Results for 'I. Lorraine Heisler'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Alternative formulations of multilevel selection.John Damuth & I. Lorraine Heisler - 1988 - Biology and Philosophy 3 (4):407-430.
    Hierarchical expansions of the theory of natural selection exist in two distinct bodies of thought in evolutionary biology, the group selection and the species selection traditions. Both traditions share the point of view that the principles of natural selection apply at levels of biological organization above the level of the individual organism. This leads them both to considermultilevel selection situations, where selection is occurring simultaneously at more than one level. Impeding unification of the theoretical approaches of the multilevel selection traditions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   127 citations  
  2.  21
    Contrasting effects of feature-based statistics on the categorisation and basic-level identification of visual objects.Kirsten I. Taylor, Barry J. Devereux, Kadia Acres, Billi Randall & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):363-374.
  3.  14
    Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750.Lorraine Daston - 1998 - Zone Books.
    Wonders and the Order of Nature is about the ways in which European naturalists from the High Middle Ages through the Enlightenment used wonder and wonders, the passion and its objects, to envision themselves and the natural world. Monsters, gems that shone in the dark, petrifying springs, celestial apparitions---these were the marvels that adorned romances, puzzled philosophers, lured collectors, and frightened the devout. Drawing on the histories of art, science, philosophy, and literature, Lorraine Daston and Katharine Park explore and (...)
    No categories
  4. Alvin I. Goldman, Epistemology and Cognition. [REVIEW]Lorraine Code - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8:398-401.
  5. Alvin I. Goldman, Epistemology and Cognition Reviewed by.Lorraine Code - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8 (10):398-401.
  6. Conceptual structure.Helen E. Moss, Lorraine K. Tyler & Taylor & I. Kirsten - 2009 - In Gareth Gaskell (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Psycholinguistics. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. The metaphysics of propositional constituency.Lorraine Keller - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (5-6):655-678.
    In this paper, I criticize Structured Propositionalism, the most widely held theory of the nature of propositions according to which they are structured entities with constituents. I argue that the proponents of Structured Propositionalism have paid insufficient attention to the metaphysical presuppositions of the view – most egregiously, to the notion of propositional constituency. This is somewhat ironic, since the friends of structured propositions tend to argue as if the appeal to constituency gives their view a dialectical advantage. I criticize (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  8.  6
    I Ching: An Annotated Bibliography.Edward A. Hacker, Steve Moore & Lorraine Patsco (eds.) - 2002 - Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Against Naturalized Cognitive Propositions.Lorraine Keller - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (4):929-946.
    In this paper, I argue that Scott Soames’ theory of naturalized cognitive propositions faces a serious objection: there are true propositions for which NCP cannot account. More carefully, NCP cannot account for certain truths of mathematics unless it is possible for there to be an infinite intellect. For those who reject the possibility of an infinite intellect, this constitutes a reductio of NCP.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10.  77
    What propositional structure could not be.Lorraine Keller - 2019 - Synthese 196 (4):1529-1553.
    The dominant account of propositions holds that they are structured entities that have, as constituents, the semantic values of the constituents of the sentences that express them. Since such theories hold that propositions are structured, in some sense, like the sentences that express them, they must provide an answer to what I will call Soames’ Question: “What level, or levels, of sentence structure does semantic information incorporate?”. As it turns out, answering Soames’ Question is no easy task. I argue in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  46
    Divine Ineffability and Franciscan Knowledge.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2018 - Res Philosophica 95 (3):347-370.
    There’s been a recent surge of interest among analytic philosophers of religion in divine ineffability. However, divine ineffability is part of a traditional conception of God that has been widely rejected among analytic philosophers of religion for the past few decades. One of the main reasons that the traditional conception of God has been rejected is because it allegedly makes God too remote, unknowable, and impersonal. In this paper, I present an account of divine ineffability that directly addresses this concern (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  12.  5
    The Philosophical I: Personal Reflections on Life in Philosophy.Nicholas Rescher, Richard Shusterman, Linda Martín Alcoff, Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding, Bat-Ami Bar On, John Lachs, John J. Stuhr, Douglas Kellner, Thomas E. Wartenberg, Paul C. Taylor, Nancey Murphy, Charles W. Mills, Nancy Tuana & Joseph Margolis - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Philosophy is shaped by life and life is shaped by philosophy. This is reflected in The Philosophical I, a collection of 16 autobiographical essays by prominent philosophers.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  74
    Marvelous Facts and Miraculous Evidence in Early Modern Europe.Lorraine Daston - 1991 - Critical Inquiry 18 (1):93-124.
