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Summary The Modern Synthesis (of genetics and evolutionary theory) in the early 20th Century  did not assign development a significant role in explaining why certain phenotypes were expressed. Evolutionary Developmental Biology (evo-devo)  is broadly construed as the attempt to integrate developmental and evolutionary biology. Though discussions about Developmental Constraints, and morphogenetic fields (Process Structuralism) share the same goal of bringing developmental phenomena to bear on evolutionary arguments, papers included in the evo-devo sub-category will be those that argue for (or against) a contemporary re-synthesis in biology that would include developmental processes as evolvable traits. Such traits can be selected for, and in this way development is not merely a constraint on possible phenotypes but is itself, a trait that can evolve. This distinguishes the category of evo-devo from other models of the relationship between developmental phenomena and evolution.
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  1. Accounting For Vertebrate Limbs: From Owen's Homology To Novelty In Evo-Devo.Ron Amundson - unknown
    This article reviews the recent reissuing of Richard Owen’s On the Nature of Limbs and its three novel, introductory essays. These essays make Owen’s 1849 text very accessible by discussing the historical context of his work and explaining how Owen’s ideas relate to his larger intellectual framework. In addition to the ways in which the essays point to Owen’s relevance for contemporary biology, I discuss how Owen’s unity of type theory and his homology claims about fins and limbs compare with (...)
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  2. The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought: Roots of Evo-Devo.Ron Amundson - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book Ron Amundson examines two hundred years of scientific views on the evolution-development relationship from the perspective of evolutionary developmental biology. This perspective challenges several popular views about the history of evolutionary thought by claiming that many earlier authors had made history come out right for the Evolutionary Synthesis. The book starts with a revised history of nineteenth-century evolutionary thought. It then investigates how development became irrelevant with the Evolutionary Synthesis. It concludes with an examination of the contrasts (...)
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  3. The Changing Rule of the Embryo in Evolutionary Biology Structure and Synthesis.Ronald Amundson - 2005
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  4. EvoDevo as Cognitive Psychology.Ronald A. Amundson - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (1):10-11.
  5. Darwinian Dynamics Implies Developmental Ascendency.Ping Ao - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (1):113-115.
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  6. La Complejidad y la Forma.Armando Aranda-Anzaldo - 1997 - Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Económica.
    This book deals with embryology although it is not a book on embryology. It is in itself like a developing embryo and at a difference of textbooks it does not pretend to be an introduction to any particular scientific discipline. This work was born from a fascination about forms and it is the draft of a morphological process: the account of a form coming into being, the form of an as yet unnamed but emerging science. A new science of qualities (...)
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  7. Developmental Patterns and Processes in Islamicate Civilization and the Impact of Modernization.Said Arjomand - 2010 - In Hans Joas (ed.), The Benefit of Broad Horizons: Intellectual and Institutional Preconditions for a Global Social Science: Festschrift for Bjorn Wittrock on the Occasion of His 65th Birthday. Brill.
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  8. Darwin's Causal Pluralism.Stephen T. Asma - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (1):1-20.
    Historians of Biology have divided nineteenth century naturalists into two basic camps, Functionalists and Structuralists. This division is supposed to demarcate the alternative causal presuppositions working beneath research programs. If one is functionally oriented, then organic form will be contingent upon the causal powers of the environment. If structurally oriented, one argues for nonfunctional mechanisms (e.g., internal laws of growth) to account for organic form.Traditionally, Darwin has been grouped with the functionalists because natural selection (an adaptational mechanism) plays the prominent (...)
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  9. The Ontology of Organisms: Mechanistic Modules or Patterned Processes?Christopher J. Austin - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (5):639-662.
    Though the realm of biology has long been under the philosophical rule of the mechanistic magisterium, recent years have seen a surprisingly steady rise in the usurping prowess of process ontology. According to its proponents, theoretical advances in the contemporary science of evo-devo have afforded that ontology a particularly powerful claim to the throne: in that increasingly empirically confirmed discipline, emergently autonomous, higher-order entities are the reigning explanantia. If we are to accept the election of evo-devo as our best conceptualisation (...)
