Results for 'magnanimity'

51 found
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  1. Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas on Magnanimity.Tobias Hoffmann - 2008 - In István Pieter Bejczy (ed.), Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages: Commentaries on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, 1200 -1500. Brill.
    Certain traits of the magnanimous man of the Nicomachean Ethics seem incompatible with gratitude and humility. Albert the Great and Thomas Aquinas are the first commentators of the Latin West who had access to the integral portrayal of magnanimity in the Nicomachean Ethics. Surprisingly, they welcomed the Aristotelian ideal of magnanimity without reservations. The paper summarizes Aristotle’s account of magnanimity, discusses briefly the transformation of this notion in Stoicism and early scholasticism, and analyzes Albert’s and Thomas’s interpretation (...)
     
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  2.  36
    Thomas Hobbes: Magnanimity, Felicity, and Justice.Andrew J. Corsa - 2013 - Hobbes Studies 26 (2):130-151.
    Thomas Hobbes’s concept of magnanimity, a descendant of Aristotle’s “greatness of soul,” plays a key role in Hobbes’s theory with respect to felicity and the virtue of justice. In his Critique du ‘De Mundo’, Hobbes implies that only genuinely magnanimous people can achieve the greatest felicity in their lives. A life of felicity is a life of pleasure, where the only pleasure that counts is the well grounded glory experienced by those who are magnanimous. Hobbes suggests that felicity involves (...)
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  3.  14
    Aquinas and the Challenge of Aristotelian Magnanimity.Mary Keys - 2003 - History of Political Thought 24 (1):37-65.
    This article revisits the account of magnanimity offered by Thomas Aquinas, in his Commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle and especially in his Summa Theologiae. Recent scholarship has viewed Aquinas' magnanimity as essentially Aristotle's, complemented by the addition of charity and humility to the classical moral horizon. By contrast, I read Aquinas as offering a subtle yet far-reaching critique of important aspects of Aristotelian magnanimity, a critique with roots in Aquinas' theology, yet also comprising a significant (...)
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  4.  83
    Magnanimity, Athletic Excellence, and Performance-Enhancing Drugs.Michael W. Austin - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):46-53.
    abstract In this paper, I first develop a neo-Aristotelian account of the virtue of magnanimity. I then apply this virtue to ethical issues that arise in sport, and argue that the magnanimous athlete will rightly use sport to foster her own moral development. I also address how the magnanimous athlete responds to the moral challenges present in sport by focusing on the issue of performance-enhancing drugs, and conclude that athletic excellence as it is conventionally understood, without moral excellence, has (...)
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  5.  26
    Some Developments in Aristotle's Conception of Magnanimity.Terence Irwin - 1999 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 11 (1):173 - 194.
    The treatment of magnanimity in Aristotle's three ethical works gives us an opportunity to compare his different discussions, and his different treatments of common-sense views and various ideals of magnanimity. Comparison of the three Ethics suggests that the Nichomaechean Ethics provides the latest and best treatment of this virtue.
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  6.  40
    Witherspoon, Edwards and 'Christian Magnanimity'.H. G. Callaway - 2011 - In K. P. Minkema, A. Neele & K. van Andel (eds.), Jonathan Edwards and Scotland. Dunedin Academic Press. pp. 117-128.
    This paper focuses on John Witherspoon (1723-1794) and the religious background of the American conception of religious liberty and church-state separation, as found in the First Amendment. Witherspoon was strongly influenced by debates and conflicts concerning liberty of conscience and the independence of the congregations in his native Scotland; and he brought to his work, as President of the (Presbyterian) College of New Jersey, a moderate Calvinism challenging the conception of “true virtue” found in Jonathan Edwards. Witherspoon was teacher to (...)
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  7.  7
    A Defense of Aristotelian Magnanimity Against the Pride Objection with the Help of Aquinas.Lindsay K. Cleveland - 2014 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 88:259-271.
