Results for 'Michael B. Heaney'

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  1.  63
    A Symmetrical Interpretation of the Klein-Gordon Equation.Michael B. Heaney - 2013 - Foundations of Physics 43 (6):733-746.
    This paper presents a new Symmetrical Interpretation (SI) of relativistic quantum mechanics which postulates: quantum mechanics is a theory about complete experiments, not particles; a complete experiment is maximally described by a complex transition amplitude density; and this transition amplitude density never collapses. This SI is compared to the Copenhagen Interpretation (CI) for the analysis of Einstein’s bubble experiment. This SI makes several experimentally testable predictions that differ from the CI, solves one part of the measurement problem, resolves some inconsistencies (...)
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  2. Objects and Persons. [REVIEW]Michael B. Burker - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (4):586-588.
    Over the last two or three decades, puzzles concerning vagueness, identity, and material constitution have led an increasing number of ontologists to “eliminate” at least some of the objects of folk ontology. In the book here reviewed, Trenton Merricks proposes to eliminate any and all material objects that lack nonredundant causal powers. The objects found lacking include statues, baseballs, planets, and all other inanimate macroscopica, including the masses and conjunctive objects favored by some other eliminativists. The objects found to possess (...)
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  3. Brain Death and Personal Identity.Michael B. Green & Daniel Wikler - 1980 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (2):105-133.
     
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  4.  83
    On Eating Animals: Michael B. Gill.Michael B. Gill - 2013 - Social Philosophy and Policy 30 (1-2):201-207.
    This essay is a critical response to Loren Lomasky's essay in this volume: The essay argues that Lomasky both overestimates the value of eating meat and underestimates the harms to animals of practices surrounding meat eating. While Lomasky takes the fact that an animal would not have lived at all if it were not being raised for food to constitute a benefit for animals being so raised, this essay argues that it would be better for animals raised on factory farms (...)
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  5.  11
    God Without the Supernatural: A Defense of Scientific Theism.Michael B. Wakoff - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (4):621.
    Peter Forrest argues that theism is warranted by an inference to the best explanation that does not posit God as a supernatural entity. Lest theists fear that Forrest settles for an ersatz naturalistic conception of God, let me reassure them that his view might be captured by the slogan, "Neither a naturalist nor a supernaturalist be!" Both naturalism and supernaturalism attempt to understand what Forrest calls the "familiar"—the things observable by humans, including the phenomena of consciousness—but they differ about the (...)
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  6. Copper Statues and Pieces of Copper: A Challenge to the Standard Account.Michael B. Burke - 1992 - Analysis 52 (1):12 - 17.
    On the most popular account of material constitution, it is common for a material object to coincide precisely with one or more other material objects, ones that are composed of just the same matter but differ from it in sort. I argue that there is nothing that could ground the alleged difference in sort and that the account must be rejected.
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  7.  42
    The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics.Michael B. Gill - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, in this volume Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then from (...)
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  8. Indeterminacy and Variability in Meta-Ethics.Michael B. Gill - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (2):215-234.
    In the mid-20th century, descriptive meta-ethics addressed a number of central questions, such as whether there is a necessary connection between moral judgment and motivation, whether moral reasons are absolute or relative, and whether moral judgments express attitudes or describe states of affairs. I maintain that much of this work in mid-20th century meta-ethics proceeded on an assumption that there is good reason to question. The assumption was that our ordinary discourse is uniform and determinate enough to vindicate one side (...)
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  9. Brain Death and Personal Identity.Michael B. Green & Daniel Wikler - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Philosophy and Public Affairs. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 105 - 133.
  10. Humean Moral Pluralism.Michael B. Gill - 2011 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (1):45.
    Michael B. Gill offers a new account of Humean moral pluralism: the view that there are different moral reasons for action, which are based on human sentiments. He explores its historical origins, and argues that it offers the most compelling view of our moral experience. Together, pluralism and Humeanism make a philosophically powerful couple.
     
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  11. Moral Rationalism Vs. Moral Sentimentalism: Is Morality More Like Math or Beauty?Michael B. Gill - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (1):16–30.
    One of the most significant disputes in early modern philosophy was between the moral rationalists and the moral sentimentalists. The moral rationalists — such as Ralph Cudworth, Samuel Clarke and John Balguy — held that morality originated in reason alone. The moral sentimentalists — such as Anthony Ashley Cooper, the third Earl of Shaftesbury, Francis Hutcheson and David Hume — held that morality originated at least partly in sentiment. In addition to arguments, the rationalists and sentimentalists developed rich analogies. The (...)
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  12.  16
    Economic Inequality, Food Insecurity, and the Erosion of Equality of Capabilities in the United States.Michael B. Elmes - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (6):1045-1074.