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  10. Making Sense of Life: Explaining Biological Development with Models, Metaphors, and Machines (Review).John C. Avise - 2004 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (1):145-148.
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  11. Development, Evolution, and the Concepts Between the Two.Jan Baedke - 2016 - Acta Biotheoretica 64 (1):99-103.
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  12. Development and Evolution.James Mark Baldwin - 1903 - Philosophical Review 12 (4):442-451.
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  13. Attracting Future Developmental Biologists Developmental Biology (3rd Edn, 1991). By S. F. Gilbert. Sinauer Associates, Massachusetts (UK. W. H. Freeman & Co., Ltd, Oxford). 891pp. £29.95, $48.95. Developmental Biology (1991). By L. W. Browder, C. A. Erickson and W. R. Jefferey. Saunders College Publishing, Florida. 811pp. £32 H/B, £15.50 P/B. [REVIEW]Jonathan Bard - 1992 - Bioessays 14 (4):293-294.
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  14. The Developmental Origins of Well-Being.David Jp Barker - 2005 - In Felicia A. Huppert, Nick Baylis & Barry Keverne (eds.), The Science of Well-Being. Oxford University Press.
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  15. Entangled Life: Organism and Environment in the Biological and Social Sciences.Gillian Barker, Eric Desjardins & Trevor Pearce (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
    Despite the burgeoning interest in new and more complex accounts of the organism-environment dyad by biologists and philosophers, little attention has been paid in the resulting discussions to the history of these ideas and to their deployment in disciplines outside biology—especially in the social sciences. Even in biology and philosophy, there is a lack of detailed conceptual models of the organism-environment relationship. This volume is designed to fill these lacunae by providing the first multidisciplinary discussion of the topic of organism-environment (...)
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  16. Universal Grammar and Biological Variation: An EvoDevo Agenda for Comparative Biolinguistics.Antonio Benítez-Burraco & Cedric Boeckx - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (2):122-134.
  17. Human Reproductive Cloning: Science, Jewish Law and Metaphysics.Barbara Pfeffer Billauer - forthcoming - ssrn.com.
    Abstract: Under traditional Jewish Law (halacha), assessment of human reproductive cloning (HRC) has been formulated along four lines of inquiry, which I discussed in Part I of this paper. Therein I also analyze five relevant doctrines of Talmudic Law, concluding that under with a risk-benefit analysis HRC fails to fulfill the obligation ‘to be fruitful and multiply’ and should be strictly prohibited. Here, I review of the topic from an exigetical Biblical and Kabbalistic perspective, beginning with exploring comments of the (...)
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  18. Is It Time for an Updated 'Eco-Evo-Devo'definition of Evolution by Natural Selection?Marion Blute - 2008 - Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):1.
    Abstract A lot of science has passed under the bridge since the classic definition of evolution as a change in gene frequencies in a population became common. Much knowledge has accumulated since then about evolution, heredity, ecology, development, phenotypic plasticity, niche construction and genetic drift. Building on Van Valen’s description of evolution as “the control of development by ecology,” it is suggested that the classic definition be replaced by a updated ‘eco‐evo-evo’ definition of evolution by natural selection which acknowledges this (...)
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  19. Origins and the EcoEvoDevo Problem.Marion Blute - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (2):116-118.
  20. The Use of Natural Kinds in Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Jessica Bolker - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (2):121-129.
    Evolutionary developmental biologists categorize many different kinds of things, from ontogenetic stages to modules of gene activity. The process of categorization—the establishment of “kinds”—is an implicit part of describing the natural world in consistent, useful ways, and has an essentially practical rather than philosophical basis. Kinds commonly serve one of three purposes: they may function (1) as practical tools for communication; (2) to support prediction and generalization; or (3) as a basis for theoretical discussions. Beyond the minimal requirement that classifications (...)
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  21. The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought: The Roots of Evo-Devo. [REVIEW]Peter Bowler - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Science 40 (3):460-462.
