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  1. Circularidad y saber inmediato en el punto de partida de la "fenomenología del espíritu".José María Artola Barrenechea - 1970 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 5 (5):53-86.
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  2. Hegel’s Phenomenology: Facing the Preface.Howard Adelman - 1984 - Idealistic Studies 14 (2):159-170.
    Hegel, in the Preface to the Phenomenology, states that it seems not only superfluous but inappropriate and misleading to begin a work of philosophy by explaining the end the author had in mind, the circumstances which gave rise to the work, and the strategies the author has adopted, in contrast to those of his contemporaries and predecessors. If such a preface is appropriate, then it will be an unphilosophical preface to a philosophical work. If the preface attempts to be philosophical, (...)
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  3. Reducing Spirit to Substance: Dove on Hegel’s Method.Wendy Lynn Clark & J. M. Fritzman - 2002 - Idealistic Studies 32 (2):73-100.
    In “Hegel’s Phenomenological Method,” Kenley R. Dove maintains that the method of the Phenomenology of Spirit is not dialectical but instead wholly phenomenological. That is, Dove claims that Hegel’s method is purely descriptive. Dove’s interpretation has been highly influential and widely accepted. This article argues that, although there is a phenomenological aspect to Hegel’s method, that aspect itself presupposes a prior dialectical moment. Failure to account for that dialectical moment results in spirit being reduced to substance.
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  4. Conscience, Recognition, and the Irreducibility of Difference In Hegel’s Conception of Spirit.Nathan Andersen - 2005 - Idealistic Studies 35 (2/3):119-136.
    Hegel’s conception of Spirit does not subordinate difference to sameness, in a way that would make it unusable for a genuinely intersubjective idealism directed to a comprehensive account of the contemporary world. A close analysis of the logic of recognition and the dialectic of conscience in the Phenomenology of Spirit demonstrates that the unity of Spirit emerges in and through conflict, and is forged in the process whereby particular encounters between differently situated individuals reveal and establish the emerging character and (...)
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  5. Self-Awareness in Hegel’s Phenomenology of the Mind. [REVIEW]Johannes Balthasar - 1989 - Philosophy and History 22 (1):31-32.
  6. Hegel’s Confessions; or, Why We Need a Sequel to the Phenomenology of Spirit.Andrew Cutrofello - 1994 - The Owl of Minerva 26 (1):21-28.
    The act of confession plays a crucial and recurring role in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Alienation between individuals, Hegel suggests, can be overcome only through a mutual confessing and forgiving between two alienated consciousnesses. Thus the dramatic climax of the text occurs at the close of the “Spirit” section, with the breaking of the hard heart and the reciprocal acts of confession and forgiveness on the parts of the acting and judging consciousnesses. Leading up to this act of mutual confession (...)
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  7. Hegel’s Idea of a Phenomenology of Spirit. [REVIEW]John W. Burbidge - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):248-250.
  8. Coherent Theory of Truth and Its Forerunners.Rinat M. Nugayev - 2014 - In Vladimir G. Kuznetzov & Alexandre A. Pechenkin (eds.), Science,Philosophy and Humanities. Moscow State University. pp. 44-66.
    Arguments pro and contra convergent realism - underdetermination of theory by observational evidence and pessimistic meta-induction from past falsity- are considered. It is argued that, to meet the counter-arguments challenge, convergent realism should be considerably changed with a help of modification of the propositions from this meta-programme’s “hard core” and “protecting belt”. Maybe one of the ways out is to turn to the coherent theory of truth. Some of the works of Hegel (as interpreted by Merab Mamardashvili and Alexandre Kojev), (...)
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  9. HEGELIAN ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY: PHENOMENOLOGY, LOGIC AND HOLISM.Agemir Bavaresco - manuscript
    The classic analytic tradition associated the philosophy of George Berkeley with idealism. Yet in terms of the German Idealismus, Berkeley was no idealist. Rather, he described himself as an “immaterialist”. In the classic analytic tradition we find a misunderstanding of the German Idealismus. This paper will suggest, through reference to the work of Paul Redding, that Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit presents Idealismus as that which reconciles objectivity and subjectivity in the experience of consciousness. Hegel’s Phenomenology develops this idea in the (...)
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  10. Eine Lektüre von Hegels Phänomenologie des Geistes.Kurt Appel & Thomas Auinger (eds.) - 2009 - P. Lang.
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  11. The Certainty of Sense-Certainty.Nathan Andersen - 2010 - Idealistic Studies 40 (3):215-234.
