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  1. Paul Bach-Y.-Rita, Mitchell Tyler & Kurt Kaczamarek (2003). Seeing with the Brain. International Journal Of Human-Computer Interaction 15 (2):285-295.
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  2. Talis Bachmann (1998). Fast Dynamics of Visibility of Brief Visual Images: The Perceptual-Retouch Viewpoint. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press.
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  3. Talis Bachmann (1997). Visibility of Brief Images: The Dual-Process Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (4):491-518.
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  4. Werner Backhaus (ed.) (2001). Neuronal Coding of Perceptual Systems. World Scientific.
  5. Dana Ballard (2002). Our Perception of the World has to Be an Illusion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):54-71.
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  6. N. Baxt (1982). On the Time Necessary for a Visual Impression to Come Into Consciousness. Psychological Research 44:1-12.
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  7. J. Beeckmans (2004). Chromatically Rich Phenomenal Percepts. Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):27-44.
    Visual percepts frequently appear chromatically rich, yet their paucity in reportable information has led to widely accepted minimalist models of vision. The discrepancy may be resolved by positing that the richness of natural scenes is reflected in phenomenal consciousness but not in detail in the phenomenal judgments upon which reports about qualia are based. Conceptual awareness (including phenomenal judgments) arises from neural mechanisms that categorize objects, and also from mechanisms that conceptually characterize textural properties of pre-categorically segmented regions in the (...)
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  8. Artem V. Belopolsky, The Role of Awareness in the Error-Processing of Involuntary Eye Movements.
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  9. Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong (2006). Strength of Early Visual Adaptation Depends on Visual Awareness. Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.
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  10. Ned Block (2011). Perceptual Consciousness Overflows Cognitive Access. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):567-575.
    One of the most important issues concerning the foundations ofconscious perception centerson thequestion of whether perceptual consciousness is rich or sparse. The overflow argument uses a form of ‘iconic memory’ toarguethatperceptual consciousnessisricher (i.e.,has a higher capacity) than cognitive access: when observing a complex scene we are conscious of more than we can report or think about. Recently, the overflow argumenthas been challenged both empirically and conceptually. This paper reviews the controversy, arguing that proponents of sparse perception are committed to the (...)
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  11. Bruno G. Breitmeyer & Haluk Ögmen (2006). Visual Masking: Time Slices Through Conscious and Unconscious Vision (2nd Ed.). Oxford University Press.
    This new edition uses the technique of visual masking to explore temporal aspects of conscious and unconscious processes down to a resolution in the...
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  12. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical and (...)
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  13. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  14. Robert Briscoe (2008). Another Look at the Two Visual Systems Hypothesis: The Argument From Illusion Studies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (8):35-62.
    The purpose of this paper is to defend what I call the action-oriented coding theory (ACT) of spatially contentful visual experience. Integral to ACT is the view that conscious visual experience and visually guided action make use of a common subject-relative or 'egocentric' frame of reference. Proponents of the influential two visual systems hypothesis (TVSH), however, have maintained on empirical grounds that this view is false (Milner & Goodale, 1995/2006; Clark, 1999; 2001; Campbell, 2002; Jacob & Jeannerod, 2003; Goodale & (...)
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  15. John R. Christie & John Barresi (2002). Consciousness and Information Processing: A Reply to Durgin. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):372-374.
    Durgin's (2002) commentary on our article provides us with an opportunity to look more closely at the relationship between information processing and consciousness. In our article we contrasted the information processing approach to interpreting our data, with our own 'scientific' approach to consciousness. However, we should point out that, on our view, information processing as a methodology is not by itself in conflict with the scientific study of consciousness - indeed, we have adopted this very methodology in our experiments, which (...)
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  16. Austen Clark (2001). Some Logical Features of Feature Integration. In Werner Backhaus (ed.), Neuronal Coding of Perceptual Systems. World Scientific. 3-20.
