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  1. Asylum, Credible Fear Tests, and Colonial Violence.Elena Ruíz & Ezgi Sertler - manuscript
    A credible fear test is an in-depth interview process given to undocumented people of any age arriving at a U.S. port of entry to determine qualification for asylum-seeking. Credible fear tests as a typical immigration procedure demonstrate not only what structural epistemic violence looks like but also how this violence lives in and through the design of asylum policy. Key terms of credible fear tests such as “significant possibility,” “evidence,” “consistency,” and “credibility” can never be neutral in the context of (...)
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  2. The Violence of Silencing.Barrett Emerick - forthcoming - In Jennifer Kling (ed.), Pacifism, Politics, and Feminism: Intersections and Innovations. Brill.
    I argue that silencing (the act of preventing someone from communicating, broadly construed) can be an act of both interpersonal and institutional violence. My argument has two main steps. First, I follow others in analyzing violence as violation of integrity and show that undermining someone’s capacities as a knower can be such a violation. Second, I argue that silencing someone can violate their epistemic capacities in that way. I conclude by exploring when silencing someone might be morally justifiable, even if (...)
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  3. Structural Trauma.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism 20 (2).
    This paper addresses the phenomenological experience of precarity and vulnerability in racialized gender-based violence from a structural perspective. Informed by Indigenous social theory and anti-colonial approaches to intergenerational trauma that link settler colonial violence to the modalities of stress-inducing social, institutional, and cultural violences in marginalized women’s lives, I argue that philosophical failures to understand trauma as a functional, organizational tool of settler colonial violence amplify the impact of traumatic experience on specific populations. It is trauma by design. I explore (...)
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  4. Women of Color Structural Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Shirley-Anne Tate (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Critical Race And Gender.
    One way to track the many critical impacts of women of color feminisms is through the powerful structural analyses of gendered and racialized oppression they offer. This article discusses diverse lineages of women of color feminisms in the global South that tackle systemic structures of power and domination from their situated perspectives. It offers an introduction to structuralist theories in the humanities and differentiates them from women of color feminist theorizing, which begins analyses of structures from embodied and phenomenological st¬¬andpoints--with (...)
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  5. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
  6. ‘Civility’ and the Civilizing Project.Nora Berenstain - 2020 - Philosophical Papers 49 (2):305-337.
    Calls for civility have been on the rise recently, as have presumptions that civility is both an academic virtue and a prerequisite for rational engagement and discussion among those who disagree. One imperative of epistemic decolonization is to unmask the ways that familiar conceptual resources are produced within and function to uphold a settler colonial epistemological framework. I argue that rhetorical deployments of ‘civility’ uphold settler colonialism by obscuring the systematic production of state violence against marginalized populations and Indigenous peoples, (...)
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  7. Cultural Gaslighting.Elena Ruíz - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (4):687-713.
    This essay frames systemic patterns of mental abuse against women of color and Indigenous women on Turtle Island (North America) in terms of larger design-of-distribution strategies in settler colonial societies, as these societies use various forms of social power to distribute, reproduce, and automate social inequalities (including public health precarities and mortality disadvantages) that skew socio-economic gain continuously toward white settler populations and their descendants. It departs from traditional studies in gender-based violence research that frame mental abuses such as gaslighting--commonly (...)
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  8. Η ατμοσφαιρικότητα της βίας υπό συνθήκες συνυφασμένων κρίσεων.Anna Carastathis - 2018 - Feministiqa 1 (1):6-15.
    [Abstract in English follows] -/- Το παρόν άρθρο πραγματεύεται την ατμοσφαιρική εννοιολόγηση της έμφυλης-φυλετικοποιημένης βίας, η οποία συνδέεται με τη μαύρη φεμινιστική σκέψη με την ύπαρξη και λειτουργία πολλαπλών, συνυφασμένων συστημάτων καταπίεσης. Παρουσιάζει μια διαθεματική προσέγγιση η οποία αποφεύγει την απομόνωση περιστατικών βίας από τις δομές, τους θεσμούς, τις υλικές, συναισθηματικές και αναπαραστατικές οικονομίες στο εσωτερικό των οποίων λαμβάνει χώρα η διαπροσωπική βία. Έπειτα, το άρθρο συνδέει την ατμοσφαιρικότητα της βίας με την ηγεμονία του φύλου, το οποίο υπό μια τρανσφεμινιστική (...)
