Results for 'Margaret Ashcroft'

999 found
Order:
  1.  2
    Ashcroft M. Hypoxia—Inducible Factor—la Nd Oncogenie Signalling.Julia I. Bárdos & Margaret Ashcroft - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (3):262-269.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  4
    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 and Oncogenic Signalling.Julia I. Bárdos & Margaret Ashcroft - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (3):262-269.
  3.  20
    Fair Process and the Redundancy of Bioethics: A Polemic.Richard Ashcroft - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (1):3-9.
    Queen Mary, University of London, School of Law, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK. Tel: +442078825126, Fax: +442089818733, Email: r.ashcroft{at}qmul.ac.uk ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Recent doctrine in both national and international organisations concerned with public health planning and resource allocation has it that direct ethical justification of substantive decisions is so difficult as to be impossible. Instead, we should agree on criteria of procedural justice and reach decisions whose justification lies in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  4.  11
    Drugs Symposium: Introduction.R. E. Ashcroft - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):332-332.
    Deputy Editor Richard Ashcroft introduces four papers on drugs and autonomyIn this symposium we bring together four papers which consider novel approaches to the use and response to what are popularly known as “drugs”. The language available here is not altogether helpful—the drugs discussed have very different pharmacological effects, social acceptability, long and short term psychological effects, medical uses, and legal status.1 Arguably, the way these three drugs are considered as constituting a unified medical field can only be understood (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  33
    Children's Consent to Research Participation: Social Context and Personal Experience Invalidate Fixed Cutoff Rules.Richard Ashcroft, Trudy Goodenough, Emma Williamson & Julie Kent - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (4):16 – 18.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  6.  47
    Access to Essential Medicines: A Hobbesian Social Contract Approach.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (2):121–141.
    ABSTRACTMedicines that are vital for the saving and preserving of life in conditions of public health emergency or endemic serious disease are known as essential medicines. In many developing world settings such medicines may be unavailable, or unaffordably expensive for the majority of those in need of them. Furthermore, for many serious diseases these essential medicines are protected by patents that permit the patent‐holder to operate a monopoly on their manufacture and supply, and to price these medicines well above marginal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  23
    Ethics and World Pictures in Kamm on Enhancement.Richard E. Ashcroft & Karen P. Gui - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):19 – 20.
  8.  19
    Hearing Silence: Organizing From an Aesthetic Perspective. [REVIEW]Karen Lee Ashcroft - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (4):413-421.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish.Karen Detlefsen - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3:199-240.
    Between 1653 and 1655 Margaret Cavendish makes a radical transition in her theory of matter, rejecting her earlier atomism in favour of an infinitely-extended and infinitely-divisible material plenum, with matter being ubiquitously self-moving, sensing, and rational. It is unclear, however, if Cavendish can actually dispense of atomism. One of her arguments against atomism, for example, depends upon the created world being harmonious and orderly, a premise Cavendish herself repeatedly undermines by noting nature’s many disorders. I argue that her supposed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  10.  80
    Color in a Material World: Margaret Cavendish Against the Early Modern Mechanists.Colin Chamberlain - 2019 - Philosophical Review 128 (3):293-336.
    Consider the distinctive qualitative property grass visually appears to have when it visually appears to be green. This property is an example of what I call sensuous color. Whereas early modern mechanists typically argue that bodies are not sensuously colored, Margaret Cavendish disagrees. In cases of veridical perception, she holds that grass is green in precisely the way it visually appears to be. In defense of her realist approach to sensuous colors, Cavendish argues that it is impossible to conceive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Margaret Cavendish on the Relation Between God and World.Karen Detlefsen - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (3):421-438.
    It has often been noted that Margaret Cavendish discusses God in her writings on natural philosophy far more than one might think she ought to given her explicit claim that a study of God belongs to theology which is to be kept strictly separate from studies in natural philosophy. In this article, I examine one way in which God enters substantially into her natural philosophy, namely the role he plays in her particular version of teleology. I conclude that, while (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Is Margaret Cavendish Worthy of Study Today?Jacqueline Broad - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (3):457-461.
