Results for '*Consciousness Disturbances'

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  1. Disturbances of Consciousness and Sleep-Wake Functions.Claudio Bassetti - 2001 - In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 192-210.
  2. Disturbances of Time Consciousness From a Phenomenological and Neuroscientific Perspective.Kai Vogeley & Christian Kupke - 2006 - Schizophrenia Bulletin 33 (1):157-165.
    The subjective experience of time is a fundamental constituent of human consciousness and can be disturbed under conditions of mental disorders such as schizophrenia or affective disorders. Besides the scientific domain of psychiatry, time consciousness is a topic that has been extensively studied both by theoretical philosophy and cognitive neuroscience. It can be shown that both approaches exemplified by the philosophical analysis of time consciousness and the neuroscientific theory of cross-temporal contingencies as the neurophysiological basis of human consciousness implemented in (...)
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  3.  30
    The Three Vectors of Consciousness and Their Disturbances After Brain Injury.George P. Prigatano & Sterling C. Johnson - 2003 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 13 (1):13-29.
  4.  19
    Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective.Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken - 2004 - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.
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  5. Disturbances of Visual Information Processing in Early States of Psychosis and Experimental Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Altered States of Consciousness.Dagmar Koethe, Christoph W. Gerth, Miriam A. Neatby, Anita Haensel, Martin Thies, Udo Schneider, Hinderk M. Emrich, Joachim Klosterkötter, Frauke Schultze-Lutter & F. Markus Leweke - 2006 - Schizophrenia Research 88 (1-3):142-150.
     
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  6.  11
    Disturbances of Consciousness in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Associated with Alteration in Nicotinic Receptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex.G. Ballard Clive, A. Jennifer, Piggott Margaret, Johnson Mary, O'Brien John, McKeith Ian, Clive Holmes, Peter Lantos, Evelyn Jaros & Robert Perry - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3).
  7. Disturbances of Consciousness in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Associated with Alteration in Nicotinic Receptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex.G. Ballard Clive, A. Court Jennifer, Piggott Margaret, Johnson Mary, O’Brien John, McKeith Ian, Holmes Clive, Lantos Peter, Jaros Evelyn, Perry Robert & E. Perry - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):461-474.
  8. Language, Language Disturbances, and the Texture of Consciousness.Alfred Schutz - forthcoming - Social Research.
     
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  9.  21
    Disturbances of Conscious in Dementia with Lewy Bodies Assocated with Alterantion in Nicotonic Receoptor Binding in the Temporal Cortex.Clive Ballard - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):461-474.
    Disturbances of consciousness, including fluctuations in attention and awareness, are a common and clinically important symptom in dementia with Lewy bodies . In the present study we investigate potential mechanisms of such disturbances of consciousness in a clinicopathological study evaluating specific components of the cholinergic system. [3H]Epibatidine binding to the high-affinity nicotinic receptor in the temporal cortex differentiated DLB cases with and without DOC, being 62–66% higher in those with DOC . The were no differences between DLB patients (...)
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  10.  5
    Consciousness and Disturbances of Consciousness.D. von Cramon - 1978 - Journal of Neurology 219:1-13.
  11.  52
    When Self-Consciousness Breaks: Alien Voices and Inserted Thoughts.G. Lynn Stephens & George Graham - 2000 - MIT Press.
  12. Psychobiology of Altered States of Consciousness.Dieter Vaitl, Niels Birbaumer, John Gruzelier, Graham A. Jamieson, Boris Kotchoubey, Andrea Kübler, Dietrich Lehmann, Wolfgang H. R. Miltner, Ulrich Ott, Peter Pütz, Gebhard Sammer, Inge Strauch, Ute Strehl, Jiri Wackermann & Thomas Weiss - 2005 - Psychological Bulletin 131 (1):98-127.
  13. Autobiographical Memory and Autonoetic Consciousness in a Case of Semantic Dementia.Pascale Piolino, Serge Belliard, Béatrice Desgranges, Mélisa Perron & Francis Eustache - 2003 - Cognitive Neuropsychology 20 (7):619-639.
  14. The Neurology of Impaired Consciousness: Challenges for Cognitive Neuroscience.Nicholas D. Schiff - 2004 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press. pp. 1121-1132.
  15. Consciousness Disorders in Schizophrenia: A Forgotten Land for Psychopathology.José M. Villagrán - 2003 - International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy 3 (2):209-234.
  16.  49
    Assessing Level of Consciousness and Cognitive Changes From Vegetative State to Full Recovery.Tristan Bekinschtein, Cecilia Tiberti, Jorge Niklison, Mercedes Tamashiro, Melania Ron, Silvina Carpintiero, Mirta Villarreal, Cecilia Forcato, Ramon Leiguarda & Facundo Manes - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):307-322.
  17. Consciousness.Martha J. Farah - 2001 - In B. Rapp (ed.), The Handbook of Cognitive Neuropsychology: What Deficits Reveal About the Human Mind. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
     
