Related categories

246 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 246
  1. added 2020-03-21
    Waltonian Perceptualism.Madeleine Ransom - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (1):66-70.
    Kendall Walton’s project in ‘Categories of Art’ (1970) is to answer two questions. First, does the history of an artwork’s production determine its aesthetic properties? Second, how – if at all – should knowledge of the history of a work’s production influence our aesthetic judgments of its properties? While his answer to the first has been clearly understood, his answer to the second less so. Contrary to how many have interpreted Walton, such knowledge is not necessary for making aesthetic judgments; (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2020-03-19
    Aesthetics: A Very Short Introduction.Bence Nanay - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Bence Nanay introduces aesthetics, a branch of philosophy that explores the nature of art, beauty, and taste. Looking beyond traditional artistic experiences, he defends the topic from accusations of elitism, and shows how more everyday experiences such as the pleasure in a soft fabric or falling leaves can become the subject of aesthetics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2020-03-17
    Aesthetic Experience of Beautiful and Ugly Persons: A Critique.Mika Suojanen - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8 (1).
    The question of whether or not beauty exists in nature is a philosophical problem. In particular, there is the question of whether artworks, persons, or nature has aesthetic qualities. Most people say that they care about their own beauty. Moreover, they judge another person's appearance from an aesthetic point of view using aesthetic concepts. However, aesthetic judgements are not objective in the sense that the experience justifies their objectivity. By analysing Monroe C. Beardsley's theory of the objectivity of aesthetic qualities, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2020-03-15
    The Aesthetic Experience of Artwork.Mika Suojanen - 2014 - In Kaisa Koivisto, Jani Kukkola, Timo Latomaa & Pirkko Sandelin (eds.), Experience Research IV. Rovaniemi: Lapland University Press. pp. 57–72.
    What is beautiful or ugly vary from one person another, from time to time and from culture to culture. However, at the same time, people are certain that there are aesthetic properties in the nature, artworks and other persons and, furthermore, they can be perceived by the naked eye. This article argues that experience does not reveal the aesthetic properties of the objects.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2020-03-04
    Van Eyck: An Optical Revolution.Bence Nanay - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (2):223-225.
    Van Eyck: An Optical RevolutionMuseum of Fine Arts, Ghent, Belgium, 1 February–30 April 2020.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2020-01-21
    Danto on Perception.Sam Rose & Bence Nanay - forthcoming - In Jonathan Gilmore & Lydia Goehr (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Arthur Danto. Oxford: Blackwell.
    Jerry Fodor wrote the following assessment of Danto’s importance in 1993: “Danto has done something I’ve been very much wanting to do: namely, reconsider some hard problems in aesthetics in the light of the past 20 years or so of philosophical work on intentionality and representation” (Fodor 1993, p. 41). Fodor is absolutely right: some of Danto’s work could be thought of as the application of some influential ideas about perception that Fodor also shared. The problem is that these ideas (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2020-01-19
    Using Philosophy of Perception in Aesthetics.Bence Nanay - 2015 - Aesthetic Investigations 1:174-180.
    Aesthetics is about ways of experiencing the world. But then if we apply the remarkably elaborate and sophisticated conceptual apparatus of philosophy of perception to questions in aesthetics, we can make real progress.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2020-01-18
    Responses to Critics.Bence Nanay - 2019 - Estetika 56:118-124.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2020-01-18
    Precis of Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception.Bence Nanay - 2019 - Studi di Estetica 47:217-221.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2020-01-18
    Responses to Critics.Bence Nanay - 2019 - Studi di Estetica 47:239-244.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. added 2020-01-18
    Precis of Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception.Bence Nanay - 2019 - Estetika 56:91-94.
    Precis of Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2020-01-18
    Defamiliarization and the Unprompted (Not Innocent) Eye.Bence Nanay - 2018 - Nonsite 24:1-17.
    A distinctive feature of Russian formalism, something we do not see in Bell and Fry or in Wölfflin and Riegl (or see it more rarely, see Section IV below), is this emphasis on the analysis of everyday perception and the ways in which art encourages us to perceive differently. But it is difficult not to read the concept of defamiliarization as a naïve early statement of what art historians and aestheticians of the second half of the 20th century criticized as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2020-01-15
    Perceptual Skills.Dustin Stokes & Bence Nanay - forthcoming - In Ellen Fridland & Carlotta Pavese (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Skill and Expertise. London: Routledge.
