Results for 'Cognitive affordance hypothesis'

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  1. The Problem of Mental Action.Thomas Metzinger - 2017 - Philosophy and Predicitive Processing.
    In mental action there is no motor output to be controlled and no sensory input vector that could be manipulated by bodily movement. It is therefore unclear whether this specific target phenomenon can be accommodated under the predictive processing framework at all, or if the concept of “active inference” can be adapted to this highly relevant explanatory domain. This contribution puts the phenomenon of mental action into explicit focus by introducing a set of novel conceptual instruments and developing a first (...)
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  2.  30
    Search and the Aging Mind: The Promise and Limits of the Cognitive Control Hypothesis of Age Differences in Search.Rui Mata & Bettina Helversen - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (3):416-427.
    Search is a prerequisite for successful performance in a broad range of tasks ranging from making decisions between consumer goods to memory retrieval. How does aging impact search processes in such disparate situations? Aging is associated with structural and neuromodulatory brain changes that underlie cognitive control processes, which in turn have been proposed as a domain-general mechanism controlling search in external environments as well as memory. We review the aging literature to evaluate the cognitive control hypothesis that (...)
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  3. The Dynamical Hypothesis in Cognitive Science.Tim van Gelder - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):615-28.
    The dynamical hypothesis is the claim that cognitive agents are dynamical systems. It stands opposed to the dominant computational hypothesis, the claim that cognitive agents are digital computers. This target article articulates the dynamical hypothesis and defends it as an open empirical alternative to the computational hypothesis. Carrying out these objectives requires extensive clarification of the conceptual terrain, with particular focus on the relation of dynamical systems to computers.
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  4.  29
    A Cognitive Neuroscience Hypothesis of Mood and Depression.Moshe Bar - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (11):456.
  5.  32
    The Cognitive Impenetrability Hypothesis: Doomsday for the Unity of the Cognitive Neurosciences?Birgitta Dresp - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):375-376.
    The heuristic value of Pylyshyn's cognitive impenetrability theory is questioned in this commentary, mainly because, as it stands, the key argument cannot be challenged empirically. Pylyshyn requires unambiguous evidence for an effect of cognitive states on early perceptual mechanisms, which is impossible to provide because we can only infer what might happen at these earlier levels of processing on the basis of evidence collected at the post-perceptual stage. Furthermore, the theory that early visual processes cannot be modified by (...)
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  6.  25
    “Scaffolding” and “Affordance” as Integrative Concepts in the Cognitive Sciences.Anna Estany & Sergio Martínez - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-14.
    There are (at least) two ways to think of the differences in basic concepts and typologies that one can find in the different scientific practices that constitute a research tradition. One is the fundamentalist view: the fewer the better. The other is a non-fundamentalist view of science whereby the integration of different concepts into the right abstraction grounds an explanation that is not grounded as the sum of the explanations supported by the parts. Integrative concepts are often associated with idealizations (...)
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  7.  20
    Resisting the Tyranny of Terminology: The General Dynamical Hypothesis in Cognitive Science.Terence Horgan & John Tienson - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):643-643.
    What van Gelder calls the dynamical hypothesis is only a special case of what we here dub the general dynamical hypothesis. His terminology makes it easy to overlook important alternative dynamical approaches in cognitive science. Connectionist models typically conform to the general dynamical hypothesis, but not to van Gelder's.
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    The Indirect Effect of Attention Bias on Memory Via Interpretation Bias: Evidence for the Combined Cognitive Bias Hypothesis in Subclinical Depression.Jonas Everaert, Marlies Tierens, Kasia Uzieblo & Ernst H. W. Koster - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1450-1459.
  9.  2
    Motivation for Aggressive Religious Radicalization: Goal Regulation Theory and a Personality × Threat × Affordance Hypothesis.Ian McGregor, Joseph Hayes & Mike Prentice - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  10.  57
    The Dynamical Hypothesis in Cognitive Science: A Review Essay of Mind As Motion[REVIEW]Robert M. French & Elizabeth Thomas - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (1):101-111.
