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  1. Philosophical Perspectives on Depiction.Catharine Abell & Katerina Bantinaki (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume of specially written essays by leading philosophers offers to set the agenda for the philosophy of depiction.
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  2. Musical Perceptions.Rita Aiello & John A. Sloboda (eds.) - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Musical Perceptions is a much-needed text that introduces students of both music and psychology to the study of music perception and cognition. Because the book aims to foster a closer interaction between research in the science and the art of music, both psychologists and musicians contribute chapters on a wide range of topics, including the philosophy of music; research in musical performance; perception of melody, tonality, and rhythm; pedagogical issues; language and music; and neural networks. With their unique ability to (...)
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  3. Education for Aesthetic Vision.Virgil C. Aldrich - 1968 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 2 (4):101.
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  4. Aesthetic Perception and Objectivity.Virgil C. Aldrich & P. E. Slatter - 1978 - British Journal of Aesthetics 18 (3):209-216.
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  5. Aesthetic Perception in Dufrenne's Phenomenology of Aesthetic Experience.David G. Allen - 1978 - Philosophy Today 22 (1):50-64.
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  6. Style as a Gestalt Problem.Rudolf Arnheim - 1981 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (3):281-289.
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  7. Art and Visual Perception: The New Version.Rudolf Arnheim - 1976 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (3):361-364.
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  8. Colors: Irrational and Rational.Rudolf Arnheim - 1974 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (2):149-154.
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  9. Visual Thinking.Rudolf Arnheim - 1969 - London: Faber.
    "Groundbreaking when first published in 1969, this book is now of even greater relevance to make the reader aware of the need to educate the visual sense, a ...
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  10. Perceptual Analysis of a Cosmological Symbol.Rudolf Arnheim - 1961 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (4):389-399.
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  11. Historical Formalism in Music: Toward a Philosophical Theory of Musical Form.Andrea Baldini - 2014 - Contemporary Aesthetics 12:N/A.
    In this paper I begin to fashion a theory of musical form that I call historical formalism. Historical formalism posits that our perception of the formal properties of a musical work is informed by considerations not only of artistic categories but also of the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural circumstances within which that work was composed.
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  12. Pictorial Perception as Illusion.Katerina Bantinaki - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):268-279.
    The focus of this paper is on E. H. Gombrich's claim that pictorial perception is a case of illusion. My aim is to point out that, on the one hand, the interpretation of this claim that is widely accepted in pictorial theory is not supported by Gombrich's analysis of pictorial perception; and, on the other hand, that the interpretation of the claim that I see as more compatible with Gombrich's analysis is not consistent with relevant facts about our relation to (...)
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  13. Up the Nose of the Beholder? Aesthetic Perception in Olfaction as a Decision-Making Process.Ann-Sophie Barwich - 2017 - New Ideas in Psychology 47:157-165.
    Is the sense of smell a source of aesthetic perception? Traditional philosophical aesthetics has centered on vision and audition but eliminated smell for its subjective and inherently affective character. This article dismantles the myth that olfaction is an unsophisticated sense. It makes a case for olfactory aesthetics by integrating recent insights in neuroscience with traditional expertise about flavor and fragrance assessment in perfumery and wine tasting. My analysis concerns the importance of observational refinement in aesthetic experience. I argue that the (...)
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  14. Colouring Philosophy: Appel, Lyotard and Art's Work.Andrew Benjamin - 2010 - Critical Horizons 11 (3):379-395.
    Colour plays a fundamental role in the philosophical treatments of painting. Colour while it is an essential part of the work of art cannot be divorced from the account of painting within which it is articulated. This paper begins with a discussion of the role of colour in Schelling's conception of art. Nonetheless its primary concern is to develop a critical encounter with Jean-François Lyotard's analysis of the Dutch painter Karel Appel. The limits of Lyotard's writings on painting, which this (...)
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  15. Music, Isomorphism and Metaphor: Comments on Peacocke’s ‘The Perception of Music: Sources of Significance’.José Luis Bermúdez - 2009 - Modern Schoolman 86 (3-4):261-265.
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  16. Beauty, Embodiment, and Art.Arthur Berndtson - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (1):50-61.
