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  1. R. L. Abrams & Anthony G. Greenwald (2000). Parts Outweigh the Whole (Word) in Unconscious Analysis of Meaning. Psychological Science 11 (2):118-124.
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  2. Michael Vannoy Adams (2010). The Mythological Unconscious. Spring Publications.
    Preface to the second edition -- Preface to the first edition -- Psycho-mythology : meschugge? -- Dreams and fantasies : manifestations 0f the mythological unconscious -- African-American dreaming and the "lion in the path" : racism and the cultural unconscious -- "Hapless" the Centaur : an archetypal image, amplification, and active imagination -- Pegasus and visionary experience : from the white winged horse to the "flying red horse" -- The bull, the labyrinth, and the Minotaur : from archaeology to "archetypology" (...)
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  3. E. Airapetyantz & K. Bykov (1945). Physiological Experiments and the Psychology of the Subconscious (Translation). Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 5 (June):577-593.
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  4. D. A. Allport (1979). Conscious and Unconscious Cognition: A Computational Metaphor for the Mechanism of Attention and Integration. In L. Nilsson (ed.), Perspectives on Memory Research. 61--89.
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  5. Luis M. Augusto (2014). Unconscious Representations 2: Towards an Integrated Cognitive Architecture. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 24 (1):19-43.
    The representational nature of human cognition and thought in general has been a source of controversies. This is particularly so in the context of studies of unconscious cognition, in which representations tend to be ontologically and structurally segregated with regard to their conscious status. However, it appears evolutionarily and developmentally unwarranted to posit such segregations, as,otherwise, artifact structures and ontologies must be concocted to explain them from the viewpoint of the human cognitive architecture. Here, from a by-and-large Classical cognitivist viewpoint, (...)
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  6. Luis M. Augusto (2013). Unconscious Representations 1: Belying the Traditional Model of Human Cognition. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 23 (4):1-19.
    The traditional model of human cognition (TMHC) postulates an ontological and/or structural gap between conscious and unconscious mental representations. By and large, it sees higher-level mental processes as commonly conceptual or symbolic in nature and therefore conscious, whereas unconscious, lower-level representations are conceived as non-conceptual or sub-symbolic. However, experimental evidence belies this model, suggesting that higher-level mental processes can be, and often are, carried out in a wholly unconscious way and/or without conceptual representations, and that these can be processed unconsciously. (...)
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  7. Luis M. Augusto (2010). Unconscious Knowledge: A Survey. Advances in Cognitive Psychology 6:116-141.
    The concept of unconscious knowledge is fundamental for an understanding of human thought processes and mentation in general; however, the psychological community at large is not familiar with it. This paper offers a survey of the main psychological research currently being carried out into cognitive processes, and examines pathways that can be integrated into a discipline of unconscious knowledge. It shows that the field has already a defined history and discusses some of the features that all kinds of unconscious knowledge (...)
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  8. F. Aveling (1922). Is the Conception of the Unconscious of Value in Psychology? Mind 31 (124):423-433.
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  9. Robert Balas, Aleksandra Gruszka, Błażej Szymura & Katarzyna Żyła (2007). Individual Differences in Unconscious Processing. Polish Psychological Bulletin 38 (1):32-39.
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  10. Mahzarin R. Banaji, Kristi M. Lemm & Siri J. Carpenter (2004). The Social Unconscious. In Marilynn B. Brewer & Miles Hewstone (eds.), Social Cognition. Perspectives on Social Psychology. Blackwell. 28-53.
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  11. Barry Beyerstein & Eric Eich (1993). Subliminal Self-Help Tapes: Promises, Promises. Rational Enquirer 6 (1).
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  12. Michael Billig (2001). Discursive Approaches to Studying Conscious and Unconscious Thoughts. In Deborah L. Tolman & Mary Brydon-Miller (eds.), From Subjects to Subjectivities: A Handbook of Interpretive and Participatory Methods. New York University Press. 290-303.
  13. Alexandre Billon (2011). Have We Vindicated the Motivational Unconscious Yet? A Conceptual Review. Frontiers in Psychoanalysis and Neuropsychoanalysis 2.
    Motivationally unconscious (M-unconscious) states are unconscious states that can directly motivate a subject’s behavior and whose unconscious character typically results from a form of repression. The basic argument for M-unconscious states claims that they provide the best explanation to some seemingly non rational behaviors, like akrasia, impulsivity or apparent self-deception. This basic argument has been challenged on theoretical, empirical and conceptual grounds. Drawing on recent works on apparent self-deception and on the ‘cognitive unconscious’ I assess those objections. I argue that (...)