    I have sketched the well-known distinction between facts and evidence not to defend or attack it , but rather as a preface to a key episode in the history of the conceptual categories of fact and evidence. My question is neither, “Do neutral facts exist?” nor “How does evidence prove or disprove?” but rather, “How did our current conceptions of neutral facts and enlisted evidence, and the distinction between them, come to be?” How did evidence come to be incompatible with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  14.  26
    Propositions Supernaturalized.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2018 - In Jerry L. Walls & Trent Dougherty (eds.), Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for God. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 11-28.
    The Theistic Argument from Intentionality (TAI) is a venerable argument for the existence of God from the existence of eternal truths. The argument relies, inter alia, on the premises that (i) truth requires representation, and that (ii) non-derivative representation is a function of, and only of, minds. If propositions are the fundamental bearers of truth and falsity, then these premises entail that propositions (or at least their representational properties) depend on minds. Although it is widely thought that psychologism—the view that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  54
    Which Way Down the Slippery Slope: Arkangel or Digital Pacifier?Lorraine K. C. Yeung - 2022 - Film and Philosophy 26:41-53.
    The Black Mirror episode “Arkangel” tells a disturbing story of over-parenting driven by technology. The single mother Marie’s adoption of the Arkangel system has invited overwhelmingly negative moral evaluation from philosophers. But what accounts for the moral failure of a loving and concerned parent? Is it all about her flawed character, or are there situational factors at work? In the article, I first foreground the slipperiness of technology implicated in Albert Borgmann’s notion of the “device paradigm” and Hans Jonas’s analysis (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  26
    Virtue of Self-Regulation.Lorraine Besser - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (3):505-517.
    This paper proposes the idea of thinking about practical rationality in terms of self-regulation and defends the thesis that self-regulation is a virtue, insofar as we have reason to think it is our highest form of practical rationality. I argue that understanding self-regulation as a virtuous form of practical reasoning is called for given the kinds of limitations we face in developing agency and pursuing our goals, and presents us with several advantages over traditional understandings of practical rationality.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17. The ethical professor: a practical guide to research, teaching and professional life.Lorraine Eden - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Introduction -- Ethics and research -- Twenty questions : ethical research dilemmas and PHD students -- Research pitfalls for new entrants to the academy -- Scientists behaving badly: insights from the fraud triangle -- Slicing and dicing : ex ante approaches -- Slicing and dicing : ex post approaches -- Retraction : mistake or misconduct? -- Double-blind review in the age of google and powerpoint -- Ethics in research scenarios : what would you do? -- Thought leader : Michael A. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Why literary devices matter.Lorraine K. C. Yeung - 2021 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 60 (1):19-37.
    This paper investigates the emotional import of literary devices deployed in fiction. Reflecting on the often-favored approach in the analytic tradition that locates fictional characters, events, and narratives as sources of readers’ emotions, I attempt to broaden the scope of analysis by accounting for how literary devices trigger non-cognitive emotions. I argue that giving more expansive consideration to literary devices by which authors present content facilitates a better understanding of how fiction engages emotion. In doing so, I also explore the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. The Power Of Ignorance.Lorraine Code - 2004 - Philosophical Papers 33 (3):291-308.
    Abstract Taking my point of entry from George Eliot's reference to ?the power of Ignorance?, I analyse some manifestations of that power as she portrays it in the life of a young woman of affluence, in her novel Daniel Deronda. Comparing and contrasting this kind of ignorance with James Mill's avowed ignorance of local tradition and custom in his History of British India, I consider how ignorance can foster immoral beliefs which, in turn, contribute to social-political arrangements of dominance and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  20.  2
    From the Outside Looking In: One Woman's Acimowin.Lorraine Mayer - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):214-219.