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  11.  28
    Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis.Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan & Glenda Andrews - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236-242.
  12.  21
    Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis.Glenda Andrews Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236.
  13.  56
    Cognitive Neurobiology: A Computational Hypothesis for Laminar Cortex. [REVIEW]Paul M. Churchland - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (1):25-51.
    This paper outlines the functional capacities of a novel scheme for cognitive representation and computation, and it explores the possible implementation of this scheme in the massively parallel organization of the empirical brain. The suggestion is that the brain represents reality by means of positions in suitably constitutes phase spaces; and the brain performs computations on these representations by means of coordinate transformations from one phase space to another. This scheme may be implemented in the brain in two distinct (...)
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  14.  50
    Recursion Hypothesis Considered as a Research Program for Cognitive Science.Pauli Brattico - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (2):213-241.
    Humans grasp discrete infinities within several cognitive domains, such as in language, thought, social cognition and tool-making. It is sometimes suggested that any such generative ability is based on a computational system processing hierarchical and recursive mental representations. One view concerning such generativity has been that each of the mind’s modules defining a cognitive domain implements its own recursive computational system. In this paper recent evidence to the contrary is reviewed and it is proposed that there is only (...)
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  15.  27
    The Emotional Reactivity Hypothesis and Cognitive Evolution.Brian Hare & Michael Tomasello - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):464-465.
  16.  12
    Dynamical Systems Hypothesis in Cognitive Science.Robert F. Port - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
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    Hippocampal Function: Does the Working Memory Hypothesis Work? Should We Retire the Cognitive Map Theory?John O'Keefe - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):339-343.
  18.  2
    The Whorfian Hypothesis: A Cognitive Psychology Perspective.Earl Hunt & Franca Agnoli - 1991 - Psychological Review 98 (3):377-389.
  19.  1
    Limb Apraxia and the “Affordance Competition Hypothesis”.Elisabeth Rounis & Glyn Humphreys - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  20.  3
    Implications of Cognitive Load for Hypothesis Generation and Probability Judgment.Amber M. Sprenger, Michael R. Dougherty, Sharona M. Atkins, Ana M. Franco-Watkins, Rick P. Thomas, Nicholas Lange & Brandon Abbs - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  21.  3
    On Interpretation and Task Selection: The Sub-Component Hypothesis of Cognitive Noise Effects.Patrik Sã¶Rqvist - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  22. Cognitive Style, Cortical Stimulation, and the Conversion Hypothesis.David J. M. Kraemer, Roy H. Hamilton, Samuel B. Messing, Jennifer H. DeSantis & Sharon L. Thompson-Schill - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  23.  9
    The Mark of the Cognitive and the Coupling-Constitution Fallacy: A Defense of the Extended Mind Hypothesis.Giulia Piredda - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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    Cognitive Vulnerability, Depression, and the Moodstate Dependent Hypothesis: I Out of Sight Out of Mind?Jeanne Miranda & James J. Gross - 1997 - Cognition and Emotion 11 (5-6):585-605.
  25.  2
    The Sense Implication Hypothesis and Idealized Cognitive Models.Marcel Danesi - 2006 - Semiotica 2006 (161):185-198.
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  26.  2
    Neo-Piagetian Training Experiments Revisited: Is There Any Support for the Cognitive-Developmental Stage Hypothesis?Charles J. Brainerd - 1973 - Cognition 2 (3):349-370.
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  27.  6
    Response: No Need to Match: A Comment on Bach, Nicholson, and Hudson's “Affordance-Matching Hypothesis”.Patric Bach, Toby Nicholson & Matthew Hudson - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  28.  1
    The Dynamical Hypothesis in Cognitive Science: A Review Essay of Mind As Motion.Robert French & Elizabeth Thomas - 2004 - Minds and Machines 11 (1):101-111.
  29. Effects of Arousal on Cognitive Control: Empirical Tests of the Conflict-Modulated Hebbian-Learning Hypothesis.Stephen B. R. E. Brown, Henk van Steenbergen, Tomer Kedar & Sander Nieuwenhuis - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  30. The Hypothesis of Cognitive Capitalism, Paper Presented at 'Towards a Cosmopolitan Marxism'.C. Vercellone - forthcoming - Historical Materialism.