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  14. Amanda Bischoff-Grethe, Shawnette M. Proper, Hui Mao, Karen A. Daniels & Gregory S. Berns (2000). Conscious and Unconscious Processing of Nonverbal Predictability in Wernicke's Area. Journal of Neuroscience 20 (5):1975-1981.
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  15. Robert F. Bornstein & T. S. Pittman (1992). Perception Without Awareness: Cognitive, Clinical, and Social Perspectives. Guilford.
  16. K. S. Bowers & D. Meichenbaum (eds.) (1982). The Unconscious Reconsidered. Wiley.
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  17. Marilynn B. Brewer & Miles Hewstone (eds.) (2004). Social Cognition. Perspectives on Social Psychology. Blackwell.
    Social Cognition is a collection of readings from the four-volume set of Blackwell Handbooks of Social Psychology that examine the mental representations that ...
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  18. A. Buchner (1997). Consciousness, Intention, and the Process Dissociation Procedure. Sprache and Kognition 16:176-182.
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  19. Jean-Pierre Changeux, Stanislas Dehaene, Lionel Naccache, Jérôme Sackura & Claire Sergenta (2006). Conscious, Preconscious, and Subliminal Processing: A Testable Taxonomy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (5):204-211.
    Amidst the many brain events evoked by a visual stimulus, which are specifically associated with conscious perception, and which merely reflect non-conscious processing? Several recent neuroimaging studies have contrasted conscious and non-conscious visual processing, but their results appear inconsistent. Some support a correlation of conscious perception with early occipital events, others with late parieto-frontal activity. Here we attempt to make sense of those dissenting results. On the basis of a minimal neuro-computational model, the global neuronal workspace hypothesis, we propose a (...)
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  20. Philip N. Chase & Anne C. Watson (2004). Unconscious Cognition and Behaviorism. Journal of Mind and Behavior 25 (2):145-159.
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  21. Axel Cleeremans (2006). Conscious and Unconscious Cognition: A Graded, Dynamic Perspective. International Journal of Psychology.
    Consider the following three situations: learning to perform a complex skill such as gymastics (a stunning demonstration of which participants to ICP 2004 experienced during the opening ceremony), learning a complex game such as the ancient Chinese game of Weichi (more widely known as Go), or learning natural language. What these situations have in common, beyond the sheer complexity of the required skills, is the fact that most of what we learn about each appears to proceed in a manner that (...)
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  22. Axel Cleeremans (2001). Conscious and Unconscious Processes in Cognition. International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences.
    Characterizing the relationships between conscious and unconscious processes is one of the most important and long-standing goals of cognitive psychology. Renewed interest in the nature of consciousness — long considered not to be scientifically explorable —, as well as the increasingly widespread availability of functional brain imaging techniques, now offer the possibility of detailed exploration of the neural, behavioral, and computational correlates of conscious and unconscious cognition. This entry reviews some of the relevant experimental work, highlights the methodological challenges involved (...)
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  23. Nelson Cowan & Michael A. Stadler (1996). Estimating Unconscious Processes: Implications of a General Class of Models. Journal of Experimental Psychology 125 (2):195-200.
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  24. Jan de Houwer (2006). Using the Implicit Association Test Does Not Rule Out an Impact of Conscious Propositional Knowledge on Evaluative Conditioning. Learning and Motivation 37 (2):176-187.
  25. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Habits, Nudges, and Consent. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (6):27 - 29.
    I distinguish between 'hard nudges' and 'soft nudges', arguing that it is possible to show that the latter can be compatible with informed consent - as Cohen has recently suggested; but that the real challenge is the compatibility of the former. Hard nudges are the more effective nudges because they work on less than conscious mechanisms such as those underlying our habits: whether those influences - which are often beyond the subject's awareness - can be reconciled with informed consent in (...)
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  26. Ap Dijksterhuis & Loran F. Nordgren (2006). A Theory of Unconscious Thought. Perspectives on Psychological Science 1 (2):95-109.
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  27. Ap Dijksterhuis & Zeger van Olden (2006). On the Benefits of Thinking Unconsciously: Unconscious Thought Can Increase Post-Choice Satisfaction. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 42 (5):627-631.
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  28. N. F. Dixon (1981). Preconscious Processing. Wiley.
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  29. Sean Draine, Anthony G. Greenwald & Mahzarin R. Banaji (1996). Modeling Unconscious Gender Bias in Fame Judgments. Consciousness And Cognition 5 (1-2):221-225.
  30. Matthew H. Erdelyi (1992). Psychodynamics and the Unconscious. American Psychologist 47:784-87.
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  31. Matthew H. Erdelyi (1974). A New Look at the New Look: Perceptual Defense and Vigilance. Psychological Review 81:1-25.