    Commentators on the Phenomenology of Spirit have offered careful but conflicting accounts of Hegel’s chapter on sense-certainty, either defending his starting point and analysis or challenging it on its own terms for presupposing too much. Much of the disagreement regarding both the subject matter and success of Hegel’s chapter on sense-certainty can be traced to misunderstandings regarding the nature and role of certainty itself in the Phenomenology of Spirit. Specifically, such confusions can be traced to a failure to appreciate the (...)
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  12. The Berlin Phenomenology. By G. W. F. Hegel.James Collins - 1983 - Modern Schoolman 60 (3):208-209.
  13. The Problem of Immediate Knowledge in the Philosophy of Hegel.V. F. Asmus - 1963 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 1 (4):44-50.
    The problem of immediate intuitive knowledge occupied Hegel throughout his life. The problem of the relation of immediate to mediate knowledge, of intuition to proof, was one that Hegel solved for himself at the outset of his development as a philosopher. He remained true to this solution in all the years that followed.
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  14. The Self and Its Body in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit (Review).Robert Berman - 1998 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (4):636-637.
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  15. Hegel and the Overcoming of the Understanding.Michael Baur - 1991 - The Owl of Minerva 22 (2):141-158.
    The purpose of the present essay is to explicate the basic movement which the Understanding exercises upon itself at the end of the chapter on “Force and the Understanding” in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Unlike many other commentators on the Phenomenology, I hope to show how Hegel’s argumentation in this chapter applies not merely to the Newtonian paradigm (to which Hegel makes explicit reference), but to any paradigm which involves the objectivistic presuppositions of the Understanding.
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  16. Spinozist Pantheism and the Truth of "Sense Certainty": What the Eleusinian Mysteries Tell Us About Hegel's Phenomenology.Brady Bowman - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (1):85-110.
    The Opening Chapter of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, called "Sense Certainty," is brief: 283 lines or about seven and a half pages in the critical edition of Hegel's works . Just over half the text is devoted to a series of thought experiments1 that focus on "the Here" and "the Now" as the two basic forms of immediate sensuous particularity Hegel calls "the This." The chapter's main goal is to demonstrate that, in truth, the object of sense certainty is precisely (...)
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  17. Hegel's Grounding of Intersubjectivity in the Master-Slave Dialectic.S. Bird-Pollan - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (3):237-256.
    In this article I seek to explain Hegel’s significance to contemporary meta-ethics, in particular to Kantian constructivism. I argue that in the master–slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit , Hegel shows that self-consciousness and intersubjectivity arise at the same time. This point, I argue, shows that there is no problem with taking other people’s reasons to motivate us since reflection on our aims is necessarily also reflection on the needs of those around us. I further explore Hegel’s contribution to (...)
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  18. Time in Hegel’s Phenomenology.Alan B. Brinkley - 1960 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 9:3-15.
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  19. Hegel on Metaphilosophy and the “Philosophic Spectator”.Daniel Berthold-Bond - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (3):205-217.
    In this article I will discuss various aspects of Hegel’s radical critique of metaphilosophy. This critique announces a clear-cut departure from the widely held conviction in the philosophic tradition that in order to gain a firm foundation for science, a preliminary examination of the capacity and nature of knowledge is required. Hegel’s position is that such a propaedeutic is impossible. In the first part of this article, I will show how Hegel’s position can be illuminated in terms of his criticism (...)
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  20. Hegel’s Phenomenological Analysis and Freud’s Psychoanalysis.Darrel E. Christensen - 1968 - International Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):356-378.
  21. Untimely Review of Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.Robert Brandom - 2008 - Topoi 27 (1-2):161–4.
    The Anglophone philosophical world is currently riding a swelling wave of enthusiasm for a big, dense, blockbuster of a book by the previously unknown Jena philosopher, George Hegel. His Phenomenology of Spirit, originally in German, now available also in English, picks up and weaves together in a surprising and wholly original way a large number of today’s most fashionable ideas. Although he never comes right out and says so, I take it that the main topic the book addresses is the (...)
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  22. Review Essays: Recent Work on Hegel: The Rehabilitation of an Epistemologist?Review Author[S.]: Karl Ameriks - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (1):177-202.
  23. Hegel's Phenomenology.J. B. Baillie - 1932 - Mind 41 (163):407-408.
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  24. Georg Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.Robert Brandom - 2008 - Topoi 27 (1-2):161-164.
  25. The Structure of Desire and Recognition: Self-Consciousness and Self-Constitution.Robert B. Brandom - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (1):127-150.
    It is argued that at the center of Hegel’s phenomenology of consciousness is the notion that experience is shaped by identification and sacrifice. Experience is the process of self - constitution and self -transformation of a self -conscious being that risks its own being. The transition from desire to recognition is explicated as a transition from the tripartite structure of want and fulfillment of biological desire to a socially structured recognition that is achieved only in reciprocal recognition, or reflexive recognition. (...)