    I struggle mamereTo bringYour wordsInto nokum'sCabinBut the wordsAre in battleCompetingfor my mindI am a mixed-blood woman raised in Canada where my two ancestries have competing worldviews, from social, political, and religious ideology to ancient philosophies. These mixed ancestries also come with different social expectations. In the social-political world of Native Studies where I walk daily, my French grandmother, mamere, is argued as coming from a world of privilege because she was white-skinned, and my Cree grandmother, nokum is thought to come (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. The Nature of Horror Reconsidered.Lorraine Yeung - 2018 - International Philosophical Quarterly 58 (2):125-138.
    There is a growing interest in the role of non-cognitive affective responses in the philosophical literature on fiction and emotion. This flurry of scholarly interest is partly a reaction to cognitivist accounts of fiction and emotion that have been found to be inadequate. The inadequacy is particularly salient when this approach is employed to account for narrative horror. Cognitivist conceptions of the emotion engendered by narrative horror prove to be too restrictive. Cognitivist accounts also fail to give the formal devices (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. A Return to Reciprocity.Lorraine F. Mayer - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):22-42.
    Feminist affiliation has long been suspect among Native American women whose memories survive the dishonor of colonialism. The idea of common struggles is simultaneously repugnant and alluring. Sadly, this has led to much confusion and rejection between Aboriginal women. I suggest “a return to reciprocity” to understand and come to terms with feminist rejection or affiliation. If we cannot come together, the fracturing that began with European ideology will continue to fragment and destroy the fabric of Native cultures.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  46
    How to Think Globally: Stretching the Limits of Imagination.Lorraine Code - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (2):73 - 85.
    Here I discuss some epistemological questions posed by projects of attempting to think globally, in light of the impossibility of affirming universal sameness. I illustrate one strategy for embarking on such a project, ecologically, in a reading of an essay by Chandra Talpade Mohanty. And I conclude by suggesting that the North/South border between Canada and the U.S.A. generates underacknowledged issues of cultural alterity.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  24. Propositions without parts.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2022 - In Chris Tillman & Adam Murray (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Propositions.
    This paper is a defense of what I call The Simple View, according to which propositions are simple, fine-grained, abstract entities that have truth-conditions essentially and fundamentally. The Simple View has two controversial implications: (i) propositions do not (literally) have constituents or parts, and (ii) propositions’ having truth-conditions is a brute fact about them. I criticize the Simple View’s two competitors, the Possible Worlds View and the Structured View, for failing to provide a plausible ontology of propositions and failing to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Saying Nothing and Thinking Nothing.Lorraine Juliano Keller - 2021 - In Sara Bernstein & Tyron Goldschmidt (eds.), Non-Being: New Essays on the Metaphysics of Nonexistence.
    Lapsing into nonsense is an occupational hazard of philosophy. But, unless they’ve been drinking, the sort of nonsense that philosophers are liable to lapse into is (usually) not pure gibberish—rather, it’s nonsense that often has the illusion of making sense. Such nonsense is sometimes accompanied by what Gareth Evans (1982) called “illusions of thought”: cognitive events that seem to have content, but don’t. In this paper we defend the existence of deceptive nonsense and illusions of thought by (i) providing positive (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  15
    A Return to Reciprocity.Lorraine F. Mayer - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):22-42.
    Feminist affiliation has long been suspect among Native American women whose memories survive the dishonor of colonialism. The idea of common struggles is simultaneously repugnant and alluring. Sadly, this has led to much confusion and rejection between Aboriginal women. I suggest “a return to reciprocity” to understand and come to terms with feminist rejection or affiliation. If we cannot come together, the fracturing that began with European ideology will continue to fragment and destroy the fabric of Native cultures.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27. What Is Natural about Epistemology Naturalized?Lorraine Code - 1996 - American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):1 - 22.
    I evaluate post-Quinean naturalized epistemology as a resource for postcolonial and feminist epistemology. I argue that naturalistic inquiry into material conditions and institutions of knowledge production has most to offer epistemologists committed to maintaining continuity with the knowledge production of specifically located knowers. Yet naturalistic denigrations of folk epistemic practices and stereotyped, hence often oppressive, readings of human nature challenge the naturalness of the nature they claim to study. I outline an ecologically modelled epistemology that focuses on questions of epistemic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  28.  35
    Ideas of self and community: Ethical implications for a communitarian conception of moral autonomy.Lorraine Kasprisin - 1996 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (1):41-49.