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  9. Gender-Based Administrative Violence as Colonial Strategy.Elena Ruíz & Nora Berenstain - 2018 - Philosophical Topics 46 (2):209-227.
    There is a growing trend across North America of women being criminalized for their pregnancy outcomes. Rather than being a series of aberrations resulting from institutional failures, we argue that this trend is part of a colonial strategy of administrative violence aimed at women of color and Native women across Turtle Island. We consider a range of medical and legal practices constituting gender-based administrative violence, and we argue that they are the result of non-accidental and systematic production of population-level harms (...)
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  10. Making Peace Education Everyone’s Business.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2017 - In Ching-Ching Lin & Levina Sequeira (eds.), Inclusion, Diversity and Intercultural Dialogue in Young People's Philosophical Inquiry. Rotterdam: pp. 55-65.
    We argue for peace education as a process of improving the quality of everyday relationships. This is vital, as children bring their habits formed largely by social and political institutions such as the family, religion, law, cultural mores, to the classroom (Splitter, 1993; Furlong & Morrison, 2000) and vice versa. It is inevitable that the classroom habitat, as a microcosm of the community in which it is situated, will perpetuate the epistemic practices and injustices of that community, manifested in attitudes, (...)
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  11. Review of Bengal Partition Stories: An Unclosed Chapter. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2016 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (September):670-2.
    Bashabi Fraser is a poet in her own right. She is also a creative translator. This is a review of her edited volume on the Partition of Bengal. The review highlights our need to read the partition event as a warning for future and ongoing genocides. The review also shows the superiority of literature over history. And finally it has something to say about translation and separately, on P Lal. For instance, this reviewer in many other reviews too insists on (...)
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  12. Verletzende Worte: Die Grammatik Sprachlicher Missachtung.Hannes Kuch, Sybille Krämer & Steffen K. Herrmann (eds.) - 2015 - Transcript Verlag.
    TABLE OF CONTENTS -/- * Inhalt * Verletzende Worte. Eine Einleitung * Sprache als Gewalt oder: Warum verletzen Worte? * Bedingungen für den Erfolg von Degradierungszeremonien * Gesichtsbedrohende Akte * Die Dialektik von Herausforderung und Erwiderung der Herausforderung * Sprechakte und unsprechbare Akte * Diskriminierende Sprechakte. Ein funktionaler Ansatz * Symbolische Verletzbarkeit und sprachliche Gewalt * Über die Körperkraft von Sprache * Die geraubte Stimme * Nach dem angeblichen Ende der ›Sprachvergessenheit‹: Vorläufige Fragen zur Unvermeidlichkeit der * Verletzung Anderer in (...)
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  13. Rape as Spectator Sport and Creepshot Entertainment: Social Media and the Valorization of Lack of Consent.Kelly Oliver - 2015 - American Studies Journal (10):1-16.
    Lack of consent is valorized within popular culture to the point that sexual assault has become a spectator sport and creepshot entertainment on social media. Indeed, the valorization of nonconsensual sex has reached the extreme where sex with unconscious girls, especially accompanied by photographs as trophies, has become a goal of some boys and men.
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  14. Missing in Action: Violence, Power, and Discerning Agency.Alisa Bierria - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (1):129-145.
    How can black feminist and women of color feminist theoretical interventions help create frameworks for discerning agentic action in the context of power, oppression, and violence? In this paper, I explore the social dimension of agency and argue that intention is not just authored by the agent as a function of practical reasoning, but is also socially authored through others' discernment and translation of her action. Further, when facilitated by reasoning designed to reinforce and rationalize systems of domination, social authoring (...)
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  15. Challenges of Local and Global Misogyny.Claudia Card - 2014 - In Jon Mandle & David Reidy (eds.), A Companion to Rawls. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell. pp. 472-486.
    Rawls saw need for non-ideal theory also within society but never developed that project. In this chapter, Card suggests that the non-ideal part of Rawls’ Law of Peoples can be a resource for thinking about responding to evils when the subject is not state-centered. It is plausible that defense against great evils other than those of aggressive states should be governed by analogues of scruples that Rawlsian well-ordered societies observe in defending themselves against outlaw states. This essay explores those hypotheses (...)