    I defend a broadly Aristotelian account of the virtue of magnanimity against the objection that Aristotelian magnanimity is an expression of the vice of pride and so cannot be a virtue. I identify the essential features of magnanimity on Aristotle’s account and argue that Aquinas preserves these essential features while identifying additional necessary conditions of the virtue of magnanimity that illuminate the virtue and show it to be incompatible with pride. I also show where two other (...)
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  8.  12
    Delicate Magnanimity: Hume on the Advantages of Taste.Margaret Watkins - 2009 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (4):389 - 408.
    This article argues that Hume's brief essay, "Of the Delicacy of Taste and Passion," offers resources for three claims: (1) Delicate taste correlates with self-sufficiency and thus with a particularly Humean form of Magnanimity -- greatness of mind; (2) Delicate taste improves the capacity for profound friendships, characterized by mutual admiration and true compassion; and (3) magnanimity and compassion are thus not necessarily in tension with one another and may even proceed from and support harmony of character. These (...)
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  9. Magnanimity and Modernity: Self-Love in the Scottish Enlightenment.Ryan Patrick Hanley - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    David Hume and Adam Smith are often regarded as founding fathers of modern social science and champions of self-interested material acquisitiveness. Against this view I argue that their moral and political philosophies are better understood as modern installments in the classical tradition of virtue ethics. By focusing on Hume and Smith's conception of self-love and particularly on their distinction of self-love from self-interest, I demonstrate their dedication to encouraging virtues beyond the instrumental virtues of the market. ;Hume and Smith regard (...)
     
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  10. Magnanimity and Integrity as Military Virtues.Paul Robinson - 2007 - Journal of Military Ethics 6 (4):259-269.
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  11. Magnanimity, Mεγαλοψυχία, and the System of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Eckart Schütrumpf - 1989 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 71 (1):10-22.
  12.  3
    The Evolution of Magnanimity.James L. Boone - 1998 - Human Nature 9 (1):1-21.
    Conspicuous consumption associated with status reinforcement behavior can be explained in terms of costly signaling, or strategic handicap theory, first articulated by Zahavi and later formalized by Grafen. A theory is introduced which suggests that the evolutionary raison d’être of status reinforcement behavior lies not only in its effects on lifetime reproductive success, but in its positive effects on the probability of survival through infrequent, unpredictable demographic bottlenecks. Under some circumstances, such “wasteful” displays may take the form of displays of (...)
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  13. The Meaning of Aristotelian Magnanimity.Michael Pakaluk - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 26:241-75.
  14.  9
    4. The Strange Case of the Self-Dwarfing Man: Modernity, Magnanimity, and Thomas Aquinas.Michael Keating - 2007 - Logos 10 (4).
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  15.  6
    Scale and Magnanimity in Civic Liberalism.Gus diZerega - 2000 - Critical Review 15 (1-2):147-171.
    Abstract Thomas Spragens attempts to rebuild liberal theory by arguing that realist, libertarian, egalitarian, and identity liberals all have valid insights, but develop them one?sidedly. Re?examining the work of sixteenth? and seventeenth?century liberals leads, he contends, to a more balanced liberalism. Spragens's often?impressive effort to reconstruct liberalism is undermined by insufficient appreciation of the role of the scale of the polity and by confusions about civic friendship. Appreciation of Hayekian insights about spontaneous order, and of the limits of citizen knowledge (...)
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  16. Aristotle and Aquinas on Magnanimity.David A. Homer - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15:421.
     
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  17.  17
    The Magnanimity of "Wuthering Heights".Joyce Carol Oates - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (2):435-449.
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  18.  38
    "Magnanimity" in Aristotle's "Ethics".W. F. R. Hardie - 1978 - Phronesis 23 (1):63 - 79.
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    Socratic Magnanimity in the Phaedo.Michael Pakaluk - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):101-117.
  20.  21
    "Magnanimity" in Aristotle's Ethics.W. F. R. Hardie - 1978 - Phronesis 23 (1):63-79.
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    Magnanimity of Madhyamaka.Christian Lindtner - 1999 - Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 32:127-148.
