitute matter, are merely ideal because Kant’s arguments for them are circular and beg the question, and they have no (...)
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  10. Kenneth R. Westphal (1995). Kant’s Proof of the Law of Inertia. In H. Robinson (ed.), Proceedings of the 8th International Kant Congress. Marquette University Press.
    According to Kant’s Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science, a proper science is organized according to rational principles and has a pure a priori rational part, its metaphysical foundation. In the second edition Preface to the first Critique, Kant claims that his account of time explains the a priori possibility of Newton’s laws of motion. I argue that Kant’s proof of the law of inertia fails, and that this casts doubt on Kant’s enterprise of providing a priori foundations for Newton’s physics.
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  11.  33
    Phillip R. Sloan (2002). Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori. Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (2):229-253.
    Phillip R. Sloan - Performing the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori - Journal of the History of Philosophy 40:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 40.2 229-253 Preforming the Categories: Eighteenth-Century Generation Theory and the Biological Roots of Kant's A Priori Phillip R. Sloan Situating Kant's philosophical project in relation to the natural sciences of his day has been of concern to several scholars from both the history of (...)
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  12.  23
    Helga Varden (2016). Self-Governance and Reform in Kant’s Liberal Republicanism - Ideal and Non-Ideal Theory in Kant’s Doctrine of Right. Dois Pontos 13 (2).
    Received 05 November 2015. Accepted 30 January 2016.doispontos:, Curitiba, São Carlos, volume 13, número 2, p. 39-70, outubro de 201639Self-governance and reform in Kant’s liberal republicanism – ideal and non-ideal theory in Kant’s Doctrine of RightHelga Vardenhelga.vargen@gmail.comUniversity of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, EUAAbstract: At the heart of Kant’s legal-political philosophy lies a liberal, republican ideal of justice understood in terms of private independence (non-domination) and subjection to public laws securing freedom for all citizens as equals. Given this basic commitment of Kant’s, (...)
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  13. Charles Nussbaum (1988). The Manifold of Intuition and the Form-Matter Distinction in Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason". Dissertation, Emory University
    Kant is the last classical practitioner of foundationalist epistemology in the Cartesian tradition, a tradition which saw the major problem of the theory of knowledge as one of providing a metaphysical account of the way in which the subjective contents of the individual mind come to have indubitable objective reference. But he is also the inaugurator of a very different approach to epistemology, one that sees methodology or rules of cognitive procedure as fundamental in determining the objectivity of knowledge. (...)
     
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  14. Kenneth F. Rogerson (1981). Kant's Aesthetic Theory: The Roles of Form and Expression. Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    Kant's "Critique of Aesthetic Judgement," which is the first part of his larger Critique of Judgement, is enjoying a renewed interest. This renewed interest, however, has brought with it a renewed controversy over just how Kant's aesthetic theory should be understood. Of the many interpretative questions at issue, perhaps the most fundamental is what it is about an object, on Kant's accounting, that makes it beautiful. Traditionally, Kant has been understood as holding a formalist theory (...)
     
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  15.  6
    Richard E. Aquila (1989). Matter in Mind a Study of Kant's Transcendental Deduction.
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  16.  11
    Graham Bird (1966). Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Outline of One Central Argument in the Critique of Pure Reason. Philosophical Review 75 (1):113-116.
    First published in 1962. Kant’s philosophical works, and especially the _Critique of Pure Reason_, have had some influence on recent British philosophy. But the complexities of Kant’s arguments, and the unfamiliarity of his vocabulary, inhibit understanding of his point of view. In _Kant’s Theory of Knowledge _an attempt is made to relate Kant’s arguments in the _Critique of Pure Reason _to contemporary issues by expressing them in a more modern idiom. The selection of issues discussed is intended to present (...)
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  17. Benjamin Vilhauer (2008). Incompatibilism and Ontological Priority in Kant's Theory of Free Will. In Pablo Muchnik (ed.), Incompatibilism and Ontological Priority in Kant's Theory of Free Will.
    This paper concerns the role of the transcendental distinction between agents qua phenomena and qua noumena in Kant's theory of free will. It argues (1) that Kant's incompatibilism can be accommodated if one accepts the "ontological" interpretation of this distinction (i.e. the view that agents qua noumena are ontologically prior to agents qua phenomena), and (2) that Kant's incompatibilism cannot be accommodated by the "two-aspect" interpretation, whose defining feature is the rejection of the ontological priority of (...)