    This chapter has four parts. I distinguishes some types of perceptual skills and highlights their importance in everyday perception. II identifies a well-studied class of perceptual skills: cases of perceptual expertise. III discusses a less studied possible instance of perceptual skill: picture perception. Finally, IV outlines some important mechanisms underlying perceptual skills, with special emphasis on attention and mental imagery.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. added 2019-08-20
    Atmosphere.Friedlind Riedel - 2019 - In Jan Slaby & ‎Christian von Scheve (eds.), Affective Societies: Key Concepts. New York: Routledge. pp. 85-95.
    This chapter traces the genealogy of the term atmosphere in the German language, identifies historical semantic shifts, and points to its grammatical specifics. The state of research on atmospheres is briefly summarized and an overview is offered of the various definitions of the term in different disciplines. Drawing on Timothy Morton’s theory of ambient poetics, and on Hermann Schmitz’s “new phenomenology,” four key characteristics of atmospheres are discussed and elaborated: their mereological constitution, their modal structure, their intensification at affective thresholds, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2019-08-20
    Atmosphere as a Concept for Ethnomusicology: Comparing the Gamelatron and Gamelan.Andrew McGraw - 2016 - Ethnomusicology 60 (1):125-147.
    Abstract. In this article I compare a robotic gamelan sound installation (the gamelatron) and traditional gamelan, as performed in the American gamelan subculture, in order to specify the concept of atmosphere for use within ethnomusicology. I argue that at the level of affect the gamelatron and gamelan afford similar experiences that I call “atmospheres of felt- relation.” At the level of comprehension they are registered as divergent because of their differential alignment to several discursive binaries: live/recorded, human/machine, individual/group, subject/object and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16. added 2019-08-17
    Sensory Force, Sublime Impact, and Beautiful Form.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):449-464.
    Can a basic sensory property like a bare colour or tone be beautiful? Some, like Kant, say no. But Heidegger suggests, plausibly, that colours ‘glow’ and tones ‘sing’ in artworks. These claims can be productively synthesized: ‘glowing’ colours are not beautiful; but they are sensory forces—not mere ‘matter’, contra Kant—with real aesthetic impact. To the extent that it inheres in sensible properties, beauty is plausibly restricted to structures of sensory force. Kant correspondingly misrepresents the relation of beautiful wholes to their (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2019-08-13
    Electromecánicas IV - Despliegue y activación de un espacio-tiempo barroco.Renzo Christian Filinich Orozco & Monica Salinero Rates - 2018 - Enclave Sonora Espacio, Editorial Sonec.
    En Electromecánicas IV, – Despliegue y activación de un espacio-tiempo barroco, Mónica Salinero socióloga y Renzo Filinich artista, se sumergen en el trabajo de análisis de la obra de Raúl Díaz, “Electromecánicas IV, poniendo en valor la diferencia conceptual y la diversidad del universo latinoamericano como espacio de creación situado. Inspirados en las teorías de Bolivar Echevarria, discuten la complejidad simbólica que rodea a esta experiencia estética, deteniéndose en los valores y funciones que se encuentran dentro del espectro cultural andino (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2019-07-22
    On Liking Aesthetic Value.Keren Gorodeisky - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    According to tradition, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to a certain feeling of liking or pleasure. Is that true? Two answers are on offer in the field of aesthetics today: 1. The Hedonist answers: Yes, aesthetic value is non-contingently connected to pleasure insofar as this value is constituted and explained by the power of its possessors to please (under standard conditions). 2. The Non-Affectivist answers: No. At best, pleasure is contingently related to aesthetic value. The aim of this paper is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. added 2019-07-22
    The Authority of Pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2019 - Noûs 53 (4):1-22.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. added 2019-07-17
    Shared Musical Experiences.Brandon Polite - 2019 - British Journal of Aesthetics 59 (4):429-447.