    This article explores how economic inequality in the United States has led to growing levels of poverty, food insecurity, and obesity for the bottom segments of the economy. It takes the position that access to nutritious food is a requirement for living and for participating fully in the workplace and society. Because of increasing economic inequality in the United States, growing segments of the U.S. economy have become more food insecure and obese, eating unhealthy food for survival and suffering an (...)
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  13. Presumed Consent, Autonomy, and Organ Donation.Michael B. Gill - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (1):37 – 59.
    I argue that a policy of presumed consent for cadaveric organ procurement, which assumes that people do want to donate their organs for transplantation after their death, would be a moral improvement over the current American system, which assumes that people do not want to donate their organs. I address what I take to be the most important objection to presumed consent. The objection is that if we implement presumed consent we will end up removing organs from the bodies of (...)
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  14. Sentimentalist Pluralism: Moral Psychology and Philosophical Ethics.Michael B. Gill & Shaun Nichols - 2008 - Philosophical Issues 18 (1):143-163.
    When making moral judgments, people are typically guided by a plurality of moral rules. These rules owe their existence to human emotions but are not simply equivalent to those emotions. And people’s moral judgments ought to be guided by a plurality of emotion-based rules. The view just stated combines three positions on moral judgment: [1] moral sentimentalism, which holds that sentiments play an essential role in moral judgment,1 [2] descriptive moral pluralism, which holds that commonsense moral judgment is guided by (...)
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  15. Cohabitation, Stuff and Intermittent Existence.Michael B. Burke - 1980 - Mind 89 (355):391-405.
    I aim to show that there are cases in which an ordinary material object exists intermittently. Afterwards there are a few words about the consequences of acknowledging such cases, but what is of more interest is the route by which the conclusion is reached. When deciding among competing descriptions of the cases considered, I have tried to reduce to a minimum the role of intuitive judgment, and I have based several arguments on "metaphysical principles," two of which I have defended.
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  16.  41
    The Infinitistic Thesis.Michael B. Burke - 1984 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):295-305.
  17.  39
    The Impossibility of Superfeats.Michael B. Burke - 2000 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (2):207-220.
    Is it logically possible to perform a "superfeat"? That is, is it logically possible to complete, in a finite time, an infinite sequence of distinct acts? In opposition to the received view, I argue that all physical superfeats have kinematic features that make them logically impossible.
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  18.  9
    Momente und ihre Menschen im Zeitzeugen-Interview.Michael B. Buchholz - 2018 - Paragrana: Internationale Zeitschrift für Historische Anthropologie 27 (1):202-218.
    As shown in my text in Part I of this volume, the Boston theory, Goffman, and some parts of mentalization theory all address the phenomenon of special “moments”. These theories value the role of conversation very differently. Goffman’s theory comprises most; conversation is what makes “moments” possible but “moments” are not the goal of every “talk-in-interaction”. More specified conditions of “moments” will be described with the goal to apply them to a transcribed interviewed with a Holocaust survivor. Conversation analysis in (...)
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  19. Variability and Moral Phenomenology.Michael B. Gill - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):99-113.
    Many moral philosophers in the Western tradition have used phenomenological claims as starting points for philosophical inquiry; aspects of moral phenomenology have often been taken to be anchors to which any adequate account of morality must remain attached. This paper raises doubts about whether moral phenomena are universal and robust enough to serve the purposes to which moral philosophers have traditionally tried to put them. Persons’ experiences of morality may vary in a way that greatly limits the extent to which (...)
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  20. Dion, Theon, and the Many-Thinkers Problem.Michael B. Burke - 2004 - Analysis 64 (3):242–250.
    Dion is a full-bodied man. Theon is that part of him which consists of all of him except his left foot. What becomes of Dion and Theon when Dion’s left foot is amputated? In Burke 1994, employing the doctrine of sortal essentialism, I defended a surprising position last defended by Chrysippus: that Dion survives while the seemingly unscathed Theon perishes. This paper defends that position against objections by Stone, Carter, Olson, and others. Most notably, it offers a novel, conservative solution (...)
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  21.  18
    Unstated Premises.Michael B. Burke - 1985 - Informal Logic 7 (2).
  22.  89
    From Cambridge Platonism to Scottish Sentimentalism.Michael B. Gill - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):13-31.
    The Cambridge Platonists were a group of religious thinkers who attended and taught at Cambridge from the 1640s until the 1660s. The four most important of them were Benjamin Whichcote, John Smith, Ralph Cudworth, and Henry More. The most prominent sentimentalist moral philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment – Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith – knew of the works of the Cambridge Platonists. But the Scottish sentimentalists typically referred to the Cambridge Platonists only briefly and in passing. The surface of Hutcheson, (...)
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  23. Is My Head a Person?Michael B. Burke - 2003 - In K. Petrus (ed.), On Human Persons. Heusenstamm Nr Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag. pp. 107-125.
