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  1. Biology as History: Papers From International Conferences Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale in Milan. Vol. 1: Systematic Biology as an Historical Science. Giovanni Pinna, Michael T. GhiselinBiology as History: Papers From International Conferences Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco and the Museo Civico di Storia Naturale in Milan. Vol. 2: New Perspectives on the History of Life: Essays on Systematic Biology as Historical Narrative. Michael T. Ghiselin, Giovanni Pinna. [REVIEW]Kraig Adler - 1998 - Isis 89 (3):584-585.
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  2. Essay on Classification.Louis Agassiz & Elizabeth Higgins Gladfelter - 2005 - Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):395-397.
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  3. Linguistic Evidence Supports Date for Homeric Epics.Eric Lewin Altschuler, Andreea S. Calude, Andrew Meade & Mark Pagel - 2013 - Bioessays 35 (5):417-420.
    The Homeric epics are among the greatest masterpieces of literature, but when they were produced is not known with certainty. Here we apply evolutionary-linguistic phylogenetic statistical methods to differences in Homeric, Modern Greek and ancient Hittite vocabulary items to estimate a date of approximately 710–760 BCE for these great works. Our analysis compared a common set of vocabulary items among the three pairs of languages, recording for each item whether the words in the two languages were cognate – derived from (...)
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  4. Typology Reconsidered: Two Doctrines on the History of Evolutionary Biology.Ron Amundson - 1998 - Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):153-177.
    Recent historiography of 19th century biology supports the revision of two traditional doctrines about the history of biology. First, the most important and widespread biological debate around the time of Darwin was not evolution versus creation, but biological functionalism versus structuralism. Second, the idealist and typological structuralist theories of the time were not particularly anti-evolutionary. Typological theories provided argumentation and evidence that was crucial to the refutation of Natural Theological creationism. The contrast between functionalist and structuralist approaches to biology continues (...)
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  5. Ontologies of Cellular Networks. Arp - 2008 - Science Signalling 1 (50):1-3.
    As part of a series of workshops on different aspects of biomedical ontology sponsored by the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO), a workshop titled "Ontologies of Cellular Networks" took place in Newark, New Jersey, on 27 to 28 March 2008. This workshop included more than 30 participants from various backgrounds in biomedicine and bioinformatics. The goal of the workshop was to provide an introduction to the basic tools and methods of ontology, as well as to enhance coordination between groups (...)
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  6. A Biologically Informed Hylomorphism.Christopher J. Austin - 2017 - In William M. R. Simpson, Robert C. Koons & Nicholas J. Teh (eds.), Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Contemporary Science. Routledge. pp. 185-210.
    Although contemporary metaphysics has recently undergone a neo-Aristotelian revival wherein dispositions, or capacities are now commonplace in empirically grounded ontologies, being routinely utilised in theories of causality and modality, a central Aristotelian concept has yet to be given serious attention – the doctrine of hylomorphism. The reason for this is clear: while the Aristotelian ontological distinction between actuality and potentiality has proven to be a fruitful conceptual framework with which to model the operation of the natural world, the distinction between (...)
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  7. The Ontology of Organisms: Mechanistic Modules or Patterned Processes?Christopher J. Austin - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (5):639-662.
    Though the realm of biology has long been under the philosophical rule of the mechanistic magisterium, recent years have seen a surprisingly steady rise in the usurping prowess of process ontology. According to its proponents, theoretical advances in the contemporary science of evo-devo have afforded that ontology a particularly powerful claim to the throne: in that increasingly empirically confirmed discipline, emergently autonomous, higher-order entities are the reigning explanantia. If we are to accept the election of evo-devo as our best conceptualisation (...)
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  8. Structural Powers and the Homeodynamic Unity of Organisms.Christopher J. Austin & Anna Marmodoro - 2017 - In William M. R. Simpson, Robert C. Koons & Nicholas J. Teh (eds.), Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Contemporary Science. Routledge. pp. 169-184.
    Although they are continually compositionally reconstituted and reconfigured, organisms nonetheless persist as ontologically unified beings over time – but in virtue of what? A common answer is: in virtue of their continued possession of the capacity for morphological invariance which persists through, and in spite of, their mereological alteration. While we acknowledge that organisms‟ capacity for the “stability of form” – homeostasis - is an important aspect of their diachronic unity, we argue that this capacity is derived from, and grounded (...)