    In ‘Listening to Music Together’, Nick Zangwill offers three arguments which aim to establish that listening to music can never be a joint activity. If any of these arguments were sound, then our experiences of music, qua object of aesthetic attention, would be essentially private. In this paper, I argue that Zangwill’s arguments are unsound and I develop an account of shared musical experience that defends three main conclusions. First, joint listening is not merely possible but a common feature of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. added 2019-07-17
    On "Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception".Nicholas Silins - 2019 - Studi di Estetica:227-233.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. added 2019-07-07
    In the Eye of the Beholder.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2016 - In Julian Dodd (ed.), Art, Mind, and Narrative: Themes from the Work of Peter Goldie. Oxford: pp. 223-340.
    According to a core tenet of contemporary philosophy, aesthetic properties are primarily represented in experiences. Obviously, however, the tenet does not apply in any straightforward manner to many items that nevertheless seem to have aesthetic properties. Examples include literary works, mathematical objects, scientific ideas, and works of conceptual art. Aesthetic properties need not be represented in perceptual experiences, but what is an experience if not a perceptual state? This paper adapts Fred Dretske’s distinction between analogue and digital representation to develop (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. added 2019-07-07
    Perception and Art.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2015 - In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford: pp. 871-884.
    Pictures are valuable partly because they engage perception in distinctive ways. This chapter surveys recent accounts of depiction, of the distinctive content and phenomenology of our experiences of images, and of the artistic or aesthetic value that these experiences afford. Particular attention is paid to recent research on the relationship between seeing a flat image surface and having an experience as of the scene it represents.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2019-06-06
    The Perception of Music: Comments on Peacocke: Articles.Paul Boghossian - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):71-76.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. added 2019-06-06
    Aesthetic Perception: A Thomistic Perspective. By Kevin E. O'Reilly: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (4):726-727.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. added 2019-06-06
    Response to Christopher Peacocke's ‘The Perception of Music: Sources of Significance’: Symposium.Malcolm Budd - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):289-292.
    My response consists essentially of an attempt to throw light on Peacocke's basic proposal as to how musical expressiveness should be understood by a comparison and contrast with a somewhat similar suggestion of mine.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2019-06-06
    Music, Isomorphism and Metaphor: Comments on Peacocke’s ‘The Perception of Music: Sources of Significance’.José Luis Bermúdez - 2009 - Modern Schoolman 86 (3/4):261-265.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. added 2019-06-06
    Landscape Perception: Theory-Laden, Emotionally Resonant, Politically Correct.Stephanie Ross - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (3):245-263.
    Our primal ability to see one thing in terms of another shapes our landscape perception. Although modes of appreciation are tied to personal interests and situations, there are many lines of conflict and incompatibility between these modes. A religious point of view is unacceptable to those without religious beliefs. Background knowledge is similarly required for taking an arts or science-based view of landscape, although this knowledge can be acquired. How to cultivate responses grounded in imagination, emotion, and instinct is less (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. added 2019-06-06
    Art, Nature Et Expérience Esthétique Chez Kant.Claude Veillette - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (2):219-234.
    Au § 45 de la Critique de la facultè de juger, Kant écrit: «La nature était belle lorsqu'elle avait incontinent l'apparence de l'art; et l'art ne peut être appelé beau que lorsque nous sommes conscients qu'il s'agit bien d'art, mais qu'il prend pour nous l'apparence de la nature». Ce qui semble à première vue n'être qu'un simple «paradoxes Gedankenspiel» nous convie au contraire à l'un des problèmes les plus intéressants de la troisième Critique: celui du rapport entre la beauté de (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. added 2019-06-06
    IV—Aesthetic Perception and Aesthetic Qualities.K. Mitchells - 1966 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 67 (1):53-72.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. added 2019-05-15
    Conceptual And Nonconceptual Modes Of Music Perception.Mark Debellis - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):45-61.
    What does it mean to say that music perception is nonconceptual? As the passages from Meyer and Budd illustrate, one frequently encounters claims of this kind: it is often suggested that there is a level of perceptual contact with, or understanding or enjoyment of, music—one in which listeners typically engage—that does not require conceptualization. But just what does a claim of this sort amount to, and what arguments may be adduced for it? And is all musical hearing nonconceptual, or are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. added 2019-05-06
    Pictorial Representation And Moral Knowledge.Katerina Bantinaki - 2004 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 1 (2):69-76.