  32. A. Field (2000). I Like It, but I'm Not Sure Why: Can Evaluative Conditioning Occur Without Conscious Awareness? Consciousness and Cognition 9 (1):13-36.
    There is good evidence that, in general, autonomic conditioning in humans occurs only when subjects can verbalize the contingencies of conditioning. However, one form of conditioning, evaluative conditioning (EC), seems exceptional in that a growing body of evidence suggests that it can occur without conscious contingency awareness. As such, EC offers a unique insight into what role contingency awareness might play in associative learning. Despite this evidence, there are reasons to doubt that evaluative conditioning can occur without conscious awareness. This (...)
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  33. Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni & Giuseppe Galardi (2013). The Value of Spontaneous EEG Oscillations in Distinguishing Patients in Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States. In Eror Basar & et all (eds.), Application of Brain Oscillations in Neuropsychiatric Diseases. Supplements to Clinical Neurophysiology. Elsevier. 81-99.
    Objective: The value of spontaneous EEG oscillations in distinguishing patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states was studied. Methods: We quantified dynamic repertoire of EEG oscillations in resting condition with closed eyes in patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states (VS and MCS). The exact composition of EEG oscillations was assessed by the probability-classification analysis of short-term EEG spectral patterns. Results: The probability of delta, theta and slow-alpha oscillations occurrence was smaller for patients in MCS than for VS. Additionally, only (...)
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  34. T. Ford & Evan Thompson (2000). Preconscious and Postconscious Processes Underlying Construct Accessibility Effects: An Extended Search Model. Personality and Social Psychology Review 4:317-336.
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  35. Joseph P. Forgas, Kipling D. Williams & Simon M. Laham (eds.) (2004). Social Motivation: Conscious and Unconscious Processes. Cambridge University Press.
    Ground-breaking research by leading international researchers on the nature, functions and characteristics of social motivation.
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  36. Bertram Gawronski, Wilhelm Hofmann & Christopher J. Wilbur (2006). Are "Implicit" Attitudes Unconscious? Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):485-499.
  37. B. Gelder (2002). Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Process. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Anthony G. Greenwald (1992). New Look 3: Unconscious Cognition Reclaimed. American Psychologist 47:766-79.
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  39. Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.) (2005). The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past two decades, a new picture of the unconscious has emerged from a variety of disciplines that are broadly part of cognitive science. According to this picture, unconscious processes seem to be capable of doing many things that were thought to require intention, deliberation, and conscious awareness. Moreover, they accomplish these things without the conflict and drama of the psychoanalytic unconscious. These processes range from complex information processing, through goal pursuit and emotions, to cognitive control and self-regulation. This (...)
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  40. Harald Höffding & Mary E. Lowndes (2004). The Conscious and the Unconscious: From Outlines of Psychology (1881). American Imago. Special Issue 1750 (3):379-395.
  41. Robert R. Hoffman (1997). What Neural Network Studies Suggest Regarding the Boundary Between Conscious and Unconscious Mental Processes. In Dan J. Stein (ed.), Cognitive Science and the Unconscious. American Psychiatric Press.
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  42. Bernhard Hommel (2000). Intentional Control of Automatic Stimulus-Response Translation. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.
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  43. K. Imanaka & Brad Abernethy (2000). Distance-Location Interference in Movement Reproduction: An Interaction Between Conscious and Unconscious Processing? In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.
  44. Larry L. Jacoby, J. P. Toth, D. S. Lindsay & J. A. Debner (1992). Lectures for a Layperson: Methods for Revealing Unconscious Processes. In Robert F. Bornstein & B. Pittman (eds.), Perception Without Awareness: Cognitive, Clinical, and Social Perspectives. Guilford Press.
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  45. John F. Kihlstrom (1996). Unconscious Processes in Social Interaction. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press. 93--104.
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  46. John F. Kihlstrom (1995). The Rediscovery of the Unconscious Mind. In Harold J. Morowitz & Jerome L. Singer (eds.), The Mind, the Brain, and Complex Adaptive Systems. Addison-Wesley.
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  47. John F. Kihlstrom (1990). The Psychological Unconscious. In L. Pervin (ed.), Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research. Guilford Press.
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  48. John F. Kihlstrom (1987). The Cognitive Unconscious. Science 237:1445-1452.
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  49. John F. Kihlstrom (1984). Conscious, Subconscious, Unconscious: A Cognitive Perspective. In K. S. Bowers & D. Meichenbaum (eds.), The Unconscious Reconsidered. Wiley.
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  50. John F. Kihlstrom, T. M. Barnhardt & D. J. Tatryn (1992). The Psychological Unconscious: Found, Lost, and Regained. American Psychologist 47:788-91.
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