    This paper attempts to construct a concept of moral autonomy thai is compatible with a relationally-based or care-based ethical theory. After critiquing the traditional liberal identification of the ethical self with an abstract rational self detached from community and historical narrative, I argue that the ethical self emerges in a dialectical relation with the community itself. Essentially, I argue for a concept of autonomy that will be analyzed as a critical perspective from within a community rather than as a privileged (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  15
    Dewey, Foucault, and the Value of Horror: Transformative Learning through Reading Horror Fiction.Lorraine K. C. Yeung - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (2):75-93.
    This article advances an account of the nonhedonic values of horror fiction (including film). It is motivated by cases in which consuming horror fosters what theorists of education call "transformative learning" in adult students, which is a more shocking and disturbing experience than pleasurable. I first present two cases in which Polanski's Repulsion (1968) and Browning's Freaks (1932) disrupted and modified two students' experience of madness and abnormality respectively. Then I draw on Dewey's "aesthetic experience", Foucault's "experience book" and O'Leary's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  42
    Pleasure: 'The Choice of Hercules'.Lorraine Marie Arangno - 2013 - The European Legacy 18 (2):197-208.
    In this article I contend that John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism has been widely misunderstood, and hence the importance of his philosophical project has been diminished. This misunderstanding arises primarily from misconceptions regarding Mill's definition of pleasure. However, these misconceptions may be successfully resolved by reflecting on Mill's educational roots and his commitment to Greco-Roman philosophy. In particular, I hold that a deeper understanding of Mill's philosophical progenitors (i.e., Aristotle and Epicurus) would lead us to conclude that for Mill the 'pleasures' (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  48
    Feature Statistics Modulate the Activation of Meaning During Spoken Word Processing.Barry J. Devereux, Kirsten I. Taylor, Billi Randall, Jeroen Geertzen & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):325-350.
    Understanding spoken words involves a rapid mapping from speech to conceptual representations. One distributed feature-based conceptual account assumes that the statistical characteristics of concepts’ features—the number of concepts they occur in and likelihood of co-occurrence —determine conceptual activation. To test these claims, we investigated the role of distinctiveness/sharedness and correlational strength in speech-to-meaning mapping, using a lexical decision task and computational simulations. Responses were faster for concepts with higher sharedness, suggesting that shared features are facilitatory in tasks like lexical decision (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Dynamics of Moral Realism.Lorraine Marie Arangno - 1994 - Dissertation, University of Colorado at Boulder
    Ethical naturalists, who reject strong reductivist positions, hold a plausible theory that is a version of realism. In the thesis I provide a critical response to the skeptical attacks levied against these ethical naturalists. In particular, I examine the criticisms that J. L. Mackie and Simon Blackburn have put forward concerning the ethical naturalist's treatment of the concept of supervenience. I argue that the naturalist's position on supervenience can be defended against these criticisms.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Niwî-'totên nikiskinwaham'kosiwin.Lorraine Mayer - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (1):177-182.
    I am a mixed blood woman raised in Canada with two ancestries, Ininiwak and French, that have competing worldviews from social-political and religious ideology to ancient philosophies. These mixed ancestries set me on numerous paths, ultimately leading me to philosophy. However, when did this path begin? No one in my immediate family entertained ideas of education, so I had no guidance or understanding of what university would mean. I came from an ancestry of hardworking men considered to be lower-class French (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  14
    The Probabilistic Revolution, Volume 1.Lorenz Krüger, Lorraine J. Daston & Michael Heidelberger (eds.) - 1987 - Mit Press: Cambridge.
    Preface to Volumes 1 and 2 Lorenz Krüger xv Introduction to Volume 1 Lorraine J. Daston 1 I Revolution 1 What Are Scientific Revolutions? Thomas S. Kuhn 7 2 Scientific Revolutions, Revolutions in Science, and a Probabilistic Revolution 1800-1930 I. Bernard Cohen 23 3 Was There a Probabilistic Revolution 1800-1930? Ian Hacking 45 II Concepts 4 The Slow Rise of Probabilism: Philosophical Arguments in the Nineteenth Century Lorenz Krüger 59 5 The Decline of the Laplacian Theory of Probability: A (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  35. Against Nature; By Lorraine Daston. [REVIEW]Kyle Johannsen - 2021 - Between the Species 24 (1):140-4.