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  26. Hegel's Recollection. A Study of Images in the Phenomenology of Spirit.Daniel Breazeale - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (4):608-612.
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  27. Hegel and the Transformation of Philosophical Critique.William F. Bristow - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Hegel's objection -- Is Kant's idealism subjective? -- An ambiguity in 'subjectivism' -- The epistemological problem -- The transcendental deduction of the categories and subjectivism -- Are Kant's categories subjective? -- Hegel's suspicion : Kantian critique and subjectivism -- What is kantian philosophical criticism? -- Hegel's suspicion : initial formulation -- A shallow suspicion? -- Deepening the suspicion : criticism, autonomy, and subjectivism -- Directions of response -- Critique and suspicion : unmasking the critical philosophy -- Hegel's transformation of critique (...)
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  28. On the Importance of the Phenomenology's Preface.Thom Brooks - manuscript
    I want to raise the question of why we should give the Preface this special treatment. What do we hope to learn from such an extended examination of the Preface that will help further the study of Hegel's work beyond its present state? My comments will be limited to a few central issues, such as the relationship between the Phenomenology and the system, the Phenomenology as an introduction to the system, and the Phenomenology as a ladder, in order to best (...)
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  29. Review of Alfred Denker (Ed.), Michael Vater (Ed.), Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit: New Critical Essays[REVIEW]Thom Brooks - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (6).
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Hegel: Phenomenology and Systematic Philosophy
  1. Hegel's Laws: The Legitimacy of a Modern Legal Order.William E. Conklin - 2008 - Stanford: Stanford University Press.
    Hegel's Laws serves as an accessible introduction to Hegel's ideas on the nature of law. In this book, William Conklin examines whether state-centric domestic and international laws are binding upon autonomous individuals. The author also explores why Hegel assumes that this arrangement is more civilized than living in a stateless culture. The book takes the reader through different structures of legal consciousness, from the private law of property, contract, and crimes to intentionality, the family, the role of the state, and (...)
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  2. 'The Preface' Hegel's Legal Philosophy, and the Crises of His Time.William Conklin - 2017 - In Johnathan Lavery, William Sweet & Louis Groarke (eds.), Ideas Under Fire. New York: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 161-190.
    Hegel experienced several personal, political, and professional crises during his life. These crises impacted his dense theory about the importance of rational self-reflection in the organic character and evolution of law. The article argues that Hegel’s Preface to the Philosophy of Right manifests how one philosopher came to terms with the personal, social and political crises in which he found himself. In particular, the article outlines the central themes of the Preface and then explicates the important notion of Bildung in (...)
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  3. An den Grenzen von G. W. F. Hegels System.Michael Hackl - 2015 - Hegel-Jahrbuch 2015 (1).
  4. Hegel Und Die Grenzen Der Dialektik.Marie-Elise Zovko - 2001 - Hegel-Jahrbuch 3 (1):54-61.
  5. Cracking Open the Inverted World: Teleology Without End.Curtis Reed Naser - 1993 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook
    The "inverted world" and "dialectic of life" sections of G. W. F. Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit are analyzed in terms of Immanuel Kant's theory of teleological judgment as set forth in his Critique of Judgment. ;It is argued that the "inverted world" is an appropriation of Kant's speculations in the third Critique concerning the teleological unification of the laws of nature. The resultant concept of "infinity" is then analyzed as it develops in the "dialectic of life" as an appropriation of (...)
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  6. Notes on Hegel Interpretation of Plato's Parmenides in His Jena Essay on Skepticism.R. Trienes - 1990 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 97 (1):118-125.
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Hegel: Master-Slave Dialectic
  1. Intimacy and the Possibility for Self-Knowledge in Hegel's Dialectic of Recognition.Joseph Arel - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (3):133-152.
    The achievement of self-consciousness in Hegel’s Phenomenology hinges on establishing a relationship with another self-conscious being. How this is accomplished, and even that it is accomplished in Hegel’s text, are topics of dispute and misunderstanding in the literature. I show how Hegel argues for this intersubjective origin of self-consciousness, first, by comparing Hegel’s analysis of lord and bondsman to Sartre’s analysis of intimacy. Second, I focus on two in-terpretive challenges. First, I argue that the staking of life comes from an (...)
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  2. Response to Stephen Houlgate.John McDowell - 2009 - The Owl of Minerva 41 (1/2):27-38.
    I argue that Stephen Houlgate misstates an element in the Kantian background to my reading of “Lordship and Bondage” (§2). He misreads my remarks about the need to see Hegel’s moves there in the context of the progression towards absolute knowing (§3), and, partly consequently, he fails to engage with the motivation for my reading (§4). And he does not understand the way my reading exploits the concept of allegory (§5).