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  22. The Evolutionary Synthesis: Perspectives in the Unification of Biology. [REVIEW]Peter Bowler - 1983 - British Journal for the History of Science 16 (3):283-284.
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  23. Evolutionary Novelty and the Evo-Devo Synthesis: Field Notes.I. Brigandt & Alan C. Love - 2010 - Evolutionary Biology 37:93–99.
    Accounting for the evolutionary origins of morphological novelty is one of the core challenges of contemporary evolutionary biology. A successful explanatory framework requires the integration of different biological disciplines, but the relationships between developmental biology and standard evolutionary biology remain contested. There is also disagreement about how to define the concept of evolutionary novelty. These issues were the subjects of a workshop held in November 2009 at the University of Alberta. We report on the discussion and results of this workshop, (...)
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  24. Do We Need a ‘Theory’ of Development?Ingo Brigandt - 2016 - Biology and Philosophy 31 (4):603-617.
    Edited by Alessandro Minelli and Thomas Pradeu, Towards a Theory of Development gathers essays by biologists and philosophers, which display a diversity of theoretical perspectives. The discussions not only cover the state of art, but broaden our vision of what development includes and provide pointers for future research. Interestingly, all contributors agree that explanations should not just be gene-centered, and virtually none use design and other engineering metaphors to articulate principles of cellular and organismal organization. I comment in particular on (...)
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  25. Evolutionary Developmental Biology and the Limits of Philosophical Accounts of Mechanistic Explanation.Ingo Brigandt - 2015 - In P.-A. Braillard & C. Malaterre (eds.), Explanation in Biology: An Enquiry into the Diversity of Explanatory Patterns in the Life Sciences. Springer. pp. 135–173.
    Evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) is considered a ‘mechanistic science,’ in that it causally explains morphological evolution in terms of changes in developmental mechanisms. Evo-devo is also an interdisciplinary and integrative approach, as its explanations use contributions from many fields and pertain to different levels of organismal organization. Philosophical accounts of mechanistic explanation are currently highly prominent, and have been particularly able to capture the integrative nature of multifield and multilevel explanations. However, I argue that evo-devo demonstrates the need for a (...)
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  26. From Developmental Constraint to Evolvability: How Concepts Figure in Explanation and Disciplinary Identity.Ingo Brigandt - 2015 - In Alan C. Love (ed.), Conceptual Change in Biology: Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 305-325.
    The concept of developmental constraint was at the heart of developmental approaches to evolution of the 1980s. While this idea was widely used to criticize neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory, critique does not yield an alternative framework that offers evolutionary explanations. In current Evo-devo the concept of constraint is of minor importance, whereas notions as evolvability are at the center of attention. The latter clearly defines an explanatory agenda for evolutionary research, so that one could view the historical shift from ‘developmental constraint’ (...)
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  27. Essay: Homology.Ingo Brigandt - 2011 - The Embryo Project Encyclopedia.
    Homology is a central concept of comparative and evolutionary biology, referring to the presence of the same bodily parts (e.g., morphological structures) in different species. The existence of homologies is explained by common ancestry, and according to modern definitions of homology, two structures in different species are homologous if they are derived from the same structure in the common ancestor. Homology has traditionally been contrasted with analogy, the presence of similar traits in different species not necessarily due to common ancestry (...)
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  28. Beyond Reduction and Pluralism: Toward an Epistemology of Explanatory Integration in Biology.Ingo Brigandt - 2010 - Erkenntnis 73 (3):295-311.
    The paper works towards an account of explanatory integration in biology, using as a case study explanations of the evolutionary origin of novelties-a problem requiring the integration of several biological fields and approaches. In contrast to the idea that fields studying lower level phenomena are always more fundamental in explanations, I argue that the particular combination of disciplines and theoretical approaches needed to address a complex biological problem and which among them is explanatorily more fundamental varies with the problem pursued. (...)
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  29. Accounting for Vertebrate Limbs: From Owen's Homology to Novelty in Evo-Devo.Ingo Brigandt - 2009 - Philosophy & Theory in Biology 1 (20130604):e004.