    Lorraine Daston's "Against Nature" seeks to explain why, in spite of compelling objections to the contrary, human beings continue to invest nature with moral authority. More specifically, she claims that our propensity to moralize nature is traceable in part to human nature. Though I criticize Daston for not paying adequate attention to John Stuart Mill's narrow sense of 'nature', I also highly recommend her book.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  15
    Beyond the 'french Fries and the frankfurter': An agenda for critical theory.Lorraine Y. Landry - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (2):99-129.
    Debates between Habermas and the poststructuralists - specifically, Derrida, Foucault and Lyotard - over the nature of critiques of Enlightenment rationality and modernity are investigated in order to argue for an agenda for critical theory beyond the 'French Fries and the Frankfurter'.1 Part I interrogates key elements of Habermas' theory of communicative rationality in his reconstruction of Enlightenment modernity and his critique of the poststructuralists. This orients the discussion toward an evaluation of Habermas' neo-Kantianism, theory of language (discourse ethics), and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  67
    Care, Concern, and Advocacy: Is There a Place for Epistemic Responsibility?Lorraine Code - 2015 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 1 (1):1-20.
    Departing from an epistemological tradition for which knowledge properly achieved must be objective, especially in eschewing affect and/or special interests; and against a backdrop of my thinking about epistemic responsibility, I focus on two situations where care informs and enables good knowing. The implicit purpose of this reclamation of care as epistemically vital is to show emphatically that standard alignments of care with femininity—the female—are simply misguided. Proposing that the efficacy of epistemic practices is often enhanced when would-be knowers care (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  52
    Responsibility and Rhetoric.Lorraine Code - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (1):1 - 20.
    In this paper I offer a retrospective rereading of my work on epistemic responsibility in order to see why this inquiry has found only an uneasy location within the discourse of Anglo-American epistemology. I trace the history of the work's production, circulation and reception, and examine the feminist implications of the discussions it has occasioned.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39. Sometimes an Orgasm is Just an Orgasm.Erika Lorraine Milam, Gillian R. Brown, Stefan Linquist, Steve Fuller & Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 2006 - Metascience 15 (3):399-435.
    I should like to offer my greatest thanks to Paul Griffiths for providing the opportunity for this exchange, and to commentators Gillian Brown, Steven Fuller, Stefan Linquist, and Erika Milam for their generous and thought-provoking comments. I shall do my best in this space to respond to some of their concerns.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40.  13
    Probability and Statistics in Historical PerspectiveThe Probabilistic Revolution. Volume I: Ideas in History. Lorenz Kruger, Lorraine J. Daston, Michael HeidelbergerThe Probabilistic Revolution. Volume II: Ideas in Science. Lorenz Kruger, Gerd Gigerenzer, Mary S. MorganClassical Probability in the Enlightenment. Lorraine J. Daston. [REVIEW]Donald MacKenzie - 1989 - Isis 80 (1):116-124.
  41.  38
    An Ecology of Epistemic Authority.Lorraine Code - 2011 - Episteme 8 (1):24-37.
    I offer an examination of trust relations in scientific inquiry as they seem to contrast with a lack of trust in an example of knowledge imposed from above by an unaccountable institutional power structure. On this basis I argue for a re-reading of John Hardwig's account of the place of trust in knowledge, and suggest that it translates less well than social epistemologists and others have assumed into a model for democratic epistemic practice.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. A New Epistemology of Rape?1.Lorraine Code - 2009 - Philosophical Papers 38 (3):327-345.
    In this essay I take issue with entrenched conceptions of individual autonomy for how they block understandings of the implications of rape in patriarchal cultures both 'at home' and in situations of armed conflict. I focus on human vulnerability as it manifests in sedimented assumptions about violence against women as endemic to male-female relations, thwarting possibilities of knowing the specific harms particular acts of rape enact well enough to render intelligible their far-reaching social-political-moral implications. Taking my point of departure from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  22
    The Tyranny of Certainty.Lorraine Code - 2017 - Symposium 21 (1):206-218.
