Results for 'Rebecca Dayna Tuvel'

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  1. In Defense of Transracialism.Rebecca Tuvel - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):263-278.
    Former NAACP chapter head Rachel Dolezal's attempted transition from the white to the black race occasioned heated controversy. Her story gained notoriety at the same time that Caitlyn Jenner graced the cover of Vanity Fair, signaling a growing acceptance of transgender identity. Yet criticisms of Dolezal for misrepresenting her birth race indicate a widespread social perception that it is neither possible nor acceptable to change one's race in the way it might be to change one's sex. Considerations that support transgenderism (...)
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  2. Racial Transitions and Controversial Positions.Rebecca Tuvel - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):73-88.
    In this essay, I reply to critiques of my article “In Defense of Transracialism.” Echoing Chloë Taylor and Lewis Gordon’s remarks on the controversy over my article, I first reflect on the lack of intellectual generosity displayed in response to my paper. In reply to Kris Sealey, I next argue that it is dangerous to hinge the moral acceptability of a particular identity or practice on what she calls a collective co-signing. In reply to Sabrina Hom, I suggest that relying (...)
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  3.  50
    Sourcing Women's Ecological Knowledge: The Worry of Epistemic Objectification.Rebecca Tuvel - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (2):319-336.
    In this paper, I argue that although it is important to attend to injustices surrounding women's epistemic exclusions, it is equally important to attend to injustices surrounding women's epistemic inclusions. Partly in response to the historical exclusion of women's knowledge, there has been increasing effort among first-world actors to seek out women's knowledge. This trend is apparent in efforts to mainstream gender in climate change negotiation. Here, one is told that women's superior knowledge about how to adapt to climate change (...)
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  4.  14
    Pour défendre le transracialisme.Rebecca Tuvel - 2017 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 12 (2-3):100-119.
    REBECCA TUVEL,VINCENT DUHAMEL | : La tentative de l’ancienne cheffe d’une section de la NAACP 1 Rachel Dolezal de passer de la race blanche à la race noire a occasionné une intense controverse. Son histoire est devenue célèbre au même moment où Caitlyn Jenner2 faisait la couverture de Vanity Fair, signe d’une acceptation grandissante de l’identité trans. Pourtant, les critiques adressées à Dolezal pour avoir caché sa race natale indiquent qu’il existe une perception sociale largement répandue selon laquelle (...)
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  5.  11
    Against the Use of Knowledge Gained From Animal Experimentation.Rebecca Tuvel - 2015 - Societies 1 (5).
    While there exists considerable protest against the use of animals in experimentation, less protest is voiced against the use of knowledge gained from animal experimentation. Pulling from arguments against the use of Nazi data, I suggest that using knowledge gained from animal experimentation both disrespects animal victims and sustains the practice. It is thus pro tanto morally wrong.
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  6.  17
    Commentary on Hasana Sharp's Spinoza and the Politics of Renaturalization[REVIEW]Rebecca Tuvel - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (2):221-228.
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  7.  33
    Mick Smith. Against Ecological Sovereignty: Ethics, Biopolitics, and Saving the Natural World. [REVIEW]Rebecca Tuvel - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):212-215.
  8.  71
    The Case for Feminism.Rebecca Tuvel - 2020 - In College Ethics: A Reader on Moral Issues that Affect You,.
  9.  18
    The Ethics of Captivity Ed. By Lori Gruen. [REVIEW]Rebecca Tuvel - 2016 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 6 (1):133-136.
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  10.  14
    Where the Wild Child Is.Rebecca Tuvel - 2013 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 3 (2):186-192.
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  11.  4
    New Forms of Revolt: Kristeva’s Intimate Politics.Sarah Hansen & Rebecca Tuvel (eds.) - 2017 - SUNY Press.
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  12.  12
    New Forms of Revolt: Essays on Kristeva's Intimate Politics Ed. By Sarah K. Hansen and Rebecca Tuvel.Emilia Angelova - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (1):159-165.
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  13.  2
    New Forms of Revolt: Essays on Kristeva’s Intimate Politics, Eds. Sarah K. Hansen and Rebecca Tuvel[REVIEW]Emilia Angelova - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (1):159-165.
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  14.  39
    Race and Method.Tina Fernandes Botts - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):51-72.
    Methodological tools for doing philosophy that take into account the historical context of the phenomenon under consideration are arguably better suited for examining questions of race and gender than acontextual or ahistorical methodological tools. Accordingly, Rebecca Tuvel’s “defense” of so-called transracialism arguably veers off track to the extent that it relies on acontextual and ahistorical tools. While Tuvel argues, largely relying on such tools, that so-called transracialism is both metaphysically possible and ethically permissible, from a perspective that (...)