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  17. Crafts, Perception, and the Possibilities of the Body.M. A. Boden - 2000 - British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):289-301.
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  18. The Perception of Music: Comments on Peacocke.Paul Boghossian - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (1):71-76.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  19. Phenomenology is Art, Not Psychological or Neural Science.David A. Booth - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):408-409.
    It is tough to relate visual perception or other achievements to physiological processing in the central nervous system. The diagrammatic, algebraic, and verbal pictures of how sights seem to Lehar do not advance understanding of how we manage to see what is in the world. There are well-known conceptual reasons why no such purely introspective approach can be productive.
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  20. The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder.Maria Brincker - 2015 - In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer. pp. 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  21. Perception and the Appraisal of Sculpture.Donald Brook - 1969 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (3):323-330.
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  22. On Aesthetic Perception.Jason W. Brown - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
    The article explores conceptual, intentional, and emotional dimensions of art , drawing on ideas from process theory , clinical neuropathology and phenomenology. The interdependence of emotion and perception are outlined, with emphasis on the more general role of knowledge in guiding perception.
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  23. Response to Christopher Peacocke's 'the Perception of Music: Sources of Significance'.Malcolm Budd - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):289-292.
    My response consists essentially of an attempt to throw light on (and encourage further elucidation of) Peacocke's basic proposal as to how musical expressiveness should be understood by a comparison and contrast with a somewhat similar suggestion of mine.
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  24. The Musical Expression of Emotion: Metaphorical-As Versus Imaginative-As Perception.Malcolm Budd - 2012 - Estetika 49 (2):131-147.
    The paper begins with an overview of various well-known accounts of the musical expression of emotion that have been proposed in recent years. But rather than proceeding to assess the merits and faults of these accounts the paper examines whether a radically new theory by Christopher Peacocke is superior to all of them. The theory, which certainly has a number of attractive features, is based on the idea of metaphorical-as perception. The notion of metaphorical-as perception needs to be elucidated and (...)
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  25. Musical Movement and Aesthetic Metaphors.Malcolm Budd - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):209-223.
    Roger Scruton's extraordinarily rich and impressive book The Aesthetics of Music has not received the attention it deserves. In this paper I take issue with one of its most striking claims, namely that the basic perceptions of music are informed by spatial concepts understood metaphorically. To evaluate this claim it is necessary to grasp Scruton's theory of metaphor, which has largely been neglected. I sketch his theory and derive from it the essence of his claim about the fundamental role of (...)
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  26. Feeling, Meaning, and Intentionality—a Critique of the Neuroaesthetics of Beauty.Peer F. Bundgaard - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):781-801.
    This article addresses the phenomenology of aesthetic experience. It first, critically, considers one of the most influential approaches to the psychophysics of aesthetic perception, viz. neuroaesthetics. Hereafter, it outlines constitutive tenets of aesthetic perception in terms of a particular intentional relation to the object. The argument comes in three steps. First, I show the inadequacies of the neuroaesthetics of beauty in general and Semir Zeki’s and V.J. Ramachandran’s versions of it in particular. The neuroaesthetics of beauty falls short, because it (...)
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  27. Towards a Sensorimotor Aesthetics of Performing Art.B. Calvomerino, C. Jola, D. Glaser & P. Haggard - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):911-922.
    The field of neuroaesthetics attempts to identify the brain processes underlying aesthetic experience, including but not limited to beauty. Previous neuroaesthetic studies have focussed largely on paintings and music, while performing arts such as dance have been less studied. Nevertheless, increasing knowledge of the neural mechanisms that represent the bodies and actions of others, and which contribute to empathy, make a neuroaesthetics of dance timely. Here, we present the first neuroscientific study of aesthetic perception in the context of the performing (...)
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  28. Modernity and the Plasticity of Perception.Noël Carroll - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (1):11-17.
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  29. Reasoned and Unreasoned Judgement: On Inference, Acquaintance and Aesthetic Normativity.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (1):1-17.
    Aesthetic non-inferentialism is the widely-held thesis that aesthetic judgements either are identical to, or are made on the basis of, sensory states like perceptual experience and emotion. It is sometimes objected to on the basis that testimony is a legitimate source of such judgements. Less often is the view challenged on the grounds that one’s inferences can be a source of aesthetic judgements. This paper aims to do precisely that. According to the theory defended here, aesthetic judgements may be unreasoned, (...)