    In this essay I explore some implications and effects of taken-for-granted expectations of achieved certainty as the only legitimate outcome of scientific and everyday inquiry. The analysis contrasts ubiquitous if often tacit expectations of certainty with a critique of how these very expectations can truncate productive engagement with matters ecological. The discussion focuses on the limited prospects of success in inquiry when certainty is the only putatively acceptable outcome, and it defends the value of situated quests for knowledge with their (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. The motivational state of the virtuous agent.Lorraine Besser-Jones - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):93 - 108.
    Julia Annas argues that Aristotle's understanding of the phenomenological experience of the virtuous agent corresponds to psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's concept of the ?flow,? which is a form of intrinsic motivation. In this paper, I explore whether or not Annas? understanding of virtuous agency is a plausible one. After a thorough analysis of psychological accounts of intrinsic and extrinsic states of motivation, I argue that despite the attractiveness of Annas? understanding of virtuous agency, it is subject to a serious problem: all (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45.  49
    Ecological Naturalism: Epistemic Responsibility and the Politics of Knowledge.Lorraine Code - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):87-102.
    The thesis of this paper is, first, that ecological thinking—which takes its point of departure from specifically located, multifaceted analyses of knowledge production and circulation in diverse demographic and geographic locations—can generate more responsible knowings than the reductivism of the positivist post-Enlightenment legacy allows; and second, that ecological thinking can spark a revolution comparable to Kant’s Copernican revolution, which recentered western thought by moving “man” to the center of the philosophical-conceptual universe. Kantian philosophy was parochial in the conception of “man” (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. The Role of Justice in Hume’s Theory of Psychological Development.Lorraine Besser-Jones - 2006 - Hume Studies 32 (2):253-276.
    Hume’s theory of justice, intricately linked to his account of moral development, is at once simplistic and mysterious, combining familiar conventionalistelements with perplexing, complicated elements of his rich moral psychology. These dimensions of his theory make interpreting it no easy task, although many have tried. Emerging from these many different attempts is a picture of Hume as defending an account of justice according to which justice consists of expedient rules designed to advance one’s self-interest. The mistake of this view, I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  47.  13
    Ecological Naturalism: Epistemic Responsibility and the Politics of Knowledge.Lorraine Code - 2005 - Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):87-101.
    The thesis of this paper is, first, that ecological thinking—which takes its point of departure from specifically located, multifaceted analyses of knowledge production and circulation in diverse demographic and geographic locations—can generate more responsible knowings than the reductivism of the positivist post-Enlightenment legacy allows; and second, that ecological thinking can spark a revolution comparable to Kant’s Copernican revolution, which recentered western thought by moving “man” to the center of the philosophical-conceptual universe. Kantian philosophy was parochial in the conception of “man” (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  25
    Statements of Fact: Whose? Where? When?Lorraine Code - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 26 (Supplement):175-208.
    The phrase “statements of fact” has a clear, unequivocal ring. It speaks of a stable place untouchable by contests in epistemology and in more secular places, around questions of constructivism, subjectivism, and the politics of knowledge. It offers fixity, a locus of constancy in a shifting landscape where traditional certainties have ceased to hold, maintains a vantage point outside the fray, where knowledge-seekers can continue to believe in some degree of “correspondence” between items of knowledge and events in the world. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49.  18
    The Knowing Subject.Lorraine B. Code - 1984 - Idealistic Studies 14 (2):109-126.
    In characterizing cognitive activity as a creative synthesis of the imagination, Kant places the epistemological subject at the center of the cognitive process. This is wholly revolutionary in the history of epistemology. Yet, for all its revolutionary character, the concept of the creative synthesis falls short of providing an adequate context for an explication of the ways in which individual human knowers, as organic creatures, create the products we call knowledge. Jean Piaget’s genetic epistemology, on the other hand, with its (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  5
    Dewey, Foucault and the value of horror: transformative learning through reading horror fiction.Ka Chung Lorraine Yeung - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 2 (54):75-93.
    This article advances an account of the nonhedonic values of horror fiction (including film). It is motivated by cases in which consuming horror fosters what theorists of education call "transformative learning" in adult students, which is a more shocking and disturbing experience than pleasurable. I first present two cases in which Polanski's Repulsion (1968) and Browning's Freaks (1932) disrupted and modified two students' experience of madness and abnormality respectively. Then I draw on Dewey's "aesthetic experience", Foucault's "experience book" and O'Leary's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000