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  9. The Organism in Interdisciplinary Context: Proceedings of the STOQ Research Group on Organisms Edited by Pietro Ramellini.Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (3):599-602.
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  10. Frédéric Bouchard and Philippe Huneman, Eds.: From Groups to Individuals. Evolution and Emerging Individuality.J. Ayala Francisco - 2014 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 36 (1):136-138.
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  11. Frédéric Bouchard and Philippe Huneman, Eds.: From Groups to Individuals. Evolution and Emerging Individuality.J. Ayala Francisco - 2014 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 36 (1):136-138.
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  12. Ins and Outs of Systems Biology Vis-À-Vis Molecular Biology: Continuation or Clear Cut?Philippe Backer, Danny Waele & Linda Speybroeck - 2010 - Acta Biotheoretica 58 (1):15-49.
  13. The Manipulability of What? The History of G-Protein Coupled Receptors.Ann-Sophie Barwich & Karim Bschir - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1317-1339.
    This paper tells the story of G-protein coupled receptors, one of the most important scientific objects in contemporary biochemistry and molecular biology. By looking at how cell membrane receptors turned from a speculative concept into a central element in modern biochemistry over the past 40 years, we revisit the role of manipulability as a criterion for entity realism in wet-lab research. The central argument is that manipulability as a condition for reality becomes meaningful only once scientists have decided how to (...)
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  14. Using the Hierarchy of Biological Ontologies to Identify Mechanisms in Flat Networks.William Bechtel - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (5):627-649.
    Systems biology has provided new resources for discovering and reasoning about mechanisms. In addition to generating databases of large bodies of data, systems biologists have introduced platforms such as Cytoscape to represent protein–protein interactions, gene interactions, and other data in networks. Networks are inherently flat structures. One can identify clusters of highly connected nodes, but network representations do not represent these clusters as at a higher level than their constituents. Mechanisms, however, are hierarchically organized: they can be decomposed into their (...)
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  15. SMT and TOFT: Why and How They Are Opposite and Incompatible Paradigms.Mariano Bizzarri & Alessandra Cucina - forthcoming - Acta Biotheoretica.
  16. Marc Ereshefsky, Ed., The Units of Evolution: Essays on the Nature of Species Reviewed By.Pierre Blackburn - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14 (2):92-94.
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  17. Nudges and Cultural Variance: A Note on Selinger and Whyte.Luc Bovens - 2010 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (3-4):483-486.
    Selinger and Whyte argue that Thaler and Sunstein are insufficiently sensitive to cultural variance in Nudge. I construct a taxonomy of the various roles that cultural variance may play in nudges. First, biases that are exploited in nudging may interact with features that are culturally specific. Second, cultures may be more or less susceptible to certain biases. Third, cultures may resolve conflicting biases in different ways. And finally, nudge may be enlisted for different aims in different cultures.
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  18. The Systematics of Non-System.Joan Brandt - 1987 - American Journal of Semiotics 5 (1):133-150.
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  19. Biotypology IV. Morphological Typology of the Individual and of Groups.Walter Brandt - 1949 - Acta Biotheoretica 9 (1-2):41-56.
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  20. Biotypology.Walter Brandt - 1947 - Acta Biotheoretica 8 (3):77-86.
    L'auteur décrit dans cette troisième communication le développement de la constitution humaine basant sur une différente célérité de la différentiation des parties élémentaires du corps. L'isodromie des parties homologiques de deux individus est représentée par la même célérité de leurs phases de la différentiation, l'anisodromie par une célérité différente. Chapitre B: Le phénomène de la retardation ou de l'accélération de la differentiation est appliqué à une classification typologique de l'homme. Chapitre C: La normalité biologique est le degré moyen de la (...)
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  21. Biotypology II. Growth as Factor of Development of the Individual Types and of the Ecological Types of Man.Walter Brandt - 1938 - Acta Biotheoretica 4 (2):119-132.
  22. Biotypologie.Walter Brandt - 1936 - Acta Biotheoretica 2 (2):125-140.
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  23. Fifty Shades of Cladism.Andrew V. Z. Brower - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (1-2):8.