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  15.  30
    Engaging with Race Theory.Sabrina L. Hom - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):31-50.
    Rebecca Tuvel’s controversial “In Defense of Transracialism” has been criticized for a lack of engagement with critical race theory. Disengagement with salient material on race is a consistent feature of the philosophical conversation out of which it arises. In this article, I trace the origins of feminist philosophy’s disengaged and distorted view of “transracialism” and racial passing through the work of Janice Raymond, Christine Overall, and Cressida Heyes, and consider some of the relevant work on passing that is (...)
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  16.  69
    Thinking Through Rejections and Defenses of Transracialism.Lewis R. Gordon - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):11-19.
    This article explores several philosophical questions raised by Rebecca Tuvel’s controversial article, “In Defense of Transracialism.” Drawing upon work on the concept of bad faith, including its form as “disciplinary decadence,” this discussion raises concerns of constructivity and its implications and differences in intersections of race and gender.
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  17.  29
    On Intellectual Generosity.Chloë Taylor - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (1):3-10.
    In this response I compare Rebecca Tuvel’s article, “In Defense of Transracialism,” to several other recent examples of philosophical and social justice scholarship in which authors draw comparisons between diverse identities and oppressions, and draw ethical and political conclusions about experiences that are not necessarily their own. I ask what methodological or authorial differences can explain the dramatically different reception of these works compared to Tuvel’s, and whether these differences in reception were justified. In this response I (...)
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  18. When One Size Does Not Fit All: A Problem of Fit Rather Than Failure for Voluntary Management Standards. [REVIEW]Dayna Simpson, Damien Power & Robert Klassen - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):85-95.
    Voluntary management standards for social and environmental performance ideally help to define and improve firms’ related capabilities. These standards, however, have largely failed to improve such performance as intended. Over-emphasis on institutional factors leading to adoption of these standards has neglected the role of firms’ existing capabilities. External pressures can drive firms to adopt standards more than their technical capacity to employ them. This can lead to problems of “fit” between institutional requirements and a firm’s existing capabilities . We describe (...)
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  19.  21
    Together and Apart: Exploring Structure of the Corporate–NPO Relationship.Dayna Simpson, Kathryn Lefroy & Yelena Tsarenko - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):297-311.
    Financially significant relationships between corporations and non-profit organizations have increased in recent years. NPOs offer access to interests and ideologies that are lacking within most for-profit organizations. These partnerships form a unique bridge between for-profit and non-profit goals and offer significant potential to produce innovative ways of “doing business by doing good.” Exploration of the structural implications of these relationships, however, has been limited. The potential for ideological imbalance in these relationships, particularly for the NPO, has been poorly described. We (...)
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  20.  60
    Postcolonial Hospitality: The Immigrant as Guest.Dayna Oscherwitz & Mireille Rosello - 2004 - Substance 33 (2):161.
  21.  18
    Together and Apart: Exploring Structure of the Corporate–NPO Relationship. [REVIEW]Dayna Simpson, Kathryn Lefroy & Yelena Tsarenko - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):297 - 311.
    Financially significant relationships between corporations and non-profit organizations (NPOs) have increased in recent years. NPOs offer access to interests and ideologies that are lacking within most forprofit organizations. These partnerships form a unique bridge between for-profit and non-profit goals and offer significant potential to produce innovative ways of "doing business by doing good." Exploration of the structural implications of these relationships, however, has been limited. The potential for ideological imbalance in these relationships, particularly for the NPO, has been poorly described. (...)
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  22.  31
    Race, Religion, and Informed Consent - Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
    Patients belonging to ethnic, racial, and religious minorities have been all but excluded from the legal academy's on-going conversation about informed consent. This article repairs that egregious omission. It begins by observing the narrowing of ethical justifications that underlie our informed consent law, tracing the ethical literature from the ancients to modern formulations of autonomy-centered models. Next, this article reviews the vast body of empirical data available in social science literature, that demonstrates how distinct from the autonomy model the broad (...)
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  23.  14
    Next Steps in Health Reform: Hospitals, Medicaid Expansion, and Racial Equity.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (4):906-912.
    The confluence of racial unrest and Medicaid expansion in Virginia should inspire a national reimagining of how health care can contribute to health equity. Hospitals in particular can leverage their role as economic drivers in communities to equalize health and social outcomes for all. The urgent need for innovative opioid intervention presents a fertile proving ground for new ways that hospitals can act to reduce the impact of racial inequity. Inspired by the role hospitals played to achieve desegregation during the (...)