     
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  31. Innovative Scaffolding: Understanding Innovation as the Disclosure of Hidden Affordances.Eric Arnau & Andreu Ballús - 2013 - Revista Iberoamericana de Argumentación 7:1-11.
    Much attention has been drawn to the cognitive basis of innovation. While interesting in many ways, this poses the threat of falling back to traditional internalist assumptions with regard to cognition. We oppose the ensuing contrast between internal cognitive processing and external public practices and technologies that such internal cognitive systems might produce and utilize. We argue that innovation is best understood from the gibsonian notion of affordance, and that many innovative practices emerge from the external (...)
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  32.  43
    Loops, Constitution and Cognitive Extension.S. Orestis Palermos - 2014 - Cognitive Systems Research 27:25-41.
    The ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, the ‘cognitive bloat’ worry, and the persisting theoretical confusion about the fundamental difference between the hypotheses of embedded (HEMC) and extended (HEC) cognition are three interrelated worries, whose common point—and the problem they accentuate—is the lack of a principled criterion of constitution. Attempting to address the ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, mathematically oriented philosophers of mind have previously suggested that the presence of non-linear relations between the inner and the outer contributions is sufficient for cognitive extension. The abstract (...)
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  33. The Part of Cognitive Science That Is Philosophy.Daniel C. Dennett - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):231--236.
    There is much good work for philosophers to do in cognitive science if they adopt the constructive attitude that prevails in science, work toward testable hypotheses, and take on the task of clarifying the relationship between the scientific concepts and the everyday concepts with which we conduct our moral lives.
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  34.  93
    If the Motor System is No Mirror'.Maria Brincker - 2012 - In Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 158--182.
    Largely aided by the neurological discovery of so-called “ mirror neurons,” the attention to motor activity during action observation has exploded over the last two decades. The idea that we internally “ mirror ” the actions of others has led to a new strand of implicit simulation theories of action understanding[1][2]. The basic idea of this sort of simulation theory is that we, via an automatic covert activation of our own action representations, can understand the action and possibly the goal (...)
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  35.  28
    Drawing on a Sculpted Space of Actions: Educating for Expertise While Avoiding a Cognitive Monster.Machiel Keestra - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):620-639.
    Philosophers and scientists have across the ages been amazed about the fact that development and learning often lead to not just a merely incremental and gradual change in the learner but sometimes to a result that is strikingly different from the learner’s original situation: amazed, but at times also worried. Both philosophical and cognitive neuroscientific insights suggest that experts appear to perform ‘different’ tasks compared to beginners who behave in a similar way. These philosophical and empirical perspectives give some (...)
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  36.  97
    Computation and Cognition: Issues in the Foundation of Cognitive Science.Zenon W. Pylyshyn - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):111-32.
    The computational view of mind rests on certain intuitions regarding the fundamental similarity between computation and cognition. We examine some of these intuitions and suggest that they derive from the fact that computers and human organisms are both physical systems whose behavior is correctly described as being governed by rules acting on symbolic representations. Some of the implications of this view are discussed. It is suggested that a fundamental hypothesis of this approach is that there is a natural domain (...)
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  37. Perceiving and Desiring: A New Look at the Cognitive Penetrability of Experience.Dustin Stokes - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 158 (3):479-92.
    This paper considers an orectic penetration hypothesis which says that desires and desire-like states may influence perceptual experience in a non-externally mediated way. This hypothesis is clarified with a definition, which serves further to distinguish the interesting target phenomenon from trivial and non-genuine instances of desire-influenced perception. Orectic penetration is an interesting possible case of the cognitive penetrability of perceptual experience. The orectic penetration hypothesis is thus incompatible with the more common thesis that perception is cognitively (...)