    It is hard to see why the head and other brain-containing parts of a person are not themselves persons, or at least thinking, conscious beings. Some theorists have sought to reconcile us to the existence of thinking person-parts. Others have sought to avoid them, but have relied on radical theories at odds with the metaphysic implicit in ordinary ways of thinking. This paper offers a novel, conservative solution, one on which the heads and other brain-containing parts of persons do exist (...)
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  24.  75
    Paying for Kidneys: The Case Against Prohibition.Michael B. Gill & Robert M. Sade - 2002 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):17-45.
    : We argue that healthy people should be allowed to sell one of their kidneys while they are alive—that the current prohibition on payment for kidneys ought to be overturned. Our argument has three parts. First, we argue that the moral basis for the current policy on live kidney donations and on the sale of other kinds of tissue implies that we ought to legalize the sale of kidneys. Second, we address the objection that the sale of kidneys is intrinsically (...)
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  25.  11
    Empathie und »Typische Problem-Situationen«.Michael B. Buchholz - 2017 - Psyche 71 (1):28-59.
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  26. The Principles and Content of African Traditional Education.Michael B. Adeyemi & Augustus A. Adeyinka - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (4):425–440.
  27.  58
    Pediatric Do-Not-Attempt-Resuscitation Orders and Public Schools: A National Assessment of Policies and Laws.Michael B. Kimberly, Amanda L. Forte, Jean M. Carroll & Chris Feudtner - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):59 – 65.
    Some children living with life-shortening medical conditions may wish to attend school without the threat of having resuscitation attempted in the event of cardiopulmonary arrest on the school premises. Despite recent attention to in-school do-not-attempt-resuscitation (DNAR) orders, no assessment of state laws or school policies has yet been made. We therefore sought to survey a national sample of prominent school districts and situate their policies in the context of relevant state laws. Most (80%) school districts sampled did not have policies, (...)
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  28.  39
    Denying the Antecedent: A Common Fallacy?Michael B. Burke - 1994 - Informal Logic 16 (1).
    An argumentative passage that might appear to be an instance of denying the antecedent will generally admit of an alternative interpretation, one on which the conditional contained by the passage is a preface to the argument rather than a premise of it. On this interpretation. which generally is a more charitable one, the conditional plays a certain dialectical role and, in some cases, a rhetorical role as well. Assuming only a very weak principle of exigetical charity, I consider what it (...)
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  29.  24
    Shaftesbury on Life as a Work of Art.Michael B. Gill - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1110-1131.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explicates Shaftesbury’s idea that we ought to live our lives as though they are works of art. I show that this idea is central to many of Shaftesbury’s most important claims, and that an understanding of this idea enables us to answer some of the most contested questions in the scholarship on Characteristics.
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  30.  38
    Morality is Not Like Mathematics: The Weakness of the Math‐Moral Analogy.Michael B. Gill - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (2):194-216.
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  31.  15
    The Grain Objection.Michael B. Green - 1979 - Philosophy of Science 46 (4):559-589.
    Many philosophers, both past and present, object to materialism not from any romantic anti-scientific bent, but from sheer inability to understand the thesis. It seems utterly inconceivable to some that qualia should exist in a world which is entirely material. This paper investigates the grain objection, a much neglected argument which purports to prove that sensations could not be brain events. Three versions are examined in great detail. The plausibility of the first version is shown to depend crucially on whether (...)
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  32.  3
    Kleine Theorie der Pause.Michael B. Buchholz - 2018 - Psyche 72 (2):91-121.
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  33.  90
    Tibbles the Cat: A Modern Sophisma.Michael B. Burke - 1996 - Philosophical Studies 84 (1):63 - 74.
    In this paper, I offer a novel, conservative solution to the puzzle of Tibbles the cat. I do not criticize the existing solutions or the theories within which they are embedded. I am content to offer an alternative, one that relies on the recently resurgent doctrine of Aristotelian essentialism. My solution, unlike some of its competitors, is applicable to the full range of cases in which, as with Tib and Tibbles, there is the threat of coinciding objects. In section 1, (...)
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  34. Toward the Outside: Concepts and Themes in Emmanuel Levinas.Michael B. Smith - 2005 - Duquesne University Press.
     
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  35. Meta-Ethical Variability, Incoherence, and Error.Michael B. Gill - unknown
    Moral cognitivists hold that in ordinary thought and language moral terms are used to make factual claims and express propositions. Moral non-cognitivists hold that in ordinary thought and language moral terms are not used to make factual claims or express propositions. What cognitivists and non-cognitivists seem to agree about, however, is that there is something in ordinary thought and language that can vindicate one side of their debate or the other. Don Loeb raises the possibility — which I will call (...)