    Quinn offered seven definitions of “cladist” and discussed the context in which they are used in relation to historical and current debates in systematics. As a member of her study taxon, I offer some contextual color commentary, clarifications on the views of “pattern cladists” regarding monophyly, ancestors, synapomorphy and other concepts, a definition of “syncretist”, and some thoughts on cladistics and philosophy in the twenty first century.
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  24. Phylogeny of Γ‐Proteobacteria: Resolution of One Branch of the Universal Tree?James R. Brown & Craig Volker - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (5):463-468.
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  25. Systems Biology: At Last an Integrative Wet and Dry Biology.Frank J. Bruggeman - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):183-188.
    The progress of the molecular biosciences has been so enormous that a discipline studying how cellular functioning emerges out of the behaviors of their molecular constituents has become reality. Systems biology studies cells as spatiotemporal networks of interacting molecules using an integrative approach of theory , experimental biology , and quantitative network-wide analytical measurement . Its aim is to understand how molecules jointly bring about life. Systems biology is rapidly discovering principles governing the functioning of molecular networks and methods to (...)
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  26. The Threefold Parallelism of Agassiz and Haeckel, and Polarity Determination in Phylogenetic Systematics.Harold N. Bryant - 1995 - Biology and Philosophy 10 (2):197-217.
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  27. Reply to Gregg.Roger C. Buck & David L. Hull - 1969 - Systematic Zoology 18 (3):354-357.
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  28. Toward an Organismal, Integrative, and Iterative Phylogeography.David Buckley - 2009 - Bioessays 31 (7):784-793.
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  29. Building on Bedrock: William Steel Creighton and the Reformation of Ant Systematics, 1925-1970. [REVIEW]Joshua Blu Buhs - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):27 - 70.
    Ideas about the natural world are intertwined with the personalities, practices, and the workplaces of scientists. The relationships between these categories are explored in the life of the taxonomist William Steel Creighton. Creighton studied taxonomy under William Morton Wheeler at Harvard University. He took the rules he learned from Wheeler out of the museum and into the field. In testing the rules against a new situation, Creighton found them wanting. He sought a new set of taxonomic principles, one he eventually (...)
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  30. From Cells to Systems: Conceptual Abstractions of Biological Building Blocks.Werner Callebaut & Manfred D. Laubichler - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):117-118.
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  31. Marc Ereshefsky, The Poverty of Linnaean Hierarchy. A Philosophical Study of Biological Taxonomy.M. Capocci - 2002 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (2):303-303.
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  32. Hybridization and the Typological Paradigm.Charles Carlson - unknown
    The presence of parasites in a population has an impact on mate choice and has substantial evolutionary significance. A relatively unexplored aspect of this dynamic is whether or not the presence of parasites increases the likelihood of hybridization events, which also have a significant role in ecological adaptation. One explanation of increased hybridization in some areas and not others is that stress from parasites results in selection for an increase of novel genotypes. Two swordtail species Xiphophorus birchmanni and Xiphophorus malinche (...)
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  33. Optimal Body Size and an Animal's Diet.Ted J. Case - 1979 - Acta Biotheoretica 28 (1):54-69.
    Within many animal taxa there is a trend for the species of larger body size to eat food of lower caloric value. For example, most large extant lizards are herbivorous. Reasonable arguments based on energetic considerations are often invoked to explain this trend, yet, while these factors set limits to feasible body size, they do not in themselves mathematically produce optimum body sizes. A simple optimization model is developed here which considers food search, capture, and eating rates and the metabolic (...)
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  34. Systematics of Humankind. Palma 2000: An International Working Group on Systematics in Human Paleontology.C. J. Cela-Conde, E. Aguirre, F. J. Ayala, P. V. Tobias, D. Turbon, L. C. Aiello, M. Collard, M. Goodman, C. P. Groves & F. Clark Howell - forthcoming - Ludus Vitalis.
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  35. Bipedal/Savanna/Cladogeny Model. Can It Still Be Held?Camilo J. Cela-Conde - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (2):213 - 224.
    With the discovery of Australopithecus, the concepts of bipedalism, the emergence of the open savannas, and the separation of pongids and hominids (bipedal-savanna-cladogeny; the BSC model) were integrated in an attempt to interpret the keys to the emergence of man. However, palæoclimatology, palaeoecology, and the morphology of A. ramidus and A. afarensis show that early hominids were better adapted to the tropical forest. Consequently, the BSC model is no longer valid, even though the relationship between open savannas and bipedalism can (...)