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  30. Perspectives on Perception: Philosophy, Art, and Literature.Mary Ann Cawes (ed.) - 1989 - Peter Lang.
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  31. Sensation as Participation in Visual Art.Clive Cazeaux - 2012 - Aesthetic Pathways 2 (2):2-30.
    Can an understanding be formed of how sensory experience might be presented or manipulated in visual art in order to promote a relational concept of the senses, in opposition to the customary, capitalist notion of sensation as a private possession, as a sensory impression that is mine? I ask the question in the light of recent visual art theory and practice which pursue relational, ecological ambitions. As Arnold Berleant, Nicolas Bourriaud, and Grant Kester see it, ecological ambition and artistic form (...)
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  32. In Radical Form(Ation): Bergsonism, Bodies in Process, and Unconscious Vision.Lia Chavez - unknown
    In this practice-led research I aim, through text and visual artworks, to examine the dynamic, vitalist body of ‘emergent forms’ and becomings in art. From a theoretical standpoint, I focus my examination on Classical Bergsonism and the unique implications it holds for the figure in time. I probe Henri Bergson’s insistence upon the notion that life and reality are in constant flux in order to explore how this central claim could shed light on the status of the dynamic or shifting (...)
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  33. Possibilities of Perception.Jennifer Church - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Jennifer Church presents a new account of perception, which shows how imagining alternative perspectives and possibilities plays a key role in creating and validating experiences of self-evident objectivity. She explores the nature of moral perception and aesthetic perception, and argues that perception can be both literal and substantive.
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  34. Joint Attention to Music.Tom Cochrane - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):59-73.
    This paper contrasts individual and collective listening to music, with particular regard to the expressive qualities of music. In the first half of the paper a general model of joint attention is introduced. According to this model, perceiving together modifies the intrinsic structure of the perceptual task, and encourages a convergence of responses to a greater or lesser degree. The model is then applied to music, looking first at the silent listening situation typical to the classical concert hall, and second (...)
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  35. Thomas Reid on Aesthetic Perception.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2015 - In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Thomas Reid on Mind, Knowledge and Value. pp. 124-138.
  36. Reid on the Moral Sense.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1):80-101.
    Some interpret Reid’s notion of a moral sense as merely analogical. Others understand it as a species of acquired perception. To understand Reid’s account of the moral sense, we must draw from his theory of perception and his theory of aesthetic experience, each of which illuminate the nature and operation of the moral faculty. I argue that, on Reid’s view, the moral faculty is neither affective nor rational, but representational. It is a discrete, basic, capacity for representing the real moral (...)
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  37. Training Aesthetic Perception: John Dewey on the Educational Role of Art Museums.Tracie E. Costantino - 2004 - Educational Theory 54 (4):399-417.
    In this article I examine Dewey's ambivalent attitude toward art museums — criticizing their existence as repositories for the rich, while exploring their educational potential — by analyzing Dewey's comments on museums in various texts, by relating his ideas to museum education theories and practice of the time, and by exploring his involvement with Albert Barnes and the Barnes Foundation. Specifically, I discuss how these men influenced each other and consider possible reasons for Dewey's involvement with a “capitalist collector” such (...)
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  38. Suspensions of Perception. Attention, Spectacle, and Modern Culture.Jonathan Crary - 2000 - The MIT Press.
    Suspensions of Perception decisively relocates the problem of aesthetic contemplation within a broader collective encounter with the unstable nature of ...
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  39. Aesthetic Concepts, Perceptual Learning, and Linguistic Enculturation: Considerations From Wittgenstein, Language, and Music.Adam M. Croom - 2012 - Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science 46:90-117.
    Aesthetic non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express genuinely aesthetic beliefs and instead hold that they work primarily to express something non-cognitive, such as attitudes of approval or disapproval, or desire. Non-cognitivists deny that aesthetic statements express aesthetic beliefs because they deny that there are aesthetic features in the world for aesthetic beliefs to represent. Their assumption, shared by scientists and theorists of mind alike, was that language-users possess cognitive mechanisms with which to objectively grasp abstract rules fixed independently of human (...)