    Before her death in 1673, Margaret Cavendish, the Duchess of Newcastle, expressed a wish that her philosophical work would experience a ‘glorious resurrection’ in future ages. During her lifetime, and for almost three centuries afterwards, her writings were destined to ‘lye still in the soft and easie Bed of Oblivion’. But more recently, Cavendish has received a measure of the fame she so desired. She is celebrated by feminists, literary theorists, and historians. There are regular conferences organised by the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Margaret A. Boden, Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science , 2 Vols. [REVIEW]Vincent C. Müller - 2008 - Minds and Machines 18 (1):121-125.
    Review of: Margaret A. Boden, Mind as Machine: A History of Cognitive Science, 2 vols, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006, xlvii+1631, cloth $225, ISBN 0-19-924144-9. - Mind as Machine is Margaret Boden’s opus magnum. For one thing, it comes in two massive volumes of nearly 1700 pages, ... But it is not just the opus magnum in simple terms of size, but also a truly crowning achievement of half a century’s career in cognitive science.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  34
    Margaret Thatcher's Christian Faith: A Case Study in Political Theology.Graeme Smith - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):233-257.
    Throughout the 1980s Margaret Thatcher dominated British and global politics. At the same time she maintained an active Christian faith, which she understood as shaping and informing her political choices and policies. In this article I argue that we can construct from Thatcher's key speeches, her memoirs, and her book on public policy a cultural "theo-political" identity which guided her political decisions. Thatcher's identity was as an Anglo-Saxon Nonconformist. This consisted of her belief in values such as thrift and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  35
    Stay the Night: Meera Margaret Singh at the Gladstone Hotel.Kerry Manders - 2012 - Mediatropes 3 (2):109-132.
    This essay examines Meera Margaret Singh’s exhibition Nightingale in the time and place of the liminal space we call “hotel.” In intertexual dialogue with Wayne Koestenbaum’s Hotel Theory, the author not only reviews Singh’s intimate photographs of her mother, she reads the images with and against the architecture in which they are exhibited. The Gladstone as exhibition space redoubles Singh’s emphasis on the tense connectivity of apparent binaries: youth and age, public and private, artist and model, object and spectator, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  18
    Riscrivere la storia, fare la storia. Sulla donna come soggetto in Christine de Pizan e Margaret Cavendish.Paola Rudan - 2016 - Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 28 (54).
    In The City of Ladies and Bell in Campo, Christine de Pizan and Margaret Cavendish imagine women’s participation to war as a metaphor of the sexual conflict that they must fight in order to conquer their visibility in history. While Pizan rewrites history from women’s stand point and acknowledges the universal value of sexual difference for the plan of salvation, Cavendish moves within a modern frame and thinks history as the result of human action. In both cases, the tale (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  14
    Margaret Fell.Jacqueline Broad - 2012 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    On the strength of her 1666 pamphlet, Womens Speaking Justified, the Quaker writer Margaret Fell has been hailed as a feminist pioneer. In this short tract, Fell puts forward several arguments in favour of women's preaching. She asserts the spiritual equality of the sexes, she appeals to female exempla in the Bible, and she reinterprets key scriptural passages that appear to endorse women's subordination to men. Some scholars, however, have questioned Fell's status as a feminist thinker. They point to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Philosopher of Language and Religion: Remembering Margaret Chatterjee.Muzaffar Ali - 2019 - Journal of World Philosophies 4 (2):173-177.
    This article sketches some of the main ideas that informed the work of the post-colonial Indian philosopher Margaret Chatterjee. A philosopher of language and religion, her work straddles the “frozen” traditions of the east and the west, and astutely philosophizes about Gandhian thought in the realm of religious alterity and coevality.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Margaret Cavendish's Epistemology.Kourken Michaelian1 - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):31 – 53.
    This paper provides a systematic reconstruction of Cavendish's general epistemology and a characterization of the fundamental role of that theory in her natural philosophy. After reviewing the outlines of her natural philosophy, I describe her treatment of 'exterior knowledge', i.e. of perception in general and of sense perception in particular. I then describe her treatment of 'interior knowledge', i.e. of self-knowledge and 'conception'. I conclude by drawing out some implications of this reconstruction for our developing understanding of Cavendish's natural philosophy.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20. Margaret S. Archer, Being Human: The Problem of Agency. [REVIEW]Thomas Sturm - 2001 - Metapsychology 5 (46).