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  24.  4
    Race, Religion, and Informed Consent — Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
    Patients belonging to ethnic, racial, and religious minorities have been all but excluded from the legal academy’s ongoing conversation about informed consent. Perhaps this is just as well, since the conversation appears to have concluded that the doctrine has failed to serve as a meaningful regulation of clinical relationships. Informed consent does not operate in practice the way it was intended in theory. More than a decade ago, Peter Schuck noted the “informed consent gap” that distinguishes the “proper” law of (...)
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  25.  17
    “Gender-Benders”: Sex and Law in the Constitution of Polluted Bodies. [REVIEW]Dayna Nadine Scott - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (3):241-265.
    This paper explores how law might conceive of the injury or harm of endocrine disruption as it applies to an aboriginal community experiencing chronic chemical pollution. The effect of the pollution in this case is not only gendered, but gendering: it seems to be causing the ‘production’ of two girl babies for every boy born on the reserve. This presents an opening to interrogate how law is implicated in the constitution of not just gender but sex. The analysis takes an (...)
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  26. Appendix to Rebecca Kukla and Mark Lance 'Yo!' And 'Lo!': The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons.Greg Restall, Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance - manuscript
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  27.  9
    Housing: A Case for The Medicalization of Poverty.B. Cameron Webb & Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (3):588-594.
    “Medicalization” has been a contentious notion since its introduction centuries ago. While some scholars lamented a medical overreach into social domains, others hailed its promise for social justice advocacy. Against the backdrop of a growing commitment to health equity across the nation, this article reviews historical interpretations of medicalization, offers an application of the term to non-biologic risk factors for disease, and presents the case of housing the demonstrate the great potential of medicalizing poverty.
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  28.  14
    Priming Performance-Related Concerns Induces Task-Related Mind-Wandering.Megan L. Jordano & Dayna R. Touron - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 55:126-135.
  29. Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are entitled (...)
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  30.  3
    Mediating Students’ Fixation with Grades in an Inquiry-Based Undergraduate Biology Course.Dayna Jean DeFeo, Trang C. Tran & Sarah Gerken - 2021 - Science & Education 30 (1):81-102.
    The paper analyzes focus group data to explore student perceptions of an inquiry-based undergraduate biology course. Though the course was designed to mimic the scientific process by incorporating uncertainty, peer review, and self-reflection, students came to class focused on getting As and with a developed schema for didactic instruction and passive learning. They perceived the autonomy and self-directedness of the learning experience as a threat to their grades, and responded with strategies that protected their grades and ego, but were deleterious (...)
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  31.  25
    Possessing Spirits and Healing Selves: Embodiment and Transformation in an Afro-Brazilian Religion. Rebecca Seligman. Palgrave McMillan. 2014. Xiv+209 Pp. [REVIEW]Rebecca Lester - 2015 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 43 (4):E25-E26.
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  32. Two Kinds of Unknowing.Rebecca Mason - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):294-307.
    Miranda Fricker claims that a “gap” in collective hermeneutical resources with respect to the social experiences of marginalized groups prevents members of those groups from understanding their own experiences (Fricker 2007). I argue that because Fricker misdescribes dominant hermeneutical resources as collective, she fails to locate the ethically bad epistemic practices that maintain gaps in dominant hermeneutical resources even while alternative interpretations are in fact offered by non-dominant discourses. Fricker's analysis of hermeneutical injustice does not account for the possibility that (...)
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  33.  83
    Missed Revolutions, Non-Revolutions, Revolutions to Come: An Encounter with Mourning Sickness: Hegel and the French Revolution , Rebecca Comay.Rebecca Comay In Conversation With Joshua Nichols - 2012 - PhaenEx 7 (1):309-346.
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  34. Infant Artificial Language Learning and Language Acquisition.Rebecca L. Gómez & LouAnn Gerken - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):178-186.
  35. Dworkin on Dementia: Elegant Theory, Questionable Policy.Rebecca Dresser - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (6):32-38.
  36. The Metaphysics of Social Kinds.Rebecca Mason - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (12):841-850.
    It is a truism that humans are social animals. Thus, it is no surprise that we understand the world, each other, and ourselves in terms of social kinds such as money and marriage, war and women, capitalists and cartels, races, recessions, and refugees. Social kinds condition our expectations, inform our preferences, and guide our behavior. Despite the prevalence and importance of social kinds, philosophy has historically devoted relatively little attention to them. With few exceptions, philosophers have given pride of place (...)