    One of the biggest challenges in understanding perception is to understand how the nervous system manages to integrate the multiple codes it uses to represent features in multiple sensory modalities. From different cortical areas, which might separately register the sight of something red and the touch of something smooth, one effortlessly generates the perception of one thing that is both red and smooth. This process has been variously called "feature integration", "binding", or "synthesis". Citing some current models and some historical (...)
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  17. A. I. Cogan (1995). Vision Comes to Mind. Perception 24:811-26.
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  18. Todd R. Davies, Donald D. Hoffman & Agustin M. G. Rodriguez (2002). Visual Worlds: Construction or Reconstruction? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):72-87.
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  19. Daniel C. Dennett (1992). Filling in Versus Finding Out: A Ubiquitous Confusion in Cognitive Science. In H. Pick, P. Van den Broek & D. Knill (eds.), [Book Chapter]. American Psychological Association.
    One of the things you learn if you read books and articles in (or about) cognitive science is that the brain does a lot of "filling in"--not filling in, but "filling in"--in scare quotes. My claim today will be that this way of talking is not a safe bit of shorthand, or an innocent bit of temporizing, but a source of deep confusion and error. The phenomena described in terms of "filling in" are real, surprising, and theoretically important, but it (...)
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  20. V. di Lollo, James T. Enns & R. Rensink (2000). Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes. Journal Of Experimental Psychology-General 129 (4):481-507.
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  21. Frank H. Durgin (2002). An Ostrich on a Rock: Commentary on Christie and Barresi (2002). Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):366-371.
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  22. Frank H. Durgin (2002). The Tinkerbell Effect: Motion, Perception and Illusion. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):88-101.
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  23. Frank H. Durgin (1995). On the Filling in of the Visual Blind Spot: Some Rules of Thumb. Perception 24:827-40.
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  24. David M. Eagleman & Terrence J. Sejnowski (2000). Motion Integration and Postdiction in Visual Awareness. Science 287 (5460):2036-2038.
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  25. Susanne Ferber & Stephen M. Emrich (2007). Maintaining the Ties That Bind: The Role of an Intermediate Visual Memory Store in the Persistence of Awareness. Cognitive Neuropsychology 24 (2):187-210.
  26. Gregory Francis & Frouke Hermens (2002). Comment on Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes (di Lollo, Enns & Rensink, 2000). Journal of Experimental Psychology 131 (4):590-593.
  27. Gary Hatfield (2012). Phenomenal and Cognitive Factors in Spatial Perception. In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oup Oxford. 35.
  28. C. Hofstoetter, Christof Koch & D. C. Kiper (2004). Motion-Induced Blindness Does Not Affect the Formation of Negative Afterimages. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):691-708.
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  29. Janet H. Hsiao & Sze Man Lam (2013). The Modulation of Visual and Task Characteristics of a Writing System on Hemispheric Lateralization in Visual Word Recognition—A Computational Exploration. Cognitive Science 37 (5):861-890.
    Through computational modeling, here we examine whether visual and task characteristics of writing systems alone can account for lateralization differences in visual word recognition between different languages without assuming influence from left hemisphere (LH) lateralized language processes. We apply a hemispheric processing model of face recognition to visual word recognition; the model implements a theory of hemispheric asymmetry in perception that posits low spatial frequency biases in the right hemisphere and high spatial frequency (HSF) biases in the LH. We show (...)
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  30. Liqiang Huang, Anne Treisman & Harold Pashler (2007). Characterizing the Limits of Human Visual Awareness. Science 317 (5839):823-825.
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  31. D. E. Irwin (1991). Information Integration Across Saccadic Eye Movements. Cognitive Psychology 23:420-56.
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  32. J. Lachter, Frank H. Durgin & T. Washington (2000). Disappearing Percepts: Evidence for Retention Failure in Metacontrast Masking. Visual Cognition 7:269-279.
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  33. David A. Leopold (2003). Visual Perception: Shaping What We See. Current Biology 13 (1).
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  34. David A. Leopold, Melanie Wilke, Alexander Maier & Nikos K. Logothetis (2002). Stable Perception of Visually Ambiguous Patterns. Nature Neuroscience 5 (6):605-609.