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  16. Motivating Questions and Partial Answers: A Response to Prosecuting Domestic Violence by Michelle Madden Dempsey. [REVIEW]Sharon Cowan - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):543-555.
    Michelle Madden Dempsey’s compelling book sets out a normative feminist argument as to why and when prosecutors should continue to pursue prosecutions in domestic violence cases where the victim refuses to participate in or has withdrawn their support for the prosecution. This paper will explore two of the key aspects of her argument—the centrality and definition of the concept of patriarchy, and the definition of domestic violence—before concluding with some final thoughts as to the appropriate parameters of feminist prosecutorial decision-making. (...)
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  17. The Feminist Pacifism of William James and Mary Whiton Calkins.Mathew A. Foust - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):889-905.
    In this paper, I accompany William James and Mary Whiton Calkins in the steps each takes toward his or her respective proposal of a moral equivalent of war. I demonstrate the influence of James upon Calkins, suggesting that the two share overlapping formulations of the problem and offer closely related—but significantly different—solutions. I suggest that Calkins's pacifistic proposal is an extension of that of her teacher—a feminist interpretation of his psychological and moral thought as brought to bear on the problem (...)
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  18. Feminist Prosecutors and Patriarchal States.Kit Kinports - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):529-542.
    In Prosecuting Domestic Violence: A Philosophical Analysis, Michelle Madden Dempsey focuses on the dilemma prosecutors face when domestic violence victims are unwilling to cooperate in the criminal prosecution of their abusive partners. Starting from the premise that the ultimate goal should be putting an end to domestic violence, Dempsey urges prosecutors to act as feminists in deciding how to proceed in such cases. Doing so, Dempsey argues, will tend to make the character of the prosecutor’s community and state less patriarchal (...)
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  19. Part I: Introduction to the Philosophy of Hate Crime.David Brax & Christian Munthe - 2013 - In The Philosophy of Hate Crime Anthology. University of Gothenburg.
  20. The Philosophy of Hate Crime Anthology.David Brax & Christian Munthe - 2013 - University of Gothenburg.
    Introductory anthology to the philosophy of hate crime, written in the EU project "When Law and Hate Collide".
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  21. No Way Around Consent: A Reply to Rubenfeld on 'Rape-by-Deception'.Tom Dougherty - 2013 - Yale Jaw Journal Online 123:321-333.
  22. Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice.Deidre Nicole Green - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts traditional (...)
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  23. Heteronormativity and/as Violence: The “Sexing” of Gwen Araujo.Moya Lloyd - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):818-834.
    This paper will examine the violence of heteronormativity: the violence that constitutes and regulates bodies according to normative notions of sex, gender, and sexuality. This violence, I will argue, requires more than a focus on gendered or sexualized physical harms of the kinds normally examined when studying violence against sexual minorities or women. Rather, it necessitates focusing on the multiple modalities through which heteronormativity performs its violence on, through, and against bodies and persons, including through the production of certain bodies (...)
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  24. Towards a Relational Phenomenology of Violence.Michael Staudigl - 2013 - Human Studies 36 (1):43-66.
    This article elaborates a relational phenomenology of violence. Firstly, it explores the constitution of all sense in its intrinsic relation with our embodiment and intercorporality. Secondly, it shows how this relational conception of sense and constitution paves the path for an integrative understanding of the bodily and symbolic constituents of violence. Thirdly, the author addresses the overall consequences of these reflections, thereby identifying the main characteristics of a relational phenomenology of violence. In the final part, the paper provides an exemplification (...)
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  25. “Where Them Bloggers At?”: Reflections on Rihanna, Accountability, and Survivor Subjectivity.Alisa Bierria - 2012 - Social Justice 37 (4):101-124.
    Two weeks after reports came to light that singer Chris Brown had physically assaulted and abandoned his girlfriend, famous Barbadian pop star Rihanna, the celebrity blog TMZ released a close-up photo of Rihanna’s face taken by the Los Angeles Police Department the night she was beaten. The news and the photo sparked fierce online debates about domestic violence and culpability. The locus of accountability in many of these debates seemed to circle back to Rihanna, rather than land squarely on Chris (...)