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  18.  33
    Rehabilitative Management of Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: Grand Rounds.Joseph T. Giacino & Charlotte T. Trott - 2004 - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation 19 (3):254-265.
  19.  17
    Multimodal Neuroimaging Approaches to Disorders of Consciousness.Nicholas D. Schiff - 2006 - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 21 (5):388-397.
  20.  13
    Conceptual Dilemmas in Evaluating Individuals with Severely Impaired Consciousness.Wing K. Ng, Risa N. Thompson, Stuart A. Yablon & Mark Sherer - 2001 - Brain Injury 15 (7):639-643.
  21. Subtle is the Lord: The Relationship Between Consciousness, the Unconscious, and the Executive Control Network (ECN) of the Brain.Fred M. Levin & Colwyn Trevarthen - 2000 - Annual of Psychoanalysis 28:105-125.
     
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  22.  79
    The Multiplicity of Consciousness and the Emergence of the Self.Gerard O'Brien & Jonathan Opie - 2003 - In A. S. David & T. T. J. Kircher (eds.), The Self and Schizophrenia: A Neuropsychological Perspective. Cambridge University Press. pp. 107--120.
    I look out the window and I think that the garden looks nice and the grass looks cool, but the
    thoughts of Eammon Andrews come into my mind.
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  23.  36
    Synaptic Perturbation and Consciousness.Stephen L. Thaler - 2014 - International Journal of Machine Consciousness 6 (2):75-107.
    By allowing one artificial neural network to govern the synaptic noise injected into another based upon its appraisal of patterns nucleating from such disturbances, a contemplative form of artificial intelligence is formed whose creativity and pattern delivery closely parallels that of human cognition. Drawing upon the theory of fractional Brownian motion, we may derive an equation, verifiable through statistical mechanics, which governs both the novelty and rhythm of pattern turnover within such neural systems. Through this equation, we gain valuable (...)
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  24.  34
    Mental Structure and Self-Consciousness.Brian O'Shaughnessy - 1972 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):30-63.
    Mental health, in one awake, guarantees that person knowledge of the central phenomenon-contents of his own mind, under an adequate classificatory heading. This is the primary thesis of the paper. That knowledge is not itself a phenomenon-content, and usually is achieved in no way. Rather, it stems from the natural accessibility of mental phenomenon-contents to wakeful consciousness. More precisely, when mental normality obtains, such knowledge necessarily obtains in wakeful consciousness. This thesis conjoins a version of Cartesianism with the concepts of (...)
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  25.  14
    The Contents of Consciousness: From C to Shining C++.Michael H. Joseph & Samuel R. H. Joseph - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):188-189.
    We suggest that consciousness (C) should be addressed as a multilevel concept. We can provisionally identify at least three, rather than two, levels: Gray's system should relate at least to the lowest of these three levels. Although it is unlikely to be possible to develop a behavioural test for C, it is possible to speculate as to the evolutionary advantages offered by C and how C evolved through succeeding levels. Disturbances in the relationships between the levels of C could (...)
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  26. Delirium and Hallucinations.Heather Ashton - 2002 - In Elaine Perry, Heather Ashton & Allan Young (eds.), Neurochemistry of Consciousness: Neurotransmitters in Mind. John Benjamins. pp. 181-203.
  27.  38
    The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria.Joseph T. Giacino & Childs N. Ashwal S. - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):349-353.
  28.  12
    Memory, Autonoetic Consciousness, and the Self.Hans J. Markowitsch & Angelica Staniloiu - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (1):16-39.
    Memory is a general attribute of living species, whose diversification reflects both evolutionary and developmental processes. Episodic-autobiographical memory is regarded as the highest human ontogenetic achievement and as probably being uniquely human. EAM, autonoetic consciousness and the self are intimately linked, grounding, supporting and enriching each other’s development and cohesiveness. Their development is influenced by the socio-cultural–linguistic environment in which an individual grows up or lives. On the other hand, through language, textualization and social exchange, all three elements leak into (...)
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  29. "The Minimally Conscious State: Definition and Diagnostic Criteria": Comments and Reply.Diane Coleman, D. Alan Shewmon & J. T. Giacino - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):506-507.
  30.  59
    Schizophrenia and the Mechanisms of Conscious Integration.Giulio Srinivasan Tononi & Gerald M. Edelman - 2000 - Brain Research Reviews 31 (2):391-400.
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  31.  65
    Questions Remaining About the Minimally Conscious State.James L. Bernat - 2002 - Neurology 58 (3):337-338.
  32. Disorders of Perception and Awareness.Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press.
     