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  40. Phenomenology of the Visual Arts.Paul Crowther - 2009 - Stanford University Press.
    Why are the visual arts so important and what is it that makes their forms significant? Countering recent interpretations of meaning that understand visual artworks on the model of literary texts, Crowther formulates a theory of the visual arts based on what their creation achieves both cognitively and aesthetically. He develops a phenomenology that emphasizes how visual art gives unique aesthetic expression to factors that are basic to perception. At the same time, he shows how various artistic media embody these (...)
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  41. Merleau–Ponty: Perception Into Art.Paul Crowther - 1982 - British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (2):138-149.
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  42. Emerging Visions of the Aesthetic Process: Psychology, Semiology, and Philosophy.Gerald C. Cupchik & János László (eds.) - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is about aesthetic processes and play from the perspectives of psychologists, philosophers, and semiologists. They explore the underlying processes from many viewpoints, including the prehistoric roots of language and art; the historical evolution of artistic, literary, and musical styles; the structure of artworks from both gestalt and semiotic perspectives; the biological and psychological processes underlying production and appreciation; the appeal of sentimental art; emotional responses to art and other aesthetic forms; personality in relation to artistic style; the testing (...)
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  43. Photography, Painting and Perception.Gregory Currie - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):23-29.
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  44. On Richard Wollheim.S. Davies, R. Hopkins, J. Robinson & M. Padro - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):213-225.
    There was a deep continuity in Wollheim’s thought from his book on F. H. Bradley onward. His notion of the concept of art as deeply interiorized was inextricable from his sense of the psychological unity of the mind and the historical continuity of artistic tradition, seen on analogy with an inherited language. His study of pictorial representation pivoted on the innate psychological capacity of ‘seeing-in’, perceiving the represented subject in a surface from which it was seen as distinct but to (...)
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  45. The Education of the Eye: Painting, Landscape, and Architecture in Eighteenth-Century Britain.Peter De Bolla - 2003 - Stanford University Press.
    The Education of the Eye examines the origins of visual culture in eighteenth-century Britain. It claims that at the moment when works of visual art were first displayed and contemplated as aesthetic objects two competing descriptions of the viewer or spectator promoted two very different accounts of culture. The first was constructed on knowledge, on what one already knew, while the second was grounded in the eye itself. Though the first was most likely to lead to a socially and politically (...)
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  46. Aesthetic Ineffability.Rafael De Clercq - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (8-9):87-97.
    In this paper I argue that recent attempts at explaining aesthetic ineffability have been unsuccessful. Either they misrepresent what aesthetic ineffability consists in, or they leave important aspects of it unexplained. I then show how a more satisfying account might be developed, once a distinction is made between two kinds of awareness. -/- .
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  47. Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception, by Bence Nanay.Ophelia Deroy - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):635-643.
    Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception, by Bence Nanay. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 240.
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  48. Beyond Vision: The Vertical Integration of Sensory Substitution Devices.Ophelia Deroy & Malika Auvray - 2015 - In D. Stokes, M. Matthen & S. Biggs (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press.
    What if a blind person could 'see' with her ears? Thanks to Sensory Substitution Devices (SSDs), blind people now have access to out-of-reach objects, a privilege reserved so far for the sighted. In this paper, we show that the philosophical debates have fundamentally been mislead to think that SSDs should be fitted among the existing senses or that they constitute a new sense. Contrary to the existing assumption that they get integrated at the sensory level, we present a new thesis (...)
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  49. Influence of Aesthetic Perception on Visual Event-Related Potentials.M. DetoMmaso, C. PeCoraro, M. Sardaro, C. Serpino, G. Lancioni & P. Livrea - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):933-945.
    The aim of the study was to assess the effects of visual aesthetic perception on event-related potentials . Eight subjects assigned an aesthetic judgment and a 10-step beauty estimation to the target stimuli, consisting of famous artistic pictures and geometric shapes. In a further task, the subjects performed a motor response to the previously judged pictures and geometric shapes. ERPs were recorded through 54 scalp electrodes during both tasks. The P3b amplitude was increased during the categorization of the geometric shapes (...)
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  50. Stolnitz's Attitude: Taste and Perception.George Dickie - 1984 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (2):195-203.
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