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  26. Feminist Approaches to Religion and Torture.Christine E. Gudorf - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):613-621.
    Feminists look critically at any infliction of pain on others, usually requiring that it be consensual, and often both consensual and for the benefit of the person afflicted. Most torture of women is not recognized under official definitions of torture because it is not performed by or with the consent of (government) officials. Women are, however, also victims of torture under official definitions as military or civilian prisoners or as members of defeated populations in war, and are more often subjected (...)
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  27. Pharmacotherapy to Blunt Memories of Sexual Violence: What's a Feminist to Think?Elisa A. Hurley - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):527 - 552.
    it has recently been discovered that propranolol — a beta-blocker traditionally used to treat cardiac arrhythmias and hypertension — might disrupt the formation of the emotionally disturbing memories that typically occur in the wake of traumatic events and consequently prevent the onset of trauma-induced psychological injuries such as Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. One context in which the use of propranolol is generating interest in both the popufor and scientific press is sexual violence. Nevertheless, feminists have so far not weighed in on (...)
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  28. Discourses of Sexual Violence in a Global Framework.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):123.
    In this paper I make a preliminary analysis of Western (or global North) discourses on sexual violence, focusing on the important concepts of “consent” and “victim.” The concept of “consent” is widely used to determine whether sexual violence has occurred, and it is the focal point of debates over the legitimacy of statutory offenses and over the way we characterize sex work done under conditions involving economic desperation. The concept of “victim” is shunned by many feminists and nonfeminists alike for (...)
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  29. Follett's Pragmatist Ontology of Relations: Potentials for a Feminist Perspective on Violence.Amrita Banerjee - 2008 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (1):pp. 3-11.
  30. The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices.Debra B. Bergoffen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
    This essay argues that the ambiguities of the just war tradition, sifted through a feminist critique, provides the best framework currently available for translating the ethical entitlement to human dignity into concrete feminist political practices. It offers a gendered critique of war that pursues the just war distinction between legitimate and illegitimate targets of wartime violence and provides a gendered analysis of the peace which the just war tradition obliges us to preserve and pursue.
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  31. Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics.Samuel Allen Chambers - 2008 - Routledge.
  32. “The Stigma of Nation”: Feminist Just War, Privilege, and Responsibility.Marian Eide - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 48-60.
    If women are not yet accorded the full rights of citizenship internationally and especially in the military context, a feminist position on just war may have to be provisional. Drawing on Virginia Woolf's argument referenced in the title, Eide suggests in this essay that feminist theory develop its principles from women's exclusion from national privileges and argues that jus post bellum or justice after war be central to feminist theories of just war.
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  33. Gender Trouble at Abu Ghraib?Timothy Kaufman-Osborn - 2008 - In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge.
  34. Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
    This essay examines the stereotype that transgender people are “deceivers” and the stereotype's role in promoting and excusing transphobic violence. The stereotype derives from a contrast between gender presentation and sexed body. Because gender presentation represents genital status, Bettcher argues, people who “misalign” the two are viewed as deceivers. The author shows how this system of gender presentation as genital representation is part of larger sexist and racist systems of violence and oppression.
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  35. Normative Violence, Vulnerability, and Responsibility.Catherine Mills - 2007 - Differences 18 (2):133--156.
  36. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but it also (...)
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  37. Violence, Non-Violence: Sartre on Fanon.Judith Butler - 2006 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 27 (1):3-24.
    What is immediately strange about Sartre’s controversial preface to Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth is its mode of address. To whom is this preface written? Sartre imagines his reader as the colonizer or the French citizen who recoils from the thought of violent acts of resistance on the part of the colonized. Minimally, his imagined reader is one who believes that his own notions of humanism and universalism suffice as norms by which to assess the war for independence in (...)
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  38. The Manifolds of Violences.Karen Houle - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):184 - 195.
    : In this essay, Houle focuses in on the ways in which a Foucauldian-framed account of violence, such as the one Gail Mason offers in Spectacles of Violence, rattles liberal (theoretical and 'common-sensical') understandings of culpability and lawfulness. Mason's analysis dares to suggest that violence is constitutive, not simply destructive of selves, of lives. Asking after the ways in which that constitution is asymmetrical in events of violence, Houle reintroduce some cautions and concerns about drawing from a poststructuralist perspective. This, (...)