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  22. Socratic Magnanimity in the Phaedo.Michael Pakaluk - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):101-117.
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  23.  47
    Modern Greatness of Soul in Hume and Smith.Andrew J. Corsa - 2015 - Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    I contend that Adam Smith and David Hume offer re-interpretations of Aristotle’s notion of greatness of soul, focusing on the kind of magnanimity Aristotle attributes to Socrates. Someone with Socratic magnanimity is worthy of honor, responds moderately to fortune, and is virtuous—just and benevolent. Recent theorists err in claiming that magnanimity is less important to Hume’s account of human excellence than benevolence. In fact, benevolence is a necessary ingredient for the best sort of greatness. Smith’s “Letter to (...)
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  24.  28
    Henry David Thoreau: Greatness of Soul and Environmental Virtue.Andrew J. Corsa - 2015 - Environmental Philosophy 12 (2):161-184.
    I read Henry David Thoreau as an environmental virtue theorist. In this paper, I use Thoreau’s work as a tool to explore the relation between the virtue of greatness of soul and environmental virtues. Reflecting on connections between Thoreau’s texts and historical discussions of greatness of soul, or magnanimity, I offer a novel conception of magnanimity. I argue that (1) to become magnanimous, most individuals need to acquire the environmental virtue of simplicity; and (2) magnanimous individuals must possess (...)
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  25.  3
    Modern Liberalism and Pride: An Augustinian Perspective.Michael P. Krom - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):453-477.
    In "Toward an Augustinian Liberalism," Paul Weithman argues that modern liberal institutions should be concerned with the political vice of pride as a threat to the neutral, legitimate use of public power that liberalism demands. By directing our attention to pride, Weithman attempts to provide an incentive to and foundation for an Augustinian liberalism that can counteract this threat. While Weithman is right to point to the centrality of pride in understanding the modern liberal tradition, an investigation of the early (...)
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  26. The Virtues of Honorable Business Executives.Dan Demetriou - 2013 - In Mike Austin (ed.), Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 29-38.
    Although most cultures have held honorableness to be a virtue of the first importance, contemporary analytic ethicists have just begun to consider honor’s nature and ethical worth. In this essay, I provide an analysis of the honor ethos and apply it to business ethics. Applying honor to business may appear to be a particularly challenging task, since (for reasons I discuss) honor has traditionally been seen as incompatible with commerce. Nonetheless, I argue here that two of the central virtues of (...)
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  27.  23
    Thoreau Among His Heroes.Ryan Patrick Hanley - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):59-74.
    For a book that implores its readers to “simplify, simplify,” Walden has more than its fair share of obscurity. Lovers of simplicity have long mined it for its clear and comforting maxims, only to leave behind more than a few tough nuts for those who incline towards the esoteric—which, for Thoreau, is the essence of the philosophical. To the former set of readers he offers an apology: “You will pardon some obscurities, for there are more secrets in my trade than (...)
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  28. An Ancient Virtue and Its Heirs: The Reception of Greatness of Soul in the Arabic Tradition.Sophia Vasalou - 2017 - Journal of Religious Ethics 45 (4):688-731.
    This essay examines the reception of the ancient virtue of greatness of soul in the Arabic tradition, touching on a range of figures but focusing especially on Miskawayh and even more concertedly on al-Ghazālī. Influenced by a number of Greek ethical texts available in Arabic translation, both of these thinkers incorporate greatness of soul into their classifications of the virtues and the vices. Yet a closer scrutiny raises questions about this amicable inclusion, and suggests that this virtue stands in an (...)
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  29.  16
    Adam Smith and the Character of Virtue.Ryan Patrick Hanley - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    The problem : commerce and corruption -- Smith's defense of commercial society -- What is corruption? : political and psychological perspectives -- Smith on corruption : from the citizen to the human being -- The solution : moral philosophy -- Liberal individualism and virtue ethics -- Social science vs. moral philosophy -- Types of moral philosophy : natural jurisprudence vs. ethics -- Types of ethics : utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics -- Virtue ethics : modern, ancient, and Smithean -- Interlude (...)
