Results for 'Lord Brain'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Electroencephalography Measures of Neural Connectivity in the Assessment of Brain Responses to Salient Auditory Stimuli in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Victoria Lord & Jolanta Opacka-Juffry - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  52
    Reply to Professor Smythies.Lord Brain - 1962 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (50):165-167.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  39
    Diagnosis of Genius.Lord Brain - 1963 - British Journal of Aesthetics 3 (2):114-128.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  85
    On Space and Sense-Data: A Reply to Lord Brain.J. R. Smythies - 1962 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (August):161-164.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. A Reply to Lord Brain.J. R. Smythies - 1962 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13:161.
  6. Subtle is the Lord: The Relationship Between Consciousness, the Unconscious, and the Executive Control Network (ECN) of the Brain.Fred M. Levin & Colwyn Trevarthen - 2000 - Annual of Psychoanalysis 28:105-125.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Daniel Lord Smail.On Deep History and the Brain. Xiv + 271 Pp., Bibl., Index. Berkeley/Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2007. $21.95. [REVIEW]David Sepkoski - 2008 - Isis 99 (4):820-821.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  15
    D. M. Gross, The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotles Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2006, X+194 Pp. ISBN-13: 978-0-226-30980-4, Paperback ($ 22). [REVIEW]Timo Airaksinen - 2012 - Hobbes Studies 25 (2):233-235.
    This paper discusses sovereignty and examines in detail Hobbes's debates with the two leading legal theorists of his day, Coke and Hale, both Lord Chief Justices of the King's Bench. I argue that Hobbes came to change his mind somewhat about the desirability of divided sovereignty by the time, near the end of his life, that he wrote the Dialogue . But I also argue that Hobbes should have developed more than a very thin conception of the rule of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. The Rich Club of the Brain in Bipolar Disorder.Lord Anton, Roberts Gloria, Breakspear Michael & Mitchell Phillip - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  10. Explaining the Brain: Mechanisms and the Mosaic Unity of Neuroscience.F. Craver Carl - 2007 - Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press.
    Carl Craver investigates what we are doing when we sue neuroscience to explain what's going on in the brain.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   183 citations  
  11.  85
    Neural Reuse: A Fundamental Organizational Principle of the Brain.Michael L. Anderson - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):245.
    An emerging class of theories concerning the functional structure of the brain takes the reuse of neural circuitry for various cognitive purposes to be a central organizational principle. According to these theories, it is quite common for neural circuits established for one purpose to be exapted (exploited, recycled, redeployed) during evolution or normal development, and be put to different uses, often without losing their original functions. Neural reuse theories thus differ from the usual understanding of the role of neural (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   54 citations  
  12. Neurophilosophy: Toward A Unified Science of the Mind-Brain.Patricia S. Churchland - 1986 - MIT Press.
    This is a unique book. It is excellently written, crammed with information, wise and a pleasure to read.' ---Daniel C. Dennett, Tufts University.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   423 citations  
  13. Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain.Antonio R. Damasio - 1994 - Putnam.
  14. The Self and Its Brain: An Argument for Interactionism.Karl R. Popper & John C. Eccles - 1977 - Springer.
    Physical and chemical processes may act upon the mind; and when we are writing a difficult letter, our mind acts upon our body and, through a chain of physical...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   475 citations  
  15.  58
    The Case for Mental Duality: Evidence From Split-Brain Data and Other Considerations.Roland Puccetti - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):93-123.
    Contrary to received opinion among philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists, conscious duality as a principle of brain organization is neither incoherent nor demonstrably false. The present paper begins by reviewing the history of the theory and its anatomical basis and defending it against the claim that it rests upon an arbitrary decision as to what constitutes the biological substratum of mind or person.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   102 citations  
  16. Decomposing the Brain: A Long Term Pursuit. [REVIEW]William P. Bechtel - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):229-242.