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  33.  29
    Neurophysiological Correlates of Persistent Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Erik J. Kobylarz & Nicholas D. Schiff - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):323-332.
  34. Diagnostic and Prognostic Guidelines for the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Joseph T. Giacino & Kathleen Kalmar - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):166-174.
  35. Neurophysiological Patterns of Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Jean-Michel Guérit - 2005 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):357-371.
  36. Brain Processes and Phenomenal Consciousness: A New and Specific Hypothesis.Hans Flohr - 1990 - Theory and Psychology 1:245-62.
    A hypothesis on the physiological conditions for the occurrence of phenomenal states is presented. It is suggested that the presence of phenomenal states depends on the rate at which neural assemblies are formed. Unconsciousness and various disturbances of phenomenal consciousness occur if the assembly formation rate is below a certain threshold level; if this level is surpassed, phenomenal states necessarily result. A critical production rate of neural assemblies is the necessary and sufficient condition for the occurrence of phenomenal states.
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  37.  45
    Self-Consciousness and Alzheimer's Disease.Roger Gil, E. M. Arroyo-Anllo, P. Ingrand, M. Gil, J. P. Neau, C. Ornon & V. Bonnaud - 2001 - Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 104 (5):296-300.
    Gil R, Arroyo-Anllo EM, Ingrand P, Gil M, Neau JP, Ornon C, Bonnaud V. Self-consciousness and Alzheimer’s disease. Acta Neurol Scand 2001: 104: 296–300. # Munksgaard 2001. Objectives – To propose a neuropsychological study of the various aspects of self-consciousness (SC) in Alzheimer’s disease. Methods – Forty-five patients with probable mild or moderate AD were included in the study. Severity of their dementia was assessed by the Mini Mental State (MMS). Fourteen questions were prepared to evaluate SC. Results – No (...)
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  38. Material Selves: Bodies, Memory, and Autobiographical Narrating.Sidonie A. Smith - 2003 - In Gary D. Fireman, Ted E. McVay Jr & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.), Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain. Oxford University Press. pp. 86-111.
     