    The idea that pictorial art can have cognitive value, that it can enhance our understanding of the world and of our own selves, has had many advocates in art theory and philosophical aesthetics alike. It has also been argued, however, that the power of pictorial representation to convey or enhance knowledge, in particular knowledge with moral content, is not generalized across the medium.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. added 2019-01-02
    Toward a Science of Criticism: Aesthetic Values, Human Nature, and the Standard of Taste.Collier Mark - 2014 - In Cognition, Literature, and History. Routledge. pp. 229-242.
    The aesthetic skeptic maintains that it is futile to dispute about taste. One and the same work of art might appear beautiful to one person but repellent to another, and we have no reason to prefer one or another of these conflicting verdicts. Hume argues that the skeptic, however, moves too quickly. The crucial question is whether qualified critics will agree on their evaluations. And the skeptic fails to provide sufficient evidence that their verdicts will diverge. We have reason to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. added 2018-12-01
    La phénoménologie de la vie chez Erwin Straus.Charles Bobant - 2018 - Études Phénoménologiques 2:199-215.
    This paper focuses on Erwin Straus' phenomenology of life. I start by clarifying its object - the human being - and its purpose - to found a human nosology. I then reframe two well-known aspects of his thought. First, the "primary animal situation" which includes many conceptual dualities (animal/human, sensing/perceiving, landscape/geography, life-world/world of perception, schizophrenia/melancholy) as well as a major philosophical proposition: the identity between sensing and movement. Second, I took at the I-World relation, understood by Straus as a relation (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. added 2018-11-28
    Hume and the Value of the Beautiful.J. Shelley - 2011 - British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):213-222.
    Hume is plausibly interpreted as asserting that an artwork is beautiful if and only if it pleases ideal critics. Jerrold Levinson maintains that Hume's commitment to this biconditional gives rise to a problem that occurs neither to Hume nor to his any of his interpreters—the problem of explaining why you should care what pleases ideal critics if you are not one yourself. I argue that this problem arises only if you hold an empiricist theory of aesthetic value—that is, a theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  36. added 2018-11-28
    The Problem of Non-Perceptual Art.James Shelley - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):363-378.
    Consider the following three propositions: (R) Artworks necessarily have aesthetic properties that are relevant to their appreciation as artworks. (S) Aesthetic properties necessarily depend, at least in part, on properties perceived by means of the five senses. (X) There exist artworks that need not be perceived by means of the five senses to be appreciated as artworks. The independent plausibility and apparent joint inconsistency of these three propositions give rise to what I refer to as ‘the problem of non-perceptual art’. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  37. added 2018-11-17
    Über die Reichweite ästhetischer Erfahrung: Fünf Thesen.Martin Seel - 2004 - In Gerd Mattenklott (ed.), Ästhetische Erfahrung im Zeichen der Entgrenzung der Künste. Epistemische, ästhetische und religiöse Formen von Erfahrung im Vergleich. Hamburg: Meiner. pp. 73-81.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. added 2018-09-09
    The Affective Experience of Aesthetic Properties.Kris Goffin - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (1):283-300.
    It is widely agreed upon that aesthetic properties, such as grace, balance, and elegance, are perceived. I argue that aesthetic properties are experientially attributed to some non‐perceptible objects. For example, a mathematical proof can be experienced as elegant. In order to give a unified explanation of the experiential attribution of aesthetic properties to both perceptible and non‐perceptible objects, one has to reject the idea that aesthetic properties are perceived. I propose an alternative view: the affective account. I argue that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. added 2018-08-20
    Experiencing Metaphorically-As in Music Perception: Clarifications and Commitments: Symposium.Christopher Peacocke - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):299-306.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. added 2018-05-30
    Reid on the Moral Sense.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1):80-101.
    Some interpret Reid’s notion of a moral sense as merely analogical. Others understand it as a species of acquired perception. To understand Reid’s account of the moral sense, we must draw from his theory of perception and his theory of aesthetic experience, each of which illuminate the nature and operation of the moral faculty. I argue that, on Reid’s view, the moral faculty is neither affective nor rational, but representational. It is a discrete, basic, capacity for representing the real moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. added 2018-03-20
    Sculpture and Touch: Herder's Aesthetics of Sculpture.Rachel Zuckert - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (3):285-299.