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  37.  21
    Artificial Grammar Learning by 1-Year-Olds Leads to Specific and Abstract Knowledge.Rebecca L. Gomez & LouAnn Gerken - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):109-135.
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  38.  49
    To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent.Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event?especially subjective self-appraised symptoms?can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information. This essay argues (...)
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  39.  78
    Affect-Biased Attention as Emotion Regulation.Rebecca M. Todd, William A. Cunningham, Adam K. Anderson & Evan Thompson - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (7):365-372.
  40. The Fallacy of the Principle of Procreative Beneficence.Rebecca Bennett - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (5):265-273.
    The claim that we have a moral obligation, where a choice can be made, to bring to birth the 'best' child possible, has been highly controversial for a number of decades. More recently Savulescu has labelled this claim the Principle of Procreative Beneficence. It has been argued that this Principle is problematic in both its reasoning and its implications, most notably in that it places lower moral value on the disabled. Relentless criticism of this proposed moral obligation, however, has been (...)
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  41.  27
    Deleuze and Research Methodologies.Rebecca Coleman & Jessica Ringrose (eds.) - 2013 - Edinburgh University Press.
    This book brings together international academics from a range of Social Science and Humanities disciplines to reflect on how Deleuze's philosophy is opening up and shaping methodologies and practices of empirical research.
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  42.  45
    Mass Hysteria: Medicine, Culture, and Mothers' Bodies.Rebecca Kukla - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Mass Hysteria examines the medical and cultural practices surrounding pregnancy, new motherhood, and infant feeding. Late eighteenth century transformations in these practices reshaped mothers' bodies, and contemporary norms and routines of prenatal care and early motherhood have inherited the legacy of that era. As a result, mothers are socially positioned in ways that can make it difficult for them to establish and maintain healthy and safe boundaries and appropriate divisions between public and private space.
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  43.  20
    Serial Participation and the Ethics of Phase 1 Healthy Volunteer Research.Rebecca L. Walker, Marci D. Cottingham & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):83-114.
    Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials—which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects—appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase (...)
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  44.  28
    Philosophy of Mind in the Early Modern and Modern Ages: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 4.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2019 - London and New York: Routledge.
    The early modern period is arguably the most pivotal of all in the study of the mind, teeming with a variety of conceptions of mind. Some of these posed serious questions for assumptions about the nature of the mind, many of which still depended on notions of the soul and God. It is an era that witnessed the emergence of theories and arguments that continue to animate the study of philosophy of mind, such as dualism, vitalism, materialism, and idealism. -/- (...)
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  45.  53
    “Author TBD”: Radical Collaboration in Contemporary Biomedical Research.Rebecca Kukla - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (5):845-858.
  46. Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    In Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems, leading figures in the fields of virtue ethics and ethics come together to present the first ...
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  47.  63
    Open‐Mindedness: An Intellectual Virtue in the Pursuit of Knowledge and Understanding.Rebecca M. Taylor - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (5):599-618.
    Open-mindedness is widely valued as an important intellectual virtue. Definitional debates about open-mindedness have focused on whether open-minded believers must possess a particular first-order attitude toward their beliefs or a second-order attitude toward themselves as believers, taking it for granted that open-mindedness is motivated by the pursuit of propositional knowledge. In this article, Rebecca Taylor develops an alternative to knowledge-centered accounts of open-mindedness. Drawing on recent work in epistemology that reclaims understanding as a primary epistemic good, Taylor argues for (...)
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  48.  11
    Simultaneous Segmentation and Generalisation of Non-Adjacent Dependencies From Continuous Speech.Rebecca L. A. Frost & Padraic Monaghan - 2016 - Cognition 147:70-74.
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  49. To Be Real Telling the Truth and Changing the Face of Feminism.Rebecca Walker - 1995
  50.  42
    Moral Responsibility for (Un)Healthy Behaviour.Rebecca C. H. Brown - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (11):695-698.
    Combatting chronic, lifestyle-related disease has become a healthcare priority in the developed world. The role personal responsibility should play in healthcare provision has growing pertinence given the growing significance of individual lifestyle choices for health. Media reporting focussing on the ‘bad behaviour’ of individuals suffering lifestyle-related disease, and policies aimed at encouraging ‘responsibilisation’ in healthcare highlight the importance of understanding the scope of responsibility ascriptions in this context. Research into the social determinants of health and psychological mechanisms of health behaviour (...)
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