    This paper defends cognitive neuroscience’s project of developing mechanistic explan- ations of cognitive processes through decomposition and localization against objections raised by William Uttal in The New Phrenology. The key issue between Uttal and researchers pursuing cognitive neuroscience is that Uttal bets against the possibility of decomposing mental operations into component elementary operations which are localized in distinct brain regions. The paper argues that it is through advancing and revising what are likely to be overly simplistic and incorrect decompositions (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  17. Developmental Structure in Brain Evolution.Barbara L. Finlay, Richard B. Darlington & Nicholas Nicastro - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):263-278.
    How does evolution grow bigger brains? It has been widely assumed that growth of individual structures and functional systems in response to niche-specific cognitive challenges is the most plausible mechanism for brain expansion in mammals. Comparison of multiple regressions on allometric data for 131 mammalian species, however, suggests that for 9 of 11 brain structures taxonomic and body size factors are less important than covariance of these major structures with each other. Which structure grows biggest is largely predicted (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  18. Survival with an Asymmetrical Brain: Advantages and Disadvantages of Cerebral Lateralization.Giorgio Vallortigara & Lesley J. Rogers - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):575-589.
    Recent evidence in natural and semi-natural settings has revealed a variety of left-right perceptual asymmetries among vertebrates. These include preferential use of the left or right visual hemifield during activities such as searching for food, agonistic responses, or escape from predators in animals as different as fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. There are obvious disadvantages in showing such directional asymmetries because relevant stimuli may be located to the animal's left or right at random; there is no a priori association (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19.  9
    Language, Tools and Brain: The Ontogeny and Phylogeny of Hierarchically Organized Sequential Behavior.Patricia M. Greenfield - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):531-551.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   145 citations  
  20.  31
    Précis of the Brain and Emotion.Edmund T. Rolls - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):177-191.
    The topics treated in The brain and emotion include the definition, nature, and functions of emotion (Ch. 3); the neural bases of emotion (Ch. 4); reward, punishment, and emotion in brain design (Ch. 10); a theory of consciousness and its application to understanding emotion and pleasure (Ch. 9); and neural networks and emotion-related learning (Appendix). The approach is that emotions can be considered as states elicited by reinforcers (rewards and punishers). This approach helps with understanding the functions of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  21.  37
    An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain.Jonathan Kenneth Burns - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social brain, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  22. The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why?Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.
    Recent imaging results suggest that individuals automatically share the emotions of others when exposed to their emotions. We question the assumption of the automaticity and propose a contextual approach, suggesting several modulatory factors that might influence empathic brain responses. Contextual appraisal could occur early in emotional cue evaluation, which then might or might not lead to an empathic brain response, or not until after an empathic brain response is automatically elicited. We propose two major roles for empathy; (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   52 citations  
  23.  24
    Sex Differences in Human Brain Asymmetry: A Critical Survey.Jeannette McGlone - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):215.
  24. Operational Architectonics of the Human Brain Biopotential Field: Toward Solving the Mind-Brain Problem. [REVIEW]Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (3):261-296.
    The understanding of the interrelationship between brain and mind remains far from clear. It is well established that the brain's capacity to integrate information from numerous sources forms the basis for cognitive abilities. However, the core unresolved question is how information about the "objective" physical entities of the external world can be integrated, and how unifiedand coherent mental states (or Gestalts) can be established in the internal entities of distributed neuronal systems. The present paper offers a unified methodological (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25.  40
    Why the Brain Knows More Than We Do.Birgitta Dresp-Langley - 2011 - Brain Sciences 2:1-21.
    Scientific studies have shown that non-conscious stimuli and représentations influence information processing during conscious experience. In the light of such evidence, questions about potential functional links between non-conscious brain representations and conscious experience arise. This article discusses models capable of explaining how statistical learning mechanisms in dedicated resonant circuits could generate specific temporal activity traces of non-conscious representations in the brain. How reentrant signaling, top-down matching, and statistical coincidence of such activity traces may lead to the progressive consolidation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  34
    Binocular Rivalry Between Complex Stimuli in Split-Brain Observers.Robert P. O'Shea & Paul M. Corballis - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (1):151-160.