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  30. Non-Coercive Promotion of Values in Civic Education for Democracy.A. Fives - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (6):577-590.
    This article explores the values that should be promoted in civic education for democracy and also how the promotion of values can be non-coercive. It will be argued that civic education should promote the values of reasonableness, mutual respect and fairness, but also that only public, political reasons count in attempting to justify the content of civic education. It will also be argued that the content of civic education may legitimately be broader than this, including but not restricted to the (...)
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  31.  29
    The Virtues (and Vices) of the Four Principles.A. V. Campbell - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (5):292-296.
    Despite tendencies to compete for a prime place in moral theory, neither virtue ethics nor the four principles approach should claim to be superior to, or logically prior to, the other. Together they provide a more adequate account of the moral life than either can offer on its own. The virtues of principlism are clarity, simplicity and (to some extent) universality. These are well illustrated by Ranaan Gillon’s masterly analysis of the cases he has provided. But the vices of this (...)
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  32.  95
    Social Morality and Individual Ideal.P. F. Strawson - 1961 - Philosophy 36 (136):1 - 17.
    Men make for themselves pictures of ideal forms of life. Such pictures are various and may be in sharp opposition to each other; and one and the same individual may be captivated by different and sharply conflicting pictures at different times. At one time it may seem to him that he should live—even that a man should live —in such-and-such a way; at another that the only truly satisfactory form of life is something totally different, incompatible with the first. In (...)
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  33.  37
    What It Takes to Be Great.David A. Horner - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (4):415-444.
    The revival of virtue ethics is largely inspired by Aristotle, but few---especially Christians---follow him in seeing virtue supremely exemplified in the “magnanimous” man. However, Aristotle raises a matter of importance: the character traits and type of psychological stance exemplified in those who aspire to acts of extraordinary excellence. I explore the accounts of magnanimity found in both Aristotle and Aquinas, defending the intelligibility and acceptability of some central elements of a broadly Aristotelian conception of magnanimity. Aquinas, I argue, (...)
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  34.  15
    Aristotle on the Greatness of Greatness of Soul.R. Hanley - 2002 - History of Political Thought 23 (1):1-20.
    Magnanimity is often regarded as the heroic virtue of glory-seeking warriors and honour-loving aristocrats. But in the Nicomachean Ethics Aristotle presents magnanimity as a civic rather than a heroic virtue. By attending to Aristotle's often overlooked accounts of his indifference to honour and his attitudes towards fortune and towards others, I aim to show that so far from seeking only glory or self-sufficiency, the magnanimous man realizes his true greatness and nobility in his beneficence towards his fellow citizens.
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  35. Humility.James Kellenberger - 2010 - American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (4):321-336.
    Humility has not always been regarded as a virtue. Aristotle, if he recognized it at all, seems to have regarded it as a vice, a deficiency in regard to magnanimity. In the popular culture of the twenty-first century, while courage is held in high moral esteem, the regard given to humility is more questionable. Humility, however, is not universally dismissed as a virtue. Many see it as having moral value. In fact, a number of contemporary philosophers are relatively clear (...)
     
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  36.  45
    Aquinas's Virtues of Acknowledged Dependence: A New Measure of Greatness.Rebecca DeYoung - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (2):214-227.
    This paper compares Aristotle’s and Aquinas’s accounts of the virtue of magnanimity specifically as a corrective to the vice of pusillanimity. After definingpusillanimity and underscoring key features of Aristotelian magnanimity, I explain how Aquinas’s account of Christian magnanimity, by making humandependence on God fundamental to this virtue, not only clarifies the differences between the vice of pusillanimity and the virtue of humility, but also showswhy only Christian magnanimity can free us from improper and damaging forms of (...)
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  37.  27
    Generosity as a Central Virtue in Nietzsche's Ethics.Marinus Schoeman - 2007 - South African Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):17-30.