     
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  18.  10
    Samuel Mansell (2013). Shareholder Theory and Kant's 'Duty of Beneficence'. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):583-599.
    This article draws on the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant to explore whether a corporate ‘duty of beneficence’ to non-shareholders is consistent with the orthodox ‘shareholder theory’ of the firm. It examines the ethical framework of Milton Friedman’s argument and asks whether it necessarily rules out the well-being of non-shareholders as a corporate objective. The article examines Kant’s distinction between ‘duties of right’ and ‘duties of virtue’ (the latter including the duty of beneficence) and investigates their consistency with the (...)
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  19. Philip J. Kain (1989). Kant's Political Theory and Philosophy of History. Clio 18 (4):325-45.
    The importance of Kant's political thought can best be understood if we do two things: if we compare it to political theory as it existed before Kant and if we see how it fundamentally depends upon his philosophy of history. It is Kant's philosophy of history that allows him to take a major step beyond previous political thinkers. Kant brings together for the first time two projects which had traditionally remained separate. He develops a theory of (...)
     
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  20.  16
    Karin de Boer (2016). Categories Versus Schemata: Kant's Two-Aspect Theory of Pure Concepts and His Critique of Wolffian Metaphysics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (3):441-468.
    in a late note, dated 1797, Kant refers to the schematism of the pure understanding as one of the most difficult as well as one of the most important issues treated in the Critique of Pure Reason.1 His treatment of this theme is indeed notorious for its obscurity.2 As I see it, part of the problem is caused by the fact that Kant frames his discussion in terms that he could expect his readers to be familiar with, while he gradually (...)
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  21.  55
    Jennifer McRobert, Kant on Mathematical Construction and Quantity of Matter.
    Kant's special metaphysics is intended to provide the a priori foundation for Newtonian science, which is to be achieved by exhibiting the a priori content of Newtonian concepts and laws. Kant envisions a two-step mathematical construction of the dynamical concept of matter involving a geometrical construction of matter’s bulk and a symbolic construction of matter’s density. Since Newton himself defines quantity of matter in terms of bulk and density, there is no reason why we shouldn’t (...)
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  22.  17
    Georges Dicker (2004). Kant's Theory of Knowledge: An Analytical Introduction. Oup Usa.
    Kant's masterpiece, Critique of Pure Reason, is universally recognized to be among the most difficult of all philosophical writing, and yet it is required reading in almost every course that covers modern philosophy. Most students find Critique of Pure Reason impenetrable without the help of secondary sources. While there are numerous advanced scholarly works on the topic, Dicker's is the first treatment explicitly designed for undergraduates to read alongside the primary text, rendering Kant's views accessible without oversimplifying them. (...)
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  23. Andrew Chignell (2007). Review: Dicker, Georges, Kant's Theory of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 116 (2):307-309.
  24. Marius Stan (2009). Kant's Early Theory of Motion. The Leibniz Review 19:29-61.
    This paper examines the young Kant’s claim that all motion is relative, and argues that it is the core of a metaphysical dynamics of impact inspired by Leibniz and Wolff. I start with some background to Kant’s early dynamics, and show that he rejects Newton’s absolute space as a foundation for it. Then I reconstruct the exact meaning of Kant’s relativity, and the model of impact he wants it to support. I detail (in Section II and III) his polemic engagement (...)
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  25. Hannah Ginsborg (1990). The Role of Taste in Kant's Theory of Cognition. Garland.
    Drawing on Kant's hints in the Critique of Judgment that his theory of taste is of importance to his system as a whole, I argue that Kant's theory of taste is an attempt to give content to a central presupposition of his theory of cognition. This is the presupposition that human beings are inherently capable of judgment, that is of taking individual subjective states of mind to be intersubjectively valid and to conform to a universal (...)
     
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  26.  69
    Jean-Christophe Merle (2000). A Kantian Critique of Kant's Theory of Punishment. Law and Philosophy 19 (3):311 - 338.
    In contrast to the traditional view of Kant as apure retributivist, the recent interpretations ofKant's theory of punishment (for instance Byrd's)propose a mixed theory of retributivism and generalprevention. Although both elements are literallyright, I try to show the shortcomings of each. I thenargue that Kant's theory of punishment is notconsistent with his own concept of law. Thus I proposeanother justification for punishment: specialdeterrence and rehabilitation. Kant's critique ofutilitarianism does not affect this alternative, whichmoreover has textual (...)