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  39.  6
    Visual Consciousness in Health and Disease.Andrew R. Whatham, Patrik Vuilleumier, Theodor Landis & Avinoam B. Safran - 2003 - Neurologic Clinics 21 (3):647-686.
  40.  8
    From Clumsy Failure to Skillful Fluency: A Phenomenological Analysis of and Eastern Solution to Sport’s Choking Effect.Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):397-421.
    Excellent performance in sport involves specialized and refined skills within very narrow applications. Choking throws a wrench in the works of finely tuned performances. Functionally, and reduced to its simplest expression, choking is severe underperformance when engaging already mastered skills. Choking is a complex phenomenon with many intersecting facets: its dysfunctions result from the multifaceted interaction of cognitive and psychological processes, neurophysiological mechanisms, and phenomenological dynamics. This article develops a phenomenological model that, complementing empirical and theoretical research, helps understand and (...)
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  41.  6
    The Affective Scope: Entering China's Urban Moral and Economic World Through Its Emotional Disturbances.Jean‐Baptiste Pettier - 2016 - Anthropology of Consciousness 27 (1):75-96.
    From an outsider's perspective, today's Popular China might appear as a self-confident and triumphant country. However, a large-scale examination of the country's recent moral controversies reveals a very different picture, one that has much to do with the widespread local public perception of an ongoing “moral crisis”, whose examination requires careful attention placed on the ethical and affective aspects of the everyday lives of today's Chinese people. In this article, I propose to examine the anguish that Chinese bachelor youths and (...)
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  42. Consciousness in Contemporary Science.Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.) - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    The significance of consciousness in modern science is discussed by leading authorities from a variety of disciplines. Presenting a wide-ranging survey of current thinking on this important topic, the contributors address such issues as the status of different aspects of consciousness; the criteria for using the concept of consciousness and identifying instances of it; the basis of consciousness in functional brain organization; the relationship between different levels of theoretical discourse; and the functions of consciousness.
     
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  43. Reference and Consciousness.J. Campbell - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    John Campbell investigates how consciousness of the world explains our ability to think about the world; how our ability to think about objects we can see depends on our capacity for conscious visual attention to those things. He illuminates classical problems about thought, reference, and experience by looking at the underlying psychological mechanisms on which conscious attention depends.
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  44. On a Confusion About a Function of Consciousness.Ned Block - 1995 - Brain and Behavioral Sciences 18 (2):227-–247.
    Consciousness is a mongrel concept: there are a number of very different "consciousnesses." Phenomenal consciousness is experience; the phenomenally conscious aspect of a state is what it is like to be in that state. The mark of access-consciousness, by contrast, is availability for use in reasoning and rationally guiding speech and action. These concepts are often partly or totally conflated, with bad results. This target article uses as an example a form of reasoning about a function of "consciousness" based on (...)
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  45.  70
    The Relation of Consciousness to the Material World.Max Velmans - 1995 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (3):255-265.
    Within psychology and the brain sciences, the study of consciousness and its relation to human information processing is once more a focus for productive research. However, some ancient puzzles about the nature of consciousness appear to be resistant to current empirical investigations, suggesting the need for a fundamentally different approach. In Velmans I have argued that functional accounts of the mind do not `contain' consciousness within their workings. Investigations of information processing are not investigations of consciousness as such. Given this, (...)
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  46. Consciousness, Color, and Content.Michael Tye - 2000 - MIT Press.
    A further development of Tye's theory of phenomenal consciousness along with replies to common objections.
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  47. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
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    Consciousness and Cosmos: Building an Ontological Framework.Alfredo Pereira Jr, Chris Nunn, Greg Nixon & Massimo Pregnolato - forthcoming - Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    Contemporary theories of consciousness are based on widely different concepts of its nature, most or all of which probably embody aspects of the truth about it. Starting with a concept of consciousness indicated by the phrase “the feeling of what happens” (the title of a book by Antonio Damásio), we attempt to build a framework capable of supporting and resolving divergent views. We picture consciousness in terms of Reality experiencing itself from the perspective of cognitive agents. Each conscious experience is (...)
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  49. Consciousness, Accessibility, and the Mesh Between Psychology and Neuroscience.Ned Block - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):481--548.
    How can we disentangle the neural basis of phenomenal consciousness from the neural machinery of the cognitive access that underlies reports of phenomenal consciousness? We can see the problem in stark form if we ask how we could tell whether representations inside a Fodorian module are phenomenally conscious. The methodology would seem straightforward: find the neural natural kinds that are the basis of phenomenal consciousness in clear cases when subjects are completely confident and we have no reason to doubt their (...)
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  50. Consciousness and Morality.Joshua Shepherd & Neil Levy - forthcoming - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    It is well known that the nature of consciousness is elusive, and that attempts to understand it generate problems in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, psychology, and neuroscience. Less appreciated are the important – even if still elusive – connections between consciousness and issues in ethics. In this chapter we consider three such connections. First, we consider the relevance of consciousness for questions surrounding an entity’s moral status. Second, we consider the relevance of consciousness for questions surrounding moral responsibility for action. (...)
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