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  39. The Book at a Glance.Gail Mason - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):174-177.
    : Violence is a spectacle. Not because it is simply something that we observe but, more fundamentally, because it is a mechanism through which we observe and define other things. Violence has the capacity to shape the ways that we see, and thereby come to know, these things. In other words, violence is more than a practice that acts upon the bodies of individual subjects to inflict harm and injury. It is, metaphorically speaking, also a way of looking at these (...)
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  40. A Defense of Stiffer Penalties for Hate Crimes.Christopher Heath Wellman - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (2):62-80.
    : After defining a hate crime as an offense in which the criminal selects the victim at least in part because of an animus toward members of the group to which the victim belongs, this essay surveys the standard justifications for state punishment en route to defending the permissibility of imposing stiffer penalties for hate crimes. It also argues that many standard instances of rape and domestic battery are hate crimes and may be punished as such.
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  41. Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm.María Pía Lara - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):186-193.
    This paper deals with Claudia Card's important contributions to a theory of evil that steps out from traditional models of thinking about this problem (theodicies, metaphysical theories, etc.). Instead, our author seeks to explore important elements from other theorists (such as Kant and Nietzsche) in order to build up her ideas of what she calls the "atrocity paradigm." This critical essay focuses mainly in the spaces where Card's conclusions need to rethink the limits and constraints of her theory.
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  42. Claudia Card's Atrocity Paradigm.María Pía Lara - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):184-191.
    This paper deals with Claudia Card's important contributions to a theory of evil that steps out from traditional models of thinking about this problem . Instead, our author seeks to explore important elements from other theorists in order to build up her ideas of what she calls the "atrocity paradigm." This critical essay focuses mainly in the spaces where Card's conclusions need to rethink the limits and constraints of her theory.
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  43. Sexual Harassment.Claire P. Curtis - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (1):111-114.
  44. Obscene Undersides: Women and Evil Between the Taliban and the United States.Mary Anne Franks - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):135-156.
    : This paper proposes to supplement an American self-identity predicated on a model of absolute difference from the Taliban (good versus evil, etc.) by exploring affinities between their respective ideologies. The place of "woman," within and through the preponderance of sexual exploitation/violence common to both, is the starting point of this analysis. This article reads the two conflicting powers in a Lacanian/Zizekian dyad of the "Law" and its "obscene superego underside.".
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  45. Book Review: Bat-Ami Bar On. The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2002. [REVIEW]Margaret A. McLaren - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
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  46. The Familiar Face of Genocide: Internalized Oppression Among American Indians.Lisa M. Poupart - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):86-100.
    : Virtually nonexistent in traditional American Indian communities, today American Indian women and children experience family violence at rates similar to those of the dominant culture. This article explores violence within American Indian communities as an expression of internalized oppression and as an extension of Euro-American violence against American Indian nations.
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  47. Feminist Reactions to the Contemporary Security Regime.Iris Marion Young - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):223 - 231.
    : The essay theorizes the logic of masculinist protection as an apparently benign form of male domination. It then argues that authoritarian government is often justified through a logic of masculinist protection, and that this is the form of justification for the security regime that has emerged in the United States since September 11, 2001. I argue that those who live under a security regime live within an oppressive protection racket. The paper ends by cautioning feminists not ourselves to adopt (...)
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  48. The Apotheosis of Home and the Maintenance of Spaces of Violence.Joshua M. Price - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):39-70.
    : The "Home" is ideologically understood as a place of safety and refuge. Such an account cloaks violence against women. The voices of battered women can disrupt that dominant construction of the space of the home, a construction typified by the work of Gaston Bachelard. The space that Bachelard presupposes and theorizes as given is in fact being-produced, cleaned, and organized by people who themselves may not find in it any solace or respite.
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  49. Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives.Renee Heberle - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (2):93-97.
  50. Book Review: Stanley G. French, Wanda Teays, and Laura M. Purdy. Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1998. [REVIEW]Renee Heberle - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (2):93-97.
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