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  27.  36
    Justus Hartnack (1968). Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Melbourne [Etc.]Macmillan.
    The significance of Kant's philosophy is to be found primarily in his theory of knowledge, a theory that is set forth in his voluminous work, The Critique ...
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  28.  15
    Meade McCloughan, Kant's Theory of Progress.
    My topic is Kant’s theory of historical progress. My approach is primarily textual and contextual. I analyse in some detail Kant’s three most important essays on the topic: ‘Idea for a Universal History’, the third part of ‘Theory and Practice’ and the second part of The Conflict of the Faculties. I devote particular attention to the Kant-Herder debate about progress, but also discuss Rousseau, Mendelssohn, Hegel and others. In presenting, on Kant’s behalf, a strong case for his (...) of progress, I address the main objections which have been put to it. These are: (i) historical teleology is incoherent (history can’t have a goal because there is no intentional actor functioning at the historical level); (ii) historical teleology undermines morality (if things are getting better anyway, why do I have to try to make them better?); (iii) progress involves ‘chronological unfairness’ (if things are getting better, doesn’t this mean that earlier generations get a raw deal?); (iv) progress consigns the species to ‘spurious infinity’ (isn’t endless improvement endlessly unsatisfactory?); (v) progress amounts to pernicious homogenization (doesn’t the elimination of traditional practices and values impoverish our world?); (vi) the idea of progress is just ‘secularized’ religion (and should be rejected accordingly). In relation to (vi), I consider the Löwith-Blumenberg debate, and draw some general conclusions about the issue of ‘secularization’. In relating these to Kant, I argue for the following position: (a) his theory of progress is more than merely secularized religion; (b) to the extent that it can be described in terms of the secularization thesis, this reflects his ‘critical’ endeavour to rationalize Christianity; (c) in any case, the idea of progress by no means exhausts the rational potential of religion, and so should not be seen as intended to replace the latter. (shrink)
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  29.  31
    Charles DeBord (2012). Geist and Communication in Kant's Theory of Aesthetic Ideas. Kantian Review 17 (2):177-190.
    In his Critique of the Power of Judgement, Kant explicates the creation of works of fine art (schöne Kunst) in terms of aesthetic ideas. His analysis of aesthetic ideas claims that they are not concepts (Begriffe) and are therefore not definable or describable in determinate language. Nevertheless, Kant claims that aesthetic ideas are communicable via spirit (Geist), a special mental ability he associates with artistic genius. This paper argues that Kant's notion of Geist is central to his analysis of (...)
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  30.  40
    Samantha Matherne (2015). Images and Kant’s Theory of Perception. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    My aim in this paper is to offer a systematic analysis of a feature of Kant’s theory of perception that tends to be overlooked, viz., his account of how the imagination forms images in perception. Although Kant emphasizes the centrality of this feature of perception, indeed, calling it a ‘necessary ingredient’ of perception, commentators have instead focused primarily on his account of sensibility and intuitions on the one hand, and understanding and concepts on the other. However, I show that (...)
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  31.  7
    Robert Pippin (1982). Kant's Theory of Form: An Essay on the Critique of Pure Reason. Yale University Press.
  32. Susanne Bobzien (2013). Kant's Categories of Freedom. In Kant - Analysen, Probleme, Kritik (English translation of 1988 article).
    ABSTRACT: A general interpretation and close textual analysis of Kant’s theory of the categories of freedom (or categories of practical reason) in his Critique of Practical Reason. My main concerns in the paper are the following: (1) I show that Kant’s categories of freedom have primarily three functions: as conditions of the possibility for actions (i) to be free, (ii) to be comprehensible as free and (iii) to be morally evaluated. (2) I show that for Kant actions, although qua (...)
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  33. Paul Formosa (2011). From Discipline to Autonomy: Kant's Theory of Moral Development. In Klas Roth & Chris W. Surprenant (eds.), Kant and Education: Interpretations and Commentary. Routledge. pp. 163--176.
    Issues surrounding moral development and education form one of the major themes of Kant’s philosophical output. But Kant’s keen interest in this area seems to raise a number of significant tensions in his work. These tensions arise because, depending on which strand of thought we focus on, education and development seem either essential or superfluous for morality. We shall examine two versions of this tension here, which I shall call the knowledge and revolution tensions. The knowledge tension arises because Kant (...)
     
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  34.  91
    Karl Ameriks (1982). Kant's Theory of Mind: An Analysis of the Paralogisms of Pure Reason. Oxford University Press.