    Nietzsche's ethics is basically an ethics of virtue. In his own unique way, and in accordance with his extra-moral view of life, Nietzsche recovers and re-appropriates certain virtues – notably pagan, aristocratic virtues – as part of his project to reconceptualise (‘rehabilitate') the virtues in terms of virtù (virtuosity and vitality), to which he also refers as his ‘moraline-free' conception of the virtues. The virtue of generosity (in the sense of magnanimity) plays a central role in Nietzschean ethics. According (...)
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  38.  82
    The Thinker as a Noble Man (Bene Natus) and Preliminary Remarks on the Medieval Concepts of Nobility.Andrea A. Robiglio - 2006 - Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):205-247.
    The late medieval discussion of 'nobility' (= nobilitas, dignitas) defined in philosophical terms (as opposed to other social notions like 'aristocracy'), produced a large number of writings, many of which are still unedited. Nevertheless, modern philosophical historiography (developed throughout the seventeenth century and reaching its first apogee with Hegel) has neglected the conceptual debates on nobility. Perhaps having assumed it to be a dead relic of the 'pre-illuminist' past, historians and philosophers understood 'nobility' as a non-philosophical issue and so it (...)
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  39.  20
    Passion and Intelligibility in Spiritual Education.Mike Radford - 2007 - British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (1):21-36.
    David Carr argues that the intelligibility of spiritual development as an educational activity is dependent upon there being a framework of propositions that relates to spiritual experience and that there is a methodology for establishing their truth. These propositions and the accompanying methodology need to be constructed along the lines of a traditional but re-worked form of religious education. Michael Hand argues to the contrary that there can be no methodology for the evaluation of the truth claims in relation to (...)
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  40.  3
    Modern Liberalism and Pride an Augustinian Perspective.Michael P. Krom - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):453-477.
    In "Toward an Augustinian Liberalism," Paul Weithman argues that modern liberal institutions should be concerned with the political vice of pride as a threat to the neutral, legitimate use of public power that liberalism demands. By directing our attention to pride, Weithman attempts to provide an incentive to and foundation for an Augustinian liberalism that can counteract this threat. While Weithman is right to point to the centrality of pride in understanding the modern liberal tradition, an investigation of the early (...)
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  41.  28
    Michael W. Austin, Ed. Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics.Mark Alfano - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (2):457-462.
    This ain’t your grandma’s virtue theory.In Michael Austin’s bold new collection, Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics, gone are the pretentions of defining right action generically as what a virtuous person would do in the circumstances, while acting in and from character, provided that a virtuous person would end up in those circumstances. Instead, we find detailed explorations of specific virtues and vices related to specific fields of activity and problems, with attention (some of it careful – (...)
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  42.  45
    The Complexity of Justice - a Challenge to the 21st Century.Agnes Heller - 2000 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (3):247-262.
    The author discusses two questions, the relation between liberalism and democracy, and the relation between ethics, morality and law. As to the first question, she argues that neither liberalism nor democracy are merely formal. Roughly spoken, it can be said that liberalism stands for negative liberties, whereas democracy stands for positive ones. She observes a non-contingent tension between the ethos of liberalism (personal freedom) and the ethos of democracy (equality; majority rule). It is the task of morality to maintain and (...)
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  43.  13
    The Truth-Value of the Aristotelian 'Areti'.Ioanna Patsioti-Tsacpounidis - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:165-172.
    This paper examines the concept of ‘areti’ as encountered in the Aristotelian ethical system in order to establish its relationship to the modern concept of virtue as well as to that of moral truth, that is, to identify its truth-value. I intend to show that the Aristotelian ‘areti’ as a developed state of character and as an advanced stage of ethical understanding entails moral truth. ‘Areti’ as a good-in-itself possesses an intrinsic value which reflects moral truth, and as a means (...)
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  44.  13
    Aristotle on Ambition.P. Nieuwenburg - 2010 - History of Political Thought 31 (4):533-555.