    A review which, among other criticisms of Archer's book, discusses some philosophical problems concerning talk of the "self" in the human sciences.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Transfiguring America Myth, Ideology, and Mourning in Margaret Fuller's Writing.Jeffrey Steele - 2001
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature.Karen Detlefsen - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23. Margaret Cavendish and Thomas Hobbes on Freedom, Education, and Women.Karen Detlefsen - 2012 - In Nancy J. Hirschmann & Joanne H. Wright (eds.), Feminist Interpretations of Thomas Hobbes. The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 149-168.
    In this paper, I argue that Margaret Cavendish’s account of freedom, and the role of education in freedom, is better able to account for the specifics of women’s lives than are Thomas Hobbes’ accounts of these topics. The differences between the two is grounded in their differing conceptions of the metaphysics of human nature, though the full richness of Cavendish’s approach to women, their minds and their freedom can be appreciated only if we take account of her plays, accepting (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24. Margaret Cavendish and Joseph Glanvill: Science, Religion, and Witchcraft.Jacqueline Broad - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (3):493-505.
    Many scholars point to the close association between early modern science and the rise of rational arguments in favour of the existence of witches. For some commentators, it is a poor reflection on science that its methods so easily lent themselves to the unjust persecution of innocent men and women. In this paper, I examine a debate about witches between a woman philosopher, Margaret Cavendish , and a fellow of the Royal Society, Joseph Glanvill . I argue that Cavendish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  88
    Review of Moral Particularism (Ed. Brad Hooker and Margaret Little). [REVIEW]Pekka Väyrynen - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):478.
    This is a short review of Moral Particularism, ed. Brad Hooker and Margaret Little (Oxford University Press, 2002).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  26.  16
    Margaret Cavendish on Motion and Mereology.Alison Peterman - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):471-499.
    what is motion, according to Margaret Cavendish? There has been a groundswell of exciting work on Cavendish’s natural philosophy lately, all of which highlights her materialism, as well as the centrality of motion in her system.1 But none of it directly addresses this question in detail. Cavendish claims that motion grounds all qualitative and quantitative variety in matter, but we will not understand her explanations of natural phenomena if we do not know what motion is.In this paper, I argue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  88
    The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish by Deborah A. Boyle. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (2):349-350.
    Deborah Boyle's book is a splendid addition to the literature on the philosophy of Margaret Cavendish. It provides an overview of Cavendish's philosophical work, from her panpsychist materialism, through her views about human motivation and general political philosophy, to views about gender, health, and humans' relation to the rest of the natural world. Boyle emphasizes themes of order and regularity, but does not argue that there is a strong systematic connection between Cavendish's views. Indeed, she makes a point of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  3
    Identity, personhood and the law: a response to Ashcroft and McGee.C. Foster & J. Herring - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics Recent Issues 44 (1):73-74.
    We are very grateful to Richard Ashcroft 1 and Andrew McGee 2 for their thoughtful and articulate criticisms of our views. 3 Ashcroft has disappointingly low aspirations for the law. Of course he is right to say that the law is not a ‘self-sufficient, integrated and self-interpreting system of doctrine’. The law is often philosophically incoherent and internally contradictory. But it does not follow from this that all areas of the law are philosophically unsatisfactory. And if that were (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29.  99
    Margaret Cavendish on Perception, Self‐Knowledge, and Probable Opinion.Deborah Boyle - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (7):438-450.
    Scholarly interest in Margaret Cavendish's philosophical views has steadily increased over the past decade, but her epistemology has received little attention, and no consensus has emerged; Cavendish has been characterized as a skeptic, as a rationalist, as presenting an alternative epistemology to both rationalism and empiricism, and even as presenting no clear theory of knowledge at all. This paper concludes that Cavendish was only a modest skeptic, for she believed that humans can achieve knowledge through sensitive and rational perception (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  30. “Trust Me—I’M a Public Intellectual”: Margaret Atwood’s and David Suzuki’s Social Epistemologies of Climate Science.Boaz Miller - 2015 - In Michael Keren & Richard Hawkins‎ (eds.), Speaking Power to Truth: Digital Discourse and the Public Intellectual. Athabasca University Press‎. pp. 113-128.
    Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki are two of the most prominent Canadian public ‎intellectuals ‎involved in the global warming debate. They both argue that anthropogenic global ‎warming is ‎occurring, warn against its grave consequences, and urge governments and the ‎public to take ‎immediate, decisive, extensive, and profound measures to prevent it. They differ, ‎however, in the ‎reasons and evidence they provide in support of their position. While Suzuki ‎stresses the scientific ‎evidence in favour of the global warming theory and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. Margaret Cavendish, Environmental Ethics, and Panpsychism.Stewart Duncan - manuscript
    Margaret Cavendish (1623-73) held a number of surprising philosophical views. These included a materialist panpsychism, and some views in what we might call environmental ethics. Panpsychism, though certainly not unheard of, is still often a surprising view. Views in environmental ethics - even just views that involve a measure of environmental concern - are unusual to find in early modern European philosophy. Cavendish held both of these surprising views. One might suspect that panpsychism provides some reasons for environmental concern. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  83
    Double Effect, All Over Again: The Case of Sister Margaret McBride.Bernard G. Prusak - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):271-283.
    As media reports have made widely known, in November 2009, the ethics committee of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona, permitted the abortion of an eleven-week-old fetus in order to save the life of its mother. This woman was suffering from acute pulmonary hypertension, which her doctors judged would prove fatal for both her and her previable child. The ethics committee believed abortion to be permitted in this case under the so-called principle of double effect, but Thomas J. Olmsted, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  33.  37
    In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  85
    Margaret Cavendish on Gender, Nature, and Freedom.Deborah Boyle - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):516-532.
    Some scholars have argued that Margaret Cavendish was ambivalent about women's roles and capabilities, for she seems sometimes to hold that women are naturally inferior to men, but sometimes that this inferiority is due to inferior education. I argue that attention to Cavendish's natural philosophy can illuminate her views on gender. In section II I consider the implications of Cavendish's natural philosophy for her views on male and female nature, arguing that Cavendish thought that such natures were not fixed. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35. Minds Everywhere: Margaret Cavendish's Anti-Mechanist Materialism.Stewart Duncan - manuscript
    This paper considers Margaret Cavendish's distinctive anti-mechanist materialism, focusing on her 1664 Philosophical Letters, in which she discusses the views of Hobbes, Descartes, and More, among others. The paper examines Cavendish's views about natural, material souls: the soul of nature, the souls of finite individuals, and the relation between them. After briefly digressing to look at Cavendish's views about divine, supernatural souls, the paper then turns to the reasons for Cavendish's disagreement with mechanist accounts. There are disagreements over the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  48
    Constraints on the Internal Conversation: Margaret Archer and the Structural Shaping of Thought.Alistair Mutch - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (4):429–445.
    Margaret Archer has recently provided a persuasive account of the importance of the internal conversation to reflexivity. This raises questions about the shaping of such conversations by involuntary agential positioning. The work of Bourdieu and Bernstein is reviewed to suggest that structural influences can operate by condi-tioning the resources available for the conducting of the internal conversation. Particular emphasis is placed on the transfer of taken for granted ideas from one domain of practice to another.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37.  54
    Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Infinitude of Nature.Michael Bennett McNulty - 2018 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 35 (3):219-239.
    In this paper, I develop a new interpretation of the order of nature, its function, and its implications in Margaret Cavendish’s philosophy. According to the infinite balance account, the order of nature consists in a balance among the infinite varieties of nature. That is, for Cavendish, nature contains an infinity of different types of matter: infinite species, shapes, and motions. The potential tumult implicated by such a variety, however, is tempered by the counterbalancing of the different kinds and motions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  64
    The Oeconomy of Nature: An Interview with Margaret Schabas.Margaret Schabas & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2013 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 6 (2):66.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  6
    “Peculiar Circles”: The Fluid Utopia at the Northern Pole in Margaret Cavendish's Blazing World.Delilah Bermudez Brataas - 2019 - Utopian Studies 30 (2):214-237.
    Margaret Cavendish may not have described her prose narrative The Description of a New World, Called the Blazing World as a utopia, let alone assigned it a single genre or form. It contains aspects of romance, adventure, and fantasy and many of the elements that would come to be associated with utopian literature, such as world building and a detailed accounting of that world by a traveler who happens upon it. Yet The Blazing World also contains philosophy, scientific debates, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  24
    Collecting, Comparing, and Computing Sequences: The Making of Margaret O. Dayhoff's "Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure", 1954–1965. [REVIEW]Bruno J. Strasser - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (4):623 - 660.