    I present and analyze J.G. Herder’s aesthetics of sculpture, as an art form directed toward and appreciated by the sense of touch. I argue that Herder is unsuccessful in his attempt so to define sculpture, but his account is nonetheless fruitful, both in making salient and explaining signal aspects of sculptural appreciation and criticism and, more broadly and quite innovatively, in proposing an aesthetics of touch, even an embodied aesthetics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. added 2018-03-20
    The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism.Rachel Zuckert - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):599-622.
    Rachel Zuckert - The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44:4 Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 599-622 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents The Purposiveness of Form: A Reading of Kant's Aesthetic Formalism Rachel Zuckert In the "critique of aesthetic judgment," Kant claims that when we find an object beautiful, we are appreciating its "purposive form." Many of Kant's readers have found this claim one of his least interesting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. added 2018-03-08
    The Aesthetic Experience of Artworks and Everyday Scenes.Bence Nanay - 2018 - The Monist 101 (1):71-82.
    Some of our aesthetic experiences are of artworks. Some others are of everyday scenes. The question I examine in this paper is about the relation between these two different kinds of aesthetic experience. I argue that the experience of artworks can dispose us to experience everyday scenes in an aesthetic manner both short-term and long-term. Finally, I examine what constraints this phenomenon puts on different accounts of aesthetic experience.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. added 2018-02-17
    Aesthetics and Material Beauty: Aesthetics Naturalized.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2007 - Routledge.
    In _Aesthetics and Material Beauty_, Jennifer A. McMahon develops a new aesthetic theory she terms Critical Aesthetic Realism - taking Kantian aesthetics as a starting point and drawing upon contemporary theories of mind from philosophy, psychology, and cognitive science. The creative process does not proceed by a set of rules. Yet the fact that its objects can be understood or appreciated by others suggests that the creative process is constrained by principles to which others have access. According to her update (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  45. added 2018-02-17
    The Appreciation And Perception Of Easel Paintings.S. J. Wilsmore - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (3):246-256.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. added 2017-06-03
    Up the Nose of the Beholder? Aesthetic Perception in Olfaction as a Decision-Making Process.Ann-Sophie Barwich - 2017 - New Ideas in Psychology 47:157-165.
    Is the sense of smell a source of aesthetic perception? Traditional philosophical aesthetics has centered on vision and audition but eliminated smell for its subjective and inherently affective character. This article dismantles the myth that olfaction is an unsophisticated sense. It makes a case for olfactory aesthetics by integrating recent insights in neuroscience with traditional expertise about flavor and fragrance assessment in perfumery and wine tasting. My analysis concerns the importance of observational refinement in aesthetic experience. I argue that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47. added 2017-04-21
    Seeing Depicted Space (or Not).Mikael Pettersson - forthcoming - In Anna Bergqvist & Robert Cowan (eds.), Evaluative Perception. Oxford University Press.
    What is it to see something in a picture? Most accounts of pictorial experience—or, to use Richard Wollheim’s term, ‘seeing-in’—seek, in various ways, to explain it in terms of how pictures somehow display the looks of things. However, some ‘things’ that we apparently see in pictures do not display any ‘look.’ In particular, most pictures depict empty space, but empty space does not seem to display any ‘look’—at least not in the way material objects do. How do we see it (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. added 2017-02-23
    Reasoned and Unreasoned Judgement: On Inference, Acquaintance and Aesthetic Normativity.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):1-17.
    Aesthetic non-inferentialism is the widely-held thesis that aesthetic judgements either are identical to, or are made on the basis of, sensory states like perceptual experience and emotion. It is sometimes objected to on the basis that testimony is a legitimate source of such judgements. Less often is the view challenged on the grounds that one’s inferences can be a source of aesthetic judgements. This paper aims to do precisely that. According to the theory defended here, aesthetic judgements may be unreasoned, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. added 2017-02-14
    Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception, by Bence Nanay. [REVIEW]Ophelia Deroy - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):635-643.
    Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception, by Bence Nanay. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 240.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. added 2017-02-14
    Art and the Brain.Semir Zeki - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
    The article defines the function of the visual brain as a search for constancies with the aim of obtaining knowledge about the world, and claims that it is applicable with equal vigour to the function of art. We define the general function of art as a search for the constant, lasting, essential, and enduring features of objects, surfaces, faces, situations, and so on, which allows us not only to acquire knowledge about the particular object, or face, or condition represented on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
1 — 50 / 246