    Correspondence should be addressed to David A. Leopold david.leopold@tuebingen.mpg.deDuring the viewing of certain patterns, widely known as ambiguous or puzzle figures, perception lapses into a sequence of spontaneous alternations, switching every few seconds between two or more visual interpretations of the stimulus. Although their nature and origin remain topics of debate, these stochastic switches are generally thought to be the automatic and inevitable consequence of viewing a pattern without a unique solution. We report here that in humans such perceptual alternations (...)
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  35. Daniel Levitin (ed.) (2002). Foundations of Cognitive Psychology: Core Readings. MIT Press.
    An anthology of core readings on cognitive psychology.
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  36. Fiona Macpherson (2013). The Philosophy and Psychology of Hallucination: An Introduction. In Fiona Macpherson Dimitris Platchias (ed.), Hallucination: Philosophy and Psychology. MIT Press.
    An overview of the philosophy and psychology of hallucination and its relevance to the philosophy of perception.
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  37. Michael Madary (2012). How Would the World Look If It Looked as If It Were Encoded as an Intertwined Set of Probability Density Distributions? Frontiers in Psychology 3:419.
    Commentary on Andy Clark's "Whatever next? Predictive brains, situated agents, and the future of cognitive science" Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2013).
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  38. Thomas Metzinger (2000). Neural Correlates of Consciousness: Empirical and Conceptual Questions. MIT Press.
  39. A. D. Milner (2008). Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing in the Human Brain. In Lawrence Weiskrantz & Martin Davies (eds.), Frontiers of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
  40. Stephen R. Mitroff, Brian J. Scholl & Karen Wynn (2005). The Relationship Between Object Files and Conscious Perception. Cognition 96 (1):67-92.
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  41. Thomas Natsoulas (1994). An Introduction to Reflective Seeing. Journal of Mind and Behavior 15 (3):351-74.
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  42. Thomas Natsoulas (1993). An Introduction to Reflective Seeing. Journal of Mind and Behavior 14 (3):235-56.
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  43. R. Nijhawan & B. Khurana (2000). Conscious Registration of Continuous and Discrete Visual Events. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.
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  44. Kevin J. O'Regan (1992). Solving the "Real" Mysteries of Visual Perception: The World as an Outside Memory. Canadian Journal of Psychology 46:461-88.
  45. Haluk Ögmen & Bruno G. Breitmeyer (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. MIT Press.
  46. Scott D. Palmer (2002). Visual Awareness. In Daniel Levitin (ed.), Foundations of Cognitive Psychology: Core Readings. MIT Press.
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  47. Scott D. Palmer (1999). Vision Science: Photons to Phenomenology. MIT Press.
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  48. Luiz Pessoa, Evan Thompson & Alva Noë (1998). Finding Out About Filling-In: A Guide to Perceptual Completion for Visual Science and the Philosophy of Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (21):723–802.
    In visual science the term filling-inis used in different ways, which often leads to confusion. This target article presents a taxonomy of perceptual completion phenomena to organize and clarify theoretical and empirical discussion. Examples of boundary completion (illusory contours) and featural completion (color, brightness, motion, texture, and depth) are examined, and single-cell studies relevant to filling-in are reviewed and assessed. Filling-in issues must be understood in relation to theoretical issues about neuralignoring an absencejumping to a conclusionanalytic isomorphismCartesian materialism, a particular (...)
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  49. I. B. Phillips (forthcoming). Perception and Iconic Memory. Mind & Language.
    Philosophers have lately seized upon Sperling’s partial report technique and subsequent work on iconic memory in support of controversial claims about perceptual experience, in particular that phenomenology overflows cognitive access. Drawing on mounting evidence concerning postdictive perception, I offer an interpretation of Sperling’s data in terms of cue-sensitive experience which fails to support any such claims. Arguments for overflow based on change-detection paradigms (e.g., Landman et al., 2003; Sligte et al., 2008) cannot be blocked in this way. However, such paradigms (...)
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  50. W. A. Phillips (1974). On the Distinction Between Sensory Storage and Visual Short-Term Memory. Perception and Psychophysics 16:283-90.
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