    We investigated binocular rivalry in the twocerebral hemispheres of callosotomized(split-brain) observers. We found that rivalryoccurs for complex stimuli in split-brainobservers, and that it is similar in the twohemispheres. This poses difficulties for twotheories of rivalry: (1) that rivalry occursbecause of switching of activity between thetwo hemispheres, and (2) that rivalry iscontrolled by a structure in the rightfrontoparietal cortex. Instead, similar rivalryfrom the two hemispheres is consistent with atheory that its mechanism is low in the visualsystem, at which each hemisphere (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  67
    The Two Factor Theory of the Mind-Brain Relation.Ullin T. Place - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):29-43.
    The analysis of mental concepts suggests that the distinctionbetween the mental and the nonmental is not ontologically fundamental,and that, whereas mental processes are one and the same things as thebrain processes with which they are correlated, dispositional mentalstates depend causally on and are, thus, ''''distinct existences'''' fromthe states of the brain microstructure with which ''they'' are correlated.It is argued that this difference in the relation between an entity andits composition/underlying structure applies across the board. allstuffs and processes are the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  69
    Current Debate on the Ethical Issues of Brain Death.Masahiro Morioka - 2004 - Proceedings of International Congress on Ethical Issues in Brain Death and Organ Transplantation:57-59.
    The philosophy of our proposal are as follows: (1) Various ideas of life and death, including that of objecting to brain death as human death, should be guaranteed. We would like to maintain the idea of pluralism of human death; and (2) We should respect a child’s view of life and death. We should provide him/her with an opportunity to think and express their own ideas about life and death.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  67
    "Brain-Paradox" and "Embeddment": Do We Need a "Philosophy of the Brain"?Georg Northoff - 2001 - Brain and Mind 195 (2):195-211.
    Present discussions in philosophy of mind focuson ontological and epistemic characteristics ofmind and on mind-brain relations. In contrast,ontological and epistemic characteristics ofthe brain have rarely been thematized. Rather,philosophy seems to rely upon an implicitdefinition of the brain as "neuronal object''and "object of recognition'': henceontologically and epistemically distinct fromthe mind, characterized as "mental subject'' and"subject of recognition''. This leads to the"brain-paradox''. This ontological and epistemicdissociation between brain and mind can beconsidered central for the problems of mind (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  32
    The Moral Brain.David Loye - 2002 - Brain and Mind 3 (1):133-150.
    This article probes the evolutionary origins ofmoral capacities and moral agency. From thisit develops a theory of the guidancesystem of higher mind (GSHM). The GSHM is ageneral model of intelligence whereby moralfunctioning is integrated with cognitive,affective, and conative functioning, resultingin a flow of information between eight brainlevels functioning as an evaluative unitbetween stimulus and response.The foundation of this view of morality and ofcaring behavior is Charles Darwin's theory,largely ignored until recently, of thegrounding of morality in sexual instincts whichlater expand into (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  29
    On the 'Dynamic Brain' Metaphor.Péter Érdi - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (1):119-145.
    Dynamic systems theory offers conceptual andmathematical tools for describing the performance ofneural systems at very different levels oforganization. Three aspects of the dynamic paradigmare discussed, namely neural rhythms, neural andmental development, and macroscopic brain theories andmodels.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  7
    Mind-Brain Puzzle Versus Mind-Physical World Identity.David A. Booth - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):348-349.
    To maintain my neutral monist or multi-aspect view of human reality (or indeed to defend the Cartesian dualism assumed by Puccetti & Dykes, it is wrong to relate the mind to the brain alone. A person's mind should be related to the physical environment, including the body, in addition to the brain. Furthermore, we are unlikely to understand the detailed functioning of an individual brain without knowing the history of its interactions with the external and internal environments (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  9
    Some Practical and Theoretical Issues Concerning Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts as Therapy for Brain Dysfunctions.Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):36-45.