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  36. Systematics of Human Kind. Statement From Palma 2000: An International Working Group on Systematics in Human Paleontology.: An International Working Group on Systematics in Human Paleontology. [REVIEW]C. Cela-Donce - 2001 - Ludus Vitalis 9 (15):177202.
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  37. Concerning Individuality.Leon Chernyak & Alfred I. Tauber - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (4):489-499.
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  38. Methodological Problems of Systematization in Biological Taxonomy.F. Cizek & B. Krisa - 1987 - Filosoficky Casopis 35 (3):363-375.
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  39. The Multiple Realizability of Biological Individuals.Ellen Clarke - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy 110 (8):413-435.
    Biological theory demands a clear organism concept, but at present biologists cannot agree on one. They know that counting particular units, and not counting others, allows them to generate explanatory and predictive descriptions of evolutionary processes. Yet they lack a unified theory telling them which units to count. In this paper, I offer a novel account of biological individuality, which reconciles conflicting definitions of ‘organism’ by interpreting them as describing alternative realisers of a common functional role, and then defines individual (...)
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  40. Plant Individuality: A Solution to the Demographer's Dilemma.Ellen Clarke - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):321-361.
    The problem of plant individuality is something which has vexed botanists throughout the ages, with fashion swinging back and forth from treating plants as communities of individuals (Darwin 1800 ; Braun and Stone 1853 ; Münch 1938 ) to treating them as organisms in their own right, and although the latter view has dominated mainstream thought most recently (Harper 1977 ; Cook 1985 ; Ariew and Lewontin 2004 ), a lively debate conducted mostly in Scandinavian journals proves that the issues (...)
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  41. The Problem of Biological Individuality.Ellen Clarke - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):312-325.
    Darwin’s classic ‘Origin of Species’ (Darwin 1859) described forces of selection acting upon individuals, but there remains a great deal of controversy about what exactly the status and definition of a biological individual is. Recently some authors have argued that the individual is dispensable – that an inability to pin it down is not problematic because little rests on it anyway. The aim of this paper is to show that there is a real problem of biological individuality, and an urgent (...)
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  42. Hierarchy of Organization in Eukaryotic Chromosomes (a Review).Norman S. Cohn - 1971 - Acta Biotheoretica 20 (1-2):41-70.
    Several models of macromolecular arrangements in eukaryotic chromosomes have been proposed during the past fifteen years. Many of the models are consistent with physical and chemical data on the molecular components of chromosomes, and a few have the appearance of meeting the requirements for cytological organization in chromosomes. However, one of the most frustrating problems in developing a working model is to provide a scheme that fits genetic function while satisfying the structural parameters. This has not yet been achieved.Although emphasis (...)
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  43. Genetic Structure and Avian Systematics.Kendall W. Corbin - 1983 - In R. F. Johnston (ed.), Current Ornithology. Plenum Press. pp. 211--244.
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  44. Book Review: Molecular Evolution: A Phylogenetic Approach. [REVIEW]Bernie Crespi - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (4):405-405.
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  45. Marc Ereshefsky, Ed., The Units of Evolution. Essays on the Nature of Species Reviewed By.Suzanne Cunningham - 1993 - Philosophy in Review 13 (6):304-306.
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  46. Convergence, Contingency & Morphospace.Adrian Mitchell Currie - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):583-593.
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  47. The Diverse Interactors.Joachim L. Dagg - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):305-306.
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  48. Differentiation in Biology.J. Dankmeljer, J. Gloor & P. H. Laer - 1975 - Acta Biotheoretica 24 (1-2).
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  49. Toward a Philosophy of Systems Biology: Systems Biology: Philosophical Foundations, Fred C. Boogerd , Frank J. Bruggeman , Jan-Hendrik S. Hofmeyr , and Hans V. Westerhoff , Eds. Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007, (360 Pp; €99.95 Hbk; ISBN 978-0-444-52085-2). [REVIEW]Jonathan F. Davies & Maureen A. O'Malley - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (4):420-422.
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  50. Toward a Philosophy of Systems Biology.Jonathan F. Davies & Maureen A. O’Malley - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (4):420-422.
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