    The Nicomachean Ethics is the only ethical work by Aristotle that recognizes ambition as a distinct virtue. Because of its connection with the Politics, it is tempting to conjecture that there might be a specifically 'political' reason for including ambition in the Nicomachean Ethics. However, what he has to say about it is disappointing. It is not clear how we are to conceive of the virtue and its relation to other virtues of character, notably the other honour-related virtue of (...). The aim of this article is to give an account of ambition and its relationship to magnanimity, while taking into account (1) Aristotle's commitment to the doctrine of the reciprocity of the virtues in Nicomachean Ethics 6 and (2) its link with the Politics. (shrink)
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  45.  5
    The Formal Beauty of the Hercvles Fvrens.J. T. Sheppard - 1916 - Classical Quarterly 10 (02):72-.
    Many critics have condemned, some have defended, Euripides for composing a play ‘altogether wanting in the satisfaction which nothing but a unity of ideas could produce.’ It helps us little to marvel, with Paley, at the ‘obtuseness of critics who forsooth prefer “unity of ideas” to profoundly moving incidents, etc.,’ though it may be admitted that Paley has detected part of the truth when he calls attention to the importance of the fact that Athens is, throughout the play, the only (...)
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  46.  4
    Decision-Making in Organisations, According to the Aristotelian Model.F. Torralba & C. Palazzi - 2010 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):109.
    One field in ethics that has been developed during recent decades is virtue ethics, represented most importantly by Alasdair MacIntyre's work After Virtue. Virtue ethics is not opposed to principle-based ethics, but rather complements its task and develops it more fully. In the field of US bioethics, this option has proved to be even more fruitful, especially in the work of Edmund Pellegrino and David Thomasma. Virtue ethics is also being reappraised in relation to the ethics of organisations and business. (...)
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  47. Kantian Virtue as Cure for Affects and Passions: Série 2.Maria Borges - 2009 - Kant E-Prints 4:267-283.
    : In the Critique of Practical Reason, Kant presents virtue not as an arduous task, but as an endeavor, that costs a lot for the agent. In order to explain in what consists moral content, Kant tells a story of an honest man, to whom it is offered great gifts if he joins the calumniators of an innocent person, but he denies it. Then he is threatened by his friends, who deny him friendship, by his relatives, who deny him inheritance, (...)
     
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  48. Abraham Lincoln, Philosopher Statesman.Joseph R. Fornieri - 2014 - Southern Illinois University Press.
    The political genius of Abraham Lincoln remains unequivocal. As a great leader, he saved the Union, presided over the end of slavery, and helped to pave the way for an interracial democracy. In his speeches and letters, he offered enduring wisdom about human equality, democracy, free labor, and free society. This rare combination of theory and practice in politics cemented Lincoln’s legacy as one of the most talented statesmen in American history. Providing an accessible framework for understanding Lincoln’s statesmanship, this (...)
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  49. The Second-Person Perspective in Aquinas’s Ethics: Virtues and Gifts.Andrew Pinsent - 2013 - Routledge.
    Thomas Aquinas devoted a substantial proportion of his greatest works to the virtues. Yet, despite the availability of these texts, Aquinas’s virtue ethics remains mysterious, leaving readers with many unanswered questions. In this book, Pinsent argues that the key to understanding Aquinas’s approach is to be found in an association between: a) attributes he appends to the virtues, and b) interpersonal capacities investigated by the science of social cognition, especially in the context of autistic spectrum disorder. The book uses this (...)
     
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  50. Decision-Making in Organisations, According to the Aristotelian Model.Francesc Torralba Roselló & Cristian Palazzi - 2010 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):109-120.
    One field in ethics that has been developed during recent decades is virtue ethics, represented most importantly by Alasdair MacIntyre's work After Virtue. Virtue ethics is not opposed to principle-based ethics, but rather complements its task and develops it more fully. In the field of US bioethics, this option has proved to be even more fruitful, especially in the work of Edmund Pellegrino and David Thomasma. Virtue ethics is also being reappraised in relation to the ethics of organisations and business. (...)
     
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