    This seminal contribution to Kant studies, originally published in 1982, was the first to present a thorough survey and evaluation of Kant's theory of mind. Ameriks focuses on Kant's discussion of the Paralogisms in the Critique of Pure Reason, and examines how the themes raised there are treated in the rest of Kant's writings. Ameriks demonstrates that Kant developed a theory of mind that is much more rationalistic and defensible than most interpreters have allowed.
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  35.  57
    Benjamin Vilhauer (2010). The Scope of Responsibility in Kant's Theory of Free Will. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):45-71.
    In this paper, I discuss a problem for Kant's strategy of appealing to the agent qua noumenon to undermine the significance of determinism in his theory of free will. I then propose a solution. The problem is as follows: given determinism, how can some agent qua noumenon be 'the cause of the causality' of the appearances of that agent qua phenomenon without being the cause of the entire empirical causal series? This problem has been identified in the literature (...)
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  36.  59
    Kristina Engelhard & Peter Mittelstaedt (2008). Kant's Theory of Arithmetic: A Constructive Approach? [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 39 (2):245 - 271.
    Kant’s theory of arithmetic is not only a central element in his theoretical philosophy but also an important contribution to the philosophy of arithmetic as such. However, modern mathematics, especially non-Euclidean geometry, has placed much pressure on Kant’s theory of mathematics. But objections against his theory of geometry do not necessarily correspond to arguments against his theory of arithmetic and algebra. The goal of this article is to show that at least some important details in Kant’s (...)
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  37. Jeffrey Edwards (2002). Substance, Force, and the Possibility of Knowledge. On Kant's Philosophy of Material Nature (R. Langton). Philosophical Books 43 (2):148-149.
    A new understanding of Kant’s theory of a priori knowledge and his natural philosophy emerges from Jeffrey Edwards’s mature and penetrating study. In the Third Analogy of Experience, Kant argues for the existence of a dynamical plenum in space. This argument against empty space demonstrates that the dynamical plenum furnishes an a priori necessary condition for our experience and knowledge of an objective world. Such an a priori existence proof, however, transgresses the limits Kant otherwise places on transcendental arguments (...)
     
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  38.  25
    Eric Watkins & Marius Stan (2014). Kant's Philosophy of Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  39. Thom Brooks (2003). Kant's Theory of Punishment. Utilitas 15 (2):206.
    The most widespread interpretation amongst contemporary theorists of Kant's theory of punishment is that it is retributivist. On the contrary, I will argue there are very different senses in which Kant discusses punishment. He endorses retribution for moral law transgressions and consequentialist considerations for positive law violations. When these standpoints are taken into consideration, Kant's theory of punishment is more coherent and unified than previously thought. This reading uncovers a new problem in Kant's theory (...)
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  40.  11
    E. Aquila Richard (1983). Representational Mind: A Study of Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 100 (4):703-710.
  41. Andrew Chignell & Derk Pereboom (2010). Kant's Theory of Causation and its Eighteenth-Century German Background. Philosophical Review 119 (4):565-591.
    This critical notice highlights the important contributions that Eric Watkins's writings have made to our understanding of theories about causation developed in eighteenth-century German philosophy and by Kant in particular. Watkins provides a convincing argument that central to Kant's theory of causation is the notion of a real ground or causal power that is non-Humean (since it doesn't reduce to regularities or counterfactual dependencies among events or states) and non-Leibnizean because it doesn't reduce to logical or conceptual relations. (...)
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  42. C. Thomas Powell (1990). Kant's Theory of Self-Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    From Descartes to Hume, philosophers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries developed a dialectic of radically conflicting claims about the nature of the self. In the Paralogisms of The Critique of Pure Reason, Kant comes to terms with this dialectic and with the character of the experiencing self. In this study, Powell seeks to elucidate these difficult texts, showing that the structure of the Paralogisms provides an essential key to understanding both Kant's critique of "rational psychology" and his (...) of self-consciousness. As Kant realized, the ways in which we must represent ourselves to ourselves have import not only for epistemology, but for our view of persons and of our own immortality, as well as for moral philosophy. His theory of self-consciousness is also shown to have implications for contemporary discussions of the problem of other minds, functionalism, and the problem of indexical self-reference. (shrink)
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  43.  20
    Thomas Sturm (2014). ‘Kant Our Contemporary’? Kitcher on the Fruitfulness of Kant's Theory of the Cognitive Subject. Kantian Review 19 (1):135-141.