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Hegel: Phenomenological Observer
  1. Hegel's Confrontation with the Sciences in ‘Observing Reason’: Notes for a Discussion.Cinzia Ferrini - 2007 - Hegel Bulletin 28 (1-2):1-22.
    In an attempt to reconcile first-hand historical research on scientific material and philosophical concerns, this paper aims to show how Hegel took active part in the scientific debate of the time, by publicly siding with some strands of contemporaneous natural science against others, as well as how Hegel supports a considered scientific position, by providing it with philosophical justification and foundation, taking issue at the same time with formulations of British Empiricism and German Idealism.
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  2. Science, Consciousness and the “We” in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2000 - International Studies in Philosophy 32 (2):15-27.
Hegel: Phenomenology, Misc
  1. Kristeva’s Subject-in-Process: From Structure to Semiotic Criticism.William D. Melaney - 2009 - In Paul Forsell Eero Tarasti (ed.), Understanding/misunderstanding : Proceedings of the 9th Congress of the IASS/AIS, Helsinki-Imatra, 11-17 June, 2007. International Semiotics Institute. pp. 1074-81.
    As presented in the early work, 'Revolution in Poetic Language,' Julia Kristeva’s 'subject-in-process' can be interpreted as a semiotic alternative to older conceptions of the philosophical subject.This discussion of Kristeva’s early work will attempt to demonstrate that new interpretations of Fregean logic and Freudian psychoanalysis radically displace the traditional subject. This act of displacement allows Kristeva to employ Hegelian dialectics to introduce a “textual” conception of meaning of experience. As a consequence, the Kristevan semiotexte offers a basis for both understanding (...)
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  2. La description de la chose chez Hegel.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In M. Caron (ed.), Hegel. pp. 335-361.
    Que peut bien signifier la notion de description ? Désigne-t-on par là un simple acte psychique de l’esprit, une opération épistémique à part entière, ou encore un phénomène ancré dans la réalité même de la perception des choses ? Quel est « l’objet » de la description, et pourquoi se présente-t-il comme « chose » ? Et qui est le « sujet » de la description, qui décrit et selon quelles modalités ? La force des analyses hégéliennes tient précisément en (...)
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  3. Deleuze, Diversity, and Chance.Henry Somers-Hall - 2015 - Philosophy Today 59 (4):743-758.
    The aim of this paper is to respond to the discussions by John McCumber and Joshua Ramey of my monograph, Hegel, Deleuze, and the Critique of Representation. In the first part of this paper, I analyse McCumber’s claim that Deleuze’s concept of difference is already present within Hegel’s thought in the form of diversity. I make the claim that Deleuze formulates his concept of difference as the transcendental ground for Hegelian diversity, arguing that as such it differs in kind from (...)
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  4. Trascendentale.Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - In Luca Illetterati & Paolo Giuspoli (eds.), Filosofia classica tedesca: Le parole chiave. Carocci.
    This chapter explores Kant’s, Reinhold’s, Fichte’s, and Hegel’s stances toward transcendental philosophy and transcendental arguments. Having explained the new meaning that Kant assigned to the term ‘transcendental’, the chapter surveys his attempt to develop a transcendental philosophy by employing transcendental arguments. Since these arguments presuppose unproven matters of fact, authors who were deeply concerned by scepticism deemed them unsuitable for the task. The chapter explains how Reinhold and Fichte sought to establish solid foundations for transcendental philosophy without relying on transcendental (...)
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  5. La Negatività in Heidegger e Hegel.Francesca Brencio - 2010 - Aracne.
    Il pensiero contemporaneo ha subito la seduzione del negativo, sulla scia anche della riflessione hegeliana che, come riconosce Nietzsche, è stata la prima a portare la contraddizione nel cuore stesso della filosofia e della storia, facendone il nerbo logico e dialettico della realtà tutta. Hegel, infatti, ha portato la filosofia verso un confronto radicale e necessario con il negativo, senza prospettare alcuna possibilità di fuga davanti a esso. Il libro indaga il tema della negatività hegeliana nell’interpretazione fornita da Heidegger, partendo (...)
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  6. Kann man sagen, was man meint? Untersuchungen zu Hegels Sinnlicher Gewißheit.Dietmar H. Heidemann - 2002 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (1):46-63.
  7. Sense-Certainty and the 'This-Such'.Willem A. Devries - 2008 - In Dean Moyar & Michael Quante (eds.), Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.
    This article shows how Hegel's 'Sense-Certainty' chapter fills in a gap in Kant's and Sellars's critique of empiricism by supplying an argument that even indexical reference presupposes and is mediated by a larger conceptual framework.
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