    This article reviews the recent reissuing of Richard Owen’s On the Nature of Limbs and its three novel, introductory essays. These essays make Owen’s 1849 text very accessible by discussing the historical context of his work and explaining how Owen’s ideas relate to his larger intellectual framework. In addition to the ways in which the essays point to Owen’s relevance for contemporary biology, I discuss how Owen’s unity of type theory and his homology claims about fins and limbs compare with (...)
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  30. Typology Now: Homology and Developmental Constraints Explain Evolvability.Ingo Brigandt - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):709-725.
    By linking the concepts of homology and morphological organization to evolvability, this paper attempts to (1) bridge the gap between developmental and phylogenetic approaches to homology and to (2) show that developmental constraints and natural selection are compatible and in fact complementary. I conceive of a homologue as a unit of morphological evolvability, i.e., as a part of an organism that can exhibit heritable phenotypic variation independently of the organism’s other homologues. An account of homology therefore consists in explaining how (...)
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  31. A Theory of Conceptual Advance: Explaining Conceptual Change in Evolutionary, Molecular, and Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Ingo Brigandt - 2006 - Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    The theory of concepts advanced in the dissertation aims at accounting for a) how a concept makes successful practice possible, and b) how a scientific concept can be subject to rational change in the course of history. Traditional accounts in the philosophy of science have usually studied concepts in terms only of their reference; their concern is to establish a stability of reference in order to address the incommensurability problem. My discussion, in contrast, suggests that each scientific concept consists of (...)
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  32. Homology and Heterochrony: The Evolutionary Embryologist Gavin Rylands de Beer (1899-1972).Ingo Brigandt - 2006 - Journal of Experimental Zoology (Molecular and Developmental Evolution) 306:317–328.
    The evolutionary embryologist Gavin Rylands de Beer can be viewed as one of the forerunners of modern evolutionary developmental biology in that he posed crucial questions and proposed relevant answers about the causal relationship between ontogeny and phylogeny. In his developmental approach to the phylogenetic phenomenon of homology, he emphasized that homology of morphological structures is to be identified neither with the sameness of the underlying developmental processes nor with the homology of the genes that are in involved in the (...)
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  33. Homology in Comparative, Molecular, and Evolutionary Developmental Biology: The Radiation of a Concept.Ingo Brigandt - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Zoology (Molecular and Developmental Evolution) 299:9-17.
    The present paper analyzes the use and understanding of the homology concept across different biological disciplines. It is argued that in its history, the homology concept underwent a sort of adaptive radiation. Once it migrated from comparative anatomy into new biological fields, the homology concept changed in accordance with the theoretical aims and interests of these disciplines. The paper gives a case study of the theoretical role that homology plays in comparative and evolutionary biology, in molecular biology, and in evolutionary (...)
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  34. Conceptualizing Evolutionary Novelty: Moving Beyond Definitional Debates.Ingo Brigandt & Alan C. Love - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Zoology Part B: Molecular and Developmental Evolution 318:417-427.
    According to many biologists, explaining the evolution of morphological novelty and behavioral innovation are central endeavors in contemporary evolutionary biology. These endeavors are inherently multidisciplinary but also have involved a high degree of controversy. One key source of controversy is the definitional diversity associated with the concept of evolutionary novelty, which can lead to contradictory claims (a novel trait according to one definition is not a novel trait according to another). We argue that this diversity should be interpreted in light (...)
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  35. Nature-Nuture Reconceptualized in Developmental Perspective: A Bioecological Model.Urie Bronfenbrenner & Stephen J. Ceci - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (4):568-586.
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  36. How Embryologists Became Developmental Biologists and Other Matters.D. D. Brown - 1986 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 29 (3 Pt 2):S149.