    Grafts of embryonic neural tissue into the brains of adult patients are currently being used to treat Parkinson's disease and are under serious consideration as therapy for a variety of other degenerative and traumatic disorders. This target article evaluates the use of transplants to promote recovery from brain injury and highlights the kinds of questions and problems that must be addressed before this form of therapy is routinely applied. It has been argued that neural transplantation can promote functional recovery (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  20
    Brain-Paradox” and “Embeddment” – Do We Need a “Philosophy of the Brain”?G. Northoff - 2001 - Brain and Mind 2 (2):195-211.
    Present discussions in philosophy of mind focuson ontological and epistemic characteristics ofmind and on mind-brain relations. In contrast,ontological and epistemic characteristics ofthe brain have rarely been thematized. Rather,philosophy seems to rely upon an implicitdefinition of the brain as "neuronal object''and "object of recognition'': henceontologically and epistemically distinct fromthe mind, characterized as "mental subject'' and"subject of recognition''. This leads to the"brain-paradox''. This ontological and epistemicdissociation between brain and mind can beconsidered central for the problems of mind (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  9
    Neuropsychological Inference with an Interactive Brain: A Critique of the “Locality” Assumption.Martha J. Farah - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):43.
  36. Brain-Wise: Studies in Neurophilosophy.Patricia S. Churchland - 2002 - MIT Press.
    A neurophilosopher?s take on the self, free will, human understanding, and the experience of God, from the perspective of the brain.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  37. Can the Self Be a Brain?Alan Schwerin - 2015 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 19 (2): 235 - 246.
    Philosophical materialists suggest that a person can be identified with their brain. My paper is a critical investigation of this provocative thesis and an analysis of some of the prominent arguments to support this view. My overall argument is that there is more to this issue than some philosophers appear to acknowledge.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Dreaming and the Brain: Toward a Cognitive Neuroscience of Conscious States.J. Allan Hobson, Edward F. Pace-Schott & Robert Stickgold - 2003 - In Edward F. Pace-Schott, Mark Solms, Mark Blagrove & Stevan Harnad (eds.), Sleep and Dreaming: Scientific Advances and Reconsiderations. Cambridge University Press. pp. 793-842.
    Sleep researchers in different disciplines disagree about how fully dreaming can be explained in terms of brain physiology. Debate has focused on whether REM sleep dreaming is qualitatively different from nonREM (NREM) sleep and waking. A review of psychophysiological studies shows clear quantitative differences between REM and NREM mentation and between REM and waking mentation. Recent neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies also differentiate REM, NREM, and waking in features with phenomenological implications. Both evidence and theory suggest that there are isomorphisms (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   43 citations  
  39. Time and the Observer: The Where and When of Consciousness in the Brain.Daniel C. Dennett & Marcel Kinsbourne - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):183-201.
    _Behavioral and Brain Sciences_ , 15, 183-247, 1992. Reprinted in _The Philosopher's Annual_ , Grim, Mar and Williams, eds., vol. XV-1992, 1994, pp. 23-68; Noel Sheehy and Tony Chapman, eds., _Cognitive Science_ , Vol. I, Elgar, 1995, pp.210-274.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   200 citations  
  40.  60
    Consciousness, Brain, and the Physical World.Max Velmans - 1990 - Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):77-99.
    Dualist and Reductionist theories of mind disagree about whether or not consciousness can be reduced to a state of or function of the brain. They assume, however, that the contents of consciousness are separate from the external physical world as-perceived. According to the present paper this assumption has no foundation either in everyday experience or in science. Drawing on evidence for perceptual projection in both interoceptive and exteroceptive sense modalities, the case is made that the physical world as-perceived is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   87 citations  
  41.  57
    Did My Brain Implant Make Me Do It? Questions Raised by DBS Regarding Psychological Continuity, Responsibility for Action and Mental Competence.Laura Klaming & Pim Haselager - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):527-539.