    Collecting, comparing, and computing molecular sequences are among the most prevalent practices in contemporary biological research. They represent a specific way of producing knowledge. This paper explores the historical development of these practices, focusing on the work of Margaret O. Dayhoff, Richard V. Eck, and Robert S. Ledley, who produced the first computer-based collection of protein sequences, published in book format in 1965 as the Atlas of Protein Sequence and Structure. While these practices are generally associated with the rise (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41.  15
    Identity, Personhood and the Law: A Response to Ashcroft and McGee.Charles Foster & Jonathan Herring - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (1):73-74.
    We are very grateful to Richard Ashcroft1 and Andrew McGee2 for their thoughtful and articulate criticisms of our views.3 Ashcroft has disappointingly low aspirations for the law. Of course he is right to say that the law is not a ‘self-sufficient, integrated and self-interpreting system of doctrine’. The law is often philosophically incoherent and internally contradictory. But it does not follow from this that all areas of the law are philosophically unsatisfactory. And if that were true, the response should (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  40
    Part of Nature and Division in Margaret Cavendish’s Materialism.Jonathan L. Shaheen - 2019 - Synthese 196 (9):3551-3575.
    This paper pursues a question about the spatial relations between the three types of matter posited in Margaret Cavendish’s metaphysics. It examines the doctrine of complete blending and a distinctive argument against atomism, looking for grounds on which Cavendish can reject the existence of spatial regions composed of only one or two types of matter. It establishes, through that examination, that Cavendish operates with a causal conception of parts of nature and a dynamic notion of division. While the possibility (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  31
    Empress Vs. Spider-Man: Margaret Cavendish on Pure and Applied Mathematics.Alison Peterman - 2019 - Synthese 196 (9):3527-3549.
    The empress of Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World dismisses pure mathematicians as a waste of her time, and declares of the applied mathematicians that “there [is] neither Truth nor Justice in their Profession”. In Cavendish’s theoretical work, she defends the Empress’ judgments. In this paper, I discuss Cavendish’s arguments against pure and applied mathematics. In Sect. 3, I develop an interpretation of some relevant parts of Cavendish’s metaphysics and epistemology, focusing on her anti-abstractionism and what I call her ’assimilation’ (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings.Lorraine Code - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):156-173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45. Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca.Tina Chanter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  69
    Margaret Cavendish, Stoic Antecedent Causes, And Early Modern Occasional Causes.Eileen O'Neill - 2013 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 138 (3):311-326.
    Margaret Cavendish was an English natural philosopher. Influenced by Hobbes and by ancient Stoicism, she held that the created, natural world is purely material; there are no incorporeal substances that causally affect the world in the course of nature. However, she parts company with Hobbes and sides with the Stoics in rejecting a participate theory of matter. Instead, she holds that matter is a continuum. She rejects the mechanical philosophy's account of the essence of matter as simply extension. For (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Margaret Cavendish and Henry More.Sarah Hutton - 2003 - In Stephen Clucas (ed.), A Princely Brave Woman: Essays on Margaret Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle. Ashgate.
  48. Margaret Cavendish: Gender, Science and Politics.Lisa Walters - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    It is often thought that the numerous contradictory perspectives in Margaret Cavendish's writings demonstrate her inability to reconcile her feminism with her conservative, royalist politics. In this book Lisa Walters challenges this view and demonstrates that Cavendish's ideas more closely resemble republican thought, and that her methodology is the foundation for subversive political, scientific and gender theories. With an interdisciplinary focus Walters closely examines Cavendish's work and its context, providing the reader with an enriched understanding of women's contribution to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  70
    The Concept of Nudge and its Moral Significance: A Reply to Ashcroft, Bovens, Dworkin, Welch, and Wertheimer.Yashar Saghai - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):2012-101112.
    I warmly thank Richard Ashcroft, Luc Bovens, Gerald Dworkin, Brynn Welch, and Alan Wertheimer for their insightful comments on my article. As I do not have the space to discuss all the questions they raise, I will focus on four concerns that run through my commentators’ responses...
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  26
    The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish, by Deborah Boyle.Marcy P. Lascano - 2019 - Mind 128 (509):260-268.
    The Well-Ordered Universe: The Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish, by BoyleDeborah. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. x + 273.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999