    In chapter 15 of Kant's Thinker, Patricia Kitcher claims that we can treat Kant as , and that his theory of apperception new. I question this with respect to two of her four chosen topics. First, I address her attempt to show that Kant's theory of apperceptive self-knowledge is immune to sceptical doubts of the sort Barry Stroud presents. Second, I turn to her argument that this theory is superior to current accounts of the special (...)
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  44.  21
    Wong Kwok Kui (2010). Schelling's Criticism of Kant's Theory of Time. Idealistic Studies 40 (1/2):83-102.
    This paper aims at engaging Kant’s and Schelling’s theories of time in dialogue. It begins with Schelling’s famous criticism of Kant’s theory of time in his Weltalter (Ages of the World). It will examine this question from four main perspectives, namely the unity of time; time and a unitary object of experience;subjectivity of time; and the problem of infinity of time. It will show that Schelling’s criticism may instigate some fundamental reflections on Kant’s theory oftime, the relation between (...)
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  45.  61
    Alexander Rueger & Sahan Evren (2005). The Role of Symbolic Presentation in Kant's Theory of Taste. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (3):229-247.
    Beauty, or at least natural beauty, is famously a symbol of the morally good in Kant's theory of taste. Natural beauty is also, we argue, a symbol of the systematicity of nature. This symbolic connection of beauty and systematicity in nature sheds light on the relation between the principles underlying the use of reflecting judgement. The connection also motivates a more general interpretive proposal: the fact that the imagination can symbolize ideas plays a crucial role in the (...) of taste; it is the mechanism that underlies pure judgements of taste, the operation by which the imagination ‘schematizes without a concept’. (shrink)
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  46. Thomas Pogge (1988). Kant's Theory of Justice. Kant-Studien 79 (1-4):407-433.
    Following the tradition of classical liberalism, Kant's political philosophy and theory of justice focus on the relation between individual freedom, as the central value of political life, and the state, whose primary normative function is both to restrain and protect individual liberty. In this accessible interpretation of Kant's political philosophy, Allen D. Rosen focuses on the relation among justice, political authority (the state), and individual liberty. He offers interpretations of the ethical bases of Kant's view of (...)
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  47. B. Sharon Byrd (1989). Kant's Theory of Punishment: Deterrence in its Threat, Retribution in its Execution. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 8 (2):151 - 200.
    Kant's theory of punishment is commonly regarded as purely retributive in nature, and indeed much of his discourse seems to support that interpretation. Still, it leaves one with certain misgivings regarding the internal consistency of his position. Perhaps the problem lies not in Kant's inconsistency nor in the senility sometimes claimed to be apparent in the Metaphysic of Morals, but rather in a superimposed, modern yet monistic view of punishment. Historical considerations tend to show that Kant was (...)
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  48.  19
    Sean Drysdale Walsh (2012). Kant's Theory of Right as Aristotelian Phronesis. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):227-246.
    Many philosophers believe that a moral theory, given all the relevant facts, should be able to determine what is morally right and wrong. It is commonly argued that Aristotle’s ethical theory suffers from a fatal flaw: it places responsibility for determining right and wrong with the virtuous agent who has phronesis rather than with the theory itself. It is also commonly argued that Immanuel Kant’s ethical theory does provide a concept of right that is capable of (...)
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  49. Paul Crowther (1987). The Structure and Significance of Kant's Theory of the Sublime. Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;Kant's extensive discussion of the sublime has received scant attention. This neglect, indeed, is a general characteristic of the reception of Kant's aesthetics in the Anglo-American, and German traditions of philosophy in the twentieth century. The reasons behind it have been usefully summarised by Paul Guyer. ;My approach will be as follows. In Part One of this study , I shall first outline the sublime as it (...)
     
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  50.  72
    Carlos Fraenkel (2009). Maimonides and Spinoza as Sources for Maimon's Solution of the “Problem Quid Juris ” in Kant's Theory of Knowledge. Kant-Studien 100 (2):212-240.
    Maimon once described the philosophical project underlying his Essay on Transcendental Philosophy as an attempt “to unify Kantian philosophy with Spinozism ”. But in the only reference to Spinoza in the Essay , he stresses that Spinoza was not the source of his argument. In this paper I will argue that, notwithstanding the disclaimer, Maimon's solution for the problems that in his view haunted Kant's theory of knowledge was indeed significantly influenced by Spinoza, as well as by the (...)
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