    Deep brain stimulation is a well-accepted treatment for movement disorders and is currently explored as a treatment option for various neurological and psychiatric disorders. Several case studies suggest that DBS may, in some patients, influence mental states critical to personality to such an extent that it affects an individual’s personal identity, i.e. the experience of psychological continuity, of persisting through time as the same person. Without questioning the usefulness of DBS as a treatment option for various serious and treatment (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  42. Escape From the Cartesian Theater. Reply to Commentaries on Time and the Observer: The Where and When of Consciousness in the Brain.Daniel C. Dennett & Marcel Kinsbourne - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15:183-247.
    Damasio remarks, it "informs virtually all research on mind and brain, explicitly or implicitly." Indeed, serial information processing models generally run this risk (Kinsbourne, 1985). The commentaries provide a wealth of confirming instances of the seductive power of this idea. Our sternest critics Block, Farah, Libet, and Treisman) adopt fairly standard Cartesian positions; more interesting are those commentators who take themselves to be mainly in agreement with us, but who express reservations or offer support with arguments that betray a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   213 citations  
  43.  53
    Self-Projection and the Brain.R. L. Buckner & D. C. Carroll - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):49-57.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   104 citations  
  44.  82
    Me, Myself and My Brain Implant: Deep Brain Stimulation Raises Questions of Personal Authenticity and Alienation.Felicitas Kraemer - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (3):483-497.
    In this article, I explore select case studies of Parkinson patients treated with deep brain stimulation in light of the notions of alienation and authenticity. While the literature on DBS has so far neglected the issues of authenticity and alienation, I argue that interpreting these cases in terms of these concepts raises new issues for not only the philosophical discussion of neuro-ethics of DBS, but also for the psychological and medical approach to patients under DBS. In particular, I suggest (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  45.  95
    Evolution of the Brain: Creation of the Self.John C. Eccles - 1990 - New York: Routledge.
    Sir John Eccles, a distinguished scientist and Nobel Prize winner who has devoted his scientific life to the study of the mammalian brain, tells the story of...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   45 citations  
  46.  22
    The Computer And The Brain.John von Neumann - 1958 - New Haven: Yale University Press.
    This book represents the views of one of the greatest mathematicians of the twentieth century on the analogies between computing machines and the living human brain.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   93 citations  
  47.  23
    Brain Evolution in Homo: The “Radiator” Theory.Dean Falk - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):333-344.
  48. Introspection and Cognitive Brain Mapping: From Stimulus-Response to Script-Report.Anthony I. Jack & Andreas Roepstorff - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (8):333-339.
    Cognitive science has wholeheartedly embraced functional brain imaging, but introspective data are still eschewed to the extent that it runs against standard practice to engage in the systematic collection of introspective reports. However, in the case of executive processes associated with prefrontal cortex, imaging has made limited progress, whereas introspective methods have considerable unfulfilled potential. We argue for a re-evaluation of the standard ‘cognitive mapping’ paradigm, emphasizing the use of retrospective reports alongside behavioural and brain imaging techniques. Using (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  49. Brain, Conscious Experience, and the Observing Self.Bernard J. Baars, Thomas Zoega Ramsoy & Steven Laureys - 2003 - Trends in Neurosciences 26 (12):671-5.
    Conscious perception, like the sight of a coffee cup, seems to involve the brain identifying a stimulus. But conscious input activates more brain regions than are needed to identify coffee cups and faces. It spreads beyond sensory cortex to frontoparietal association areas, which do not serve stimulus identification as such. What is the role of those regions? Parietal cortex support the ‘first person perspective’ on the visual world, unconsciously framing the visual object stream. Some prefrontal areas select and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  50.  33
    The Brain Basis of Emotion: A Meta-Analytic Review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   39 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000