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  38.  17
    The Cognitive‐Evolutionary Model of Surprise: A Review of the Evidence. [REVIEW]Rainer Reisenzein, Gernot Horstmann & Achim Schützwohl - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
    Research on surprise relevant to the cognitive-evolutionary model of surprise proposed by Meyer, Reisenzein, and Schützwohl is reviewed. The majority of the assumptions of the model are found empirically supported. Surprise is evoked by unexpected events and its intensity is determined by the degree if schema-discrepancy, whereas the novelty and the valence of the eliciting events probably do not have an independent effect. Unexpected events cause an automatic interruption of ongoing mental processes that is followed by an attentional shift (...)
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  39.  96
    Music and Language Perception: Expectations, Structural Integration, and Cognitive Sequencing.Barbara Tillmann - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):568-584.
    Music can be described as sequences of events that are structured in pitch and time. Studying music processing provides insight into how complex event sequences are learned, perceived, and represented by the brain. Given the temporal nature of sound, expectations, structural integration, and cognitive sequencing are central in music perception (i.e., which sounds are most likely to come next and at what moment should they occur?). This paper focuses on similarities in music and language cognition research, showing that music (...)
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  40.  77
    Extending the Notion of Affordance.Silvano Zipoli Caiani - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):275-293.
    Post-Gibson attempts to set out a definition of affordance generally agree that this notion can be understood as a property of the environment with salience for an organism’s behavior. According to this view, some scholars advocate the idea that affordances are dispositional properties of physical objects that, given suitable circumstances, necessarily actualize related actions. This paper aims at assessing this statement in light of a theory of affordance perception. After years of discontinuity between strands of empirical and theoretical (...)
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  41.  4
    A Cognitive Model of Dynamic Cooperation With Varied Interdependency Information.Cleotilde Gonzalez, Noam Ben‐Asher, Jolie M. Martin & Varun Dutt - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (3):457-495.
    We analyze the dynamics of repeated interaction of two players in the Prisoner's Dilemma under various levels of interdependency information and propose an instance-based learning cognitive model to explain how cooperation emerges over time. Six hypotheses are tested regarding how a player accounts for an opponent's outcomes: the selfish hypothesis suggests ignoring information about the opponent and utilizing only the player's own outcomes; the extreme fairness hypothesis weighs the player's own and the opponent's outcomes equally; the moderate (...)
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  42.  92
    Uncertainty Reduction as a Measure of Cognitive Load in Sentence Comprehension.Stefan L. Frank - 2013 - Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):475-494.
    The entropy-reduction hypothesis claims that the cognitive processing difficulty on a word in sentence context is determined by the word's effect on the uncertainty about the sentence. Here, this hypothesis is tested more thoroughly than has been done before, using a recurrent neural network for estimating entropy and self-paced reading for obtaining measures of cognitive processing load. Results show a positive relation between reading time on a word and the reduction in entropy due to processing that (...)
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  43. Intrinsic Cognitive Models.Jonathan A. Waskan - 2003 - Cognitive Science 27 (2):259-283.
    Theories concerning the structure, or format, of mental representation should (1) be formulated in mechanistic, rather than metaphorical terms; (2) do justice to several philosophical intuitions about mental representation; and (3) explain the human capacity to predict the consequences of worldly alterations (i.e., to think before we act). The hypothesis that thinking involves the application of syntax-sensitive inference rules to syntactically structured mental representations has been said to satisfy all three conditions. An alternative hypothesis is that thinking requires (...)
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  44.  53
    The Perception‐Action Model: Counting Computational Mechanisms.Thor Grünbaum - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (4):416-445.
    Milner and Goodale's Two Visual Systems Hypothesis is regarded as common ground in recent discussions of visual consciousness. A central part of TVSH is a functional model of vision and action. In this paper, I provide a brief overview of these current discussions and argue that there is ambiguity between a strong and a weak version of PAM. I argue that, given a standard way of individuating computational mechanisms, the available evidence cannot be used to distinguish between these versions. (...)
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  45.  3
    Cognitive Metaphor Theory and the Metaphysics of Immediacy.Mathias W. Madsen - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (4):881-908.