  37. Identifying Behavioral Novelty.Rachael L. Brown - 2013 - Biological Theory (2):1-14.
    Although there is no in-principle impediment to an EvoDevo of behavior, such an endeavor is not as straightforward as one might think; many of the key terms and concepts used in EvoDevo are tailored to suit its traditional focus on morphology, and are consequently difficult to apply to behavior. In this light, the application of the EvoDevo conceptual toolkit to the behavioral domain requires the establishment of a set of tractable concepts that are readily applicable to behavioral characters. Here, I (...)
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  38. Learning, Evolvability and Exploratory Behaviour: Extending the Evolutionary Reach of Learning.Rachael L. Brown - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):933-955.
    Traditional accounts of the role of learning in evolution have concentrated upon its capacity as a source of fitness to individuals. In this paper I use a case study from invasive species biology—the role of conditioned taste aversion in mitigating the impact of cane toads on the native species of Northern Australia—to highlight a role for learning beyond this—as a source of evolvability to populations. This has two benefits. First, it highlights an otherwise under-appreciated role for learning in evolution that (...)
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  39. What Evolvability Really Is.Rachael L. Brown - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (3):axt014.
    In recent years, the concept of evolvability has been gaining in prominence both within evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) and the broader field of evolutionary biology. Despite this, there remains considerable disagreement about what evolvability is. This article offers a solution to this problem. I argue that, in focusing too closely on the role played by evolvability as an explanandum in evo-devo, existing philosophical attempts to clarify the evolvability concept have been overly narrow. Within evolutionary biology more broadly, evolvability offers a (...)
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  40. Local Developmental Agency From Without.Laszlo Bruszt & Balazs Vedres - forthcoming - Theory and Society.
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  41. Associating, Mobilizing, Politicizing: Local Developmental Agency From Without. [REVIEW]László Bruszt & Balázs Vedres - 2013 - Theory and Society 42 (1):1-23.
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  42. Quirks of Human Anatomy: An Evo‐Devo Look at the Human Body.Anne Buchanan - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (6):537-538.
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  43. Computational Ontogeny.William R. Buckley - 2008 - Biological Theory 3 (1):3-6.
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  44. Manfred D. Laubichler; Jane Maienschein .From Embryology to Evo‐Devo: A History of Developmental Evolution.Vii + 569 Pp., Figs., Tables, Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2007. $55. [REVIEW]Richard Burian - 2009 - Isis 100 (1):178-180.
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  45. On Integrating the Study of Evolution and of Development.Richard M. Burian - 1986 - In William Bechtel (ed.), Integrating Scientific Disciplines. pp. 209--228.
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  46. Introduction to the Special Issue 'From Embryology to Developmental Biology'.Richard M. Burian & Denis Thieffry - 2000 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 22 (3):313 - 323.
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  47. The Creation and Reuse of Information in Gene Regulatory Networks.Brett Calcott - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (5):879-890.
    Recent work on the evolution of signaling systems provides a novel way of thinking about genetic information, where information is passed between genes in a regulatory network. I use examples from evolutionary developmental biology to show how information can be created in these networks and how it can be reused to produce rapid phenotypic change.
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  48. Why How and Why Aren't Enough: More Problems with Mayr's Proximate-Ultimate Distinction.Brett Calcott - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):767-780.
    Like Laland et al., I think Mayr’s distinction is problematic, but I identify a further problem with it. I argue that Mayr’s distinction is a false dichotomy, and obscures an important question about evolutionary change. I show how this question, once revealed, sheds light on some debates in evo-devo that Laland et al.’s analysis cannot, and suggest that it provides a different view about how future integration between biological disciplines might proceed.
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  49. Contingency and Inherency in Evolutionary Developmental Biology.Werner Callebaut - 2010 - In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), Epsa Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer. pp. 1--7.
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  50. Desarrollo, causas remotas e historia natural.Gustavo Caponi - 2009 - Principia 13 (1):29-50.
    Having as starting point that a proximal cause is one which effects can be registered in the states of an individual organism, in this work I will argue that what defines an ultimate cause is the fact that its effects can be registered in the evolution of lineages, and not simply in population states. This, on the other hand, not only will allow us to clarify how the developmental constraints can be understood as causes of the evolutionary phenomena; but also (...)
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