     
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  36.  16
    The National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) Project: Moving Towards a Neurosciencebased Diagnostic Classification in Psychiatry.Michael B. First - 2012 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oxford University Press. pp. 12.
  37.  5
    Szenisches Verstehen und Konversationsanalyse.Michael B. Buchholz - 2019 - Psyche 73 (6):414-441.
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  38.  23
    Towards Candor, Cooperation, & Privacy in Applied Business Ethics Research: The Randomized Response Technique.Michael B. Metzger - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (2):207-221.
    Virtually every empirical inquiry of issues relevant to applied business ethics involves the asking of questions that are sensitive, embarrassing, threatening, stigmatizing, or incriminating. Accordingly, questions of this sort are likely to result in unsatisfactory outcomes: 1) many individuals will not respond; and/or, 2) many individuals will not respond candidly. An obvious objective, then, is to use a method to collect information which increases participation, provides absolute anonymity, and does not jeopardize subjects' privacy. The randomized response technique is a method (...)
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  39.  20
    Love of Humanity in Shaftesbury’s Moralists.Michael B. Gill - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (6):1117-1135.
    Shaftesbury believed that the height of virtue was impartial love for all of humanity. But Shaftesbury also harboured grave doubts about our ability to develop such an expansive love. In The Moralists, Shaftesbury addressed this problem. I show that while it may appear on the surface that The Moralists solves the difficulty, it in fact remains unresolved. Shaftesbury may not have been able to reconcile his view of the content of virtue with his view of our motivational psychology.
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  40.  91
    Rationalism, Sentimentalism, and Ralph Cudworth.Michael B. Gill - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (1):149-181.
    Moral rationalism is the view that morality originates in reason alone. It is often contrasted with moral sentimentalism, which is the view that the origin of morality lies at least partly in sentiment. The eighteenth century saw pitched philosophical battles between rationalists and sentimentalists, and the issue continues to fuel disputes among moral philosophers today.
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  41.  24
    Conjunctive and Disjunctive Concept Formation Under Equal-Information Conditions.Michael B. Conant & Tom Trabasso - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (3):250.
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  42.  64
    The Concrete Universal: Cook Wilson and Bosanquet.Michael B. Foster - 1931 - Mind 40 (157):1-22.
  43. Hume and Edwards on 'Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing?'.Michael B. Burke - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (4):355–362.
    Suppose that five minutes ago, to our astonishment, a healthy, full-grown duck suddenly popped into existence on the table in front of us. Suppose further that there was no first time at which the duck existed but rather a last time, T, at which it had yet to exist. Then for each time t at which the duck has existed, there is an explanation of why the duck existed at t: there was a time t’ earlier than t but later (...)
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  44.  15
    Photographic Art in Exam Rooms May Reduce White Coat Hypertension.Michael B. Harper, Stacy Kanayama-Trivedi, Gloria Caldito, David Montgomery, E. J. Mayeaux & Lourdes M. DelRosso - 2015 - Medical Humanities 41 (2):86-88.
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  45.  7
    Theoretical Commentary: The Role of Criterion Shift in False Memory.Michael B. Miller & George L. Wolford - 1999 - Psychological Review 106 (2):398-405.
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  46.  4
    Einführung.Michael B. Buchholz - 2018 - Paragrana: Internationale Zeitschrift für Historische Anthropologie 27 (1):233-236.
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  47.  96
    Moral Phenomenology in Hutcheson and Hume.Michael B. Gill - 2009 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (4):pp. 569-594.
    Moral phenomenology, as i will use the term in this paper, is the study of our experience of morality. It is the study of morality “as experienced from the first-person point of view,” 1 the study of the “what-it-is-like features of concrete moral experiences,” 2 the study of introspectively accessible features that can be discerned by “a direct examination of the data of men’s moral consciousness.” 3A crucial part of moral phenomenology is the study of what it is like to (...)
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  48.  50
    A Philosopher in His Closet: Reflexivity and Justification in Hume’s Moral Theory.Michael B. Gill - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):231-255.
    When a man of business enters into life and action, he is more apt to consider the characters of men, as they have relation to his interest, than as they stand in themselves; and has his judgement warped on every occasion by the violence of his passion. When a philosopher contemplates characters and manners in his closet, the general abstract view of the objects leaves the mind so cold and unmoved, that the sentiments of nature have no room to play, (...)
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  49.  21
    Re-Evaluating Age-of-Acquisition Effects: Are They Simply Cumulative-Frequency Effects?Michael B. Lewis, Simon Gerhand & Hadyn D. Ellis - 2001 - Cognition 78 (2):189-205.
  50.  25
    Immortals and Apple Bearers: Towards a Better Understanding of Achaemenid Infantry Units.Michael B. Charles - 2011 - Classical Quarterly 61 (1):114-133.
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