    One of the core tenets of cognitive metaphor theory is the claim that metaphors ground abstract knowledge in concrete, first-hand experience. In this paper, I argue that this grounding hypothesis contains some problematic conceptual ambiguities and, under many reasonable interpretations, empirical difficulties. I present evidence that there are foundational obstacles to defining a coherent and cognitively valid concept of “metaphor” and “concrete meaning,” and some general problems with singling out certain domains of experience as more immediate than others. (...)
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  46.  35
    Analytic Cognitive Style Predicts Religious and Paranormal Belief.Gordon Pennycook, James Allan Cheyne, Paul Seli, Derek J. Koehler & Jonathan A. Fugelsang - 2012 - Cognition 123 (3):335-346.
    An analytic cognitive style denotes a propensity to set aside highly salient intuitions when engaging in problem solving. We assess the hypothesis that an analytic cognitive style is associated with a history of questioning, altering, and rejecting supernatural claims, both religious and paranormal. In two studies, we examined associations of God beliefs, religious engagement, conventional religious beliefs and paranormal beliefs with performance measures of cognitive ability and analytic cognitive style. An analytic cognitive style negatively (...)
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  47.  22
    Contemplation and Hypotheses in Literature.Jukka Mikkonen - 2010 - Philosophical Frontiers 5 (1):73-83.
    In literary aesthetics, the debate on whether literary fictions provide propositional knowledge generally centres around the question whether there are authors’ explicit or implicit truth-claims in literary works and whether the reader’s act of looking for and assessing such claims as true or false is an appropriate stance toward the works as literary works. Nevertheless, in reading literary fiction, readers cannot always be sure whether the author is actually asserting or suggesting a view she expresses or presents because of the (...)
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  48. The Cognitive Functions of Language.Peter Carruthers - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):657-674.
    This paper explores a variety of different versions of the thesis that natural language is involved in human thinking. It distinguishes amongst strong and weak forms of this thesis, dismissing some as implausibly strong and others as uninterestingly weak. Strong forms dismissed include the view that language is conceptually necessary for thought (endorsed by many philosophers) and the view that language is _de facto_ the medium of all human conceptual thinking (endorsed by many philosophers and social scientists). Weak forms include (...)
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  49. The Cognitive Penetrability of Perception: New Philosophical Perspectives.Zeimbekis John & Raftopoulos Athanassios (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    According to the cognitive penetrability hypothesis, our beliefs, desires, and possibly our emotions literally affect how we see the world. This book elucidates the nature of the cognitive penetrability and impenetrability hypotheses, assesses their plausibility, and explores their philosophical consequences. It connects the topic's multiple strands (the psychological findings, computationalist background, epistemological consequences of cognitive architecture, and recent philosophical developments) at a time when the outcome of many philosophical debates depends on knowing whether and how (...) states can influence perception. All sixteen chapters were written especially for the book. The first chapters provide methodological and conceptual clarification of the topic and give an account of the relations between penetrability, encapsulation, modularity, and cross-modal interactions in perception. Assessments of psychological and neuroscientific evidence for cognitive penetration are given by several chapters. Most of the contributions analyse the impact of cognitive penetrability and impenetrability on specific philosophical topics: high-level perceptual contents, the epistemological consequences of penetration, nonconceptual content, the phenomenology of late perception, metacognitive feelings, and action. The book includes a comprehensive introduction which explains the history of the debate, its key technical concepts (informational encapsulation, early and late vision, the perception-cognition distinction, hard-wired perceptual processing, perceptual learning, theory-ladenness), and the debate's relevance to current topics in the philosophy of mind and perception, epistemology, and philosophy of psychology. (shrink)
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  50. Cognitive Penetration and the Perception of Art (Winner of 2012 Dialectica Essay Prize).Dustin Stokes - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (1):1-34.
    There are good, even if inconclusive, reasons to think that cognitive penetration of perception occurs: that cognitive states like belief causally affect, in a relatively direct way, the contents of perceptual experience. The supposed importance of – indeed as it is suggested here, what is definitive of – this possible phenomenon is that it would result in important epistemic and scientific consequences. One interesting and intuitive consequence entirely unremarked in the extant literature concerns the perception of art. Intuition (...)
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