Results for 'Revolution'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Inner Revolution: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Real Happiness Reviewed by Koller, John M.Inner Revolution - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (1):138-141.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - University of Chicago Press.
  3. Annaies Historiques de la Revolution Franguise, No. 275 (Janvier-Mars 1989), Paris, 92 Pp. [REVIEW]Bicentenaire de la Revolution Francaise - 1990 - History of European Ideas 12 (2):315-318.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  60
    The Structure of Moral Revolutions.Nigel Pleasants - 2018 - Social Theory and Practice 44 (4):567-592.
    In the recent and not-too-distant past many of our parents, grandparents and forbears believed that a person’s skin colour and physiognomy, gender, or sexuality licensed them being regarded and treated in ways that are now widely recognised as blatantly unjust, disrespectful, cruel and brutal. But the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries have hosted a series of radical changes in attitudes, beliefs, behaviour and institutionalised practices with regard to the fundamental moral equality of what were once seen as different “kinds of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  5. Justified Revolution in Contemporary American Democracy: A Confucian-Inspired Account.Jennifer Kling & Colin J. Lewis - 2022 - In LeLand Harper (ed.), The Crisis of American Democracy: Essays on a Failing Institution. New York, NY, USA: pp. 167-192.
    How much injustice and oppression must be tolerated before a revolution is justified? In theory, the United States’ political structure, by design, makes the question of revolution obsolete: by putting political power into the hands of the people via democratic mechanisms such as voting, the division of power among separate branches of government, and representative influence and control, there should be no need for revolution because everything the government does either has the consent of the people or (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  68
    Conceptual Revolutions.Paul Thagard - 1992 - Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  7.  56
    The Dynamics of Moral Revolutions – Prelude to Future Investigations and Interventions.Cecilie Eriksen - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):779-792.
    What drives moral revolutions like the legal abolition of slavery and women’s right to vote? The importance of having an answer to this question lies in the hope of it being able to help us create moral progress in the future. This can be changing harmful practices and traditions like honour killing, child marriage, genital mutilation and political corruption. Furthermore, a wrong or insufficient picture of the dynamics of change, held by e.g. politicians or NGOs and incorporated into laws and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Revolution in Poetic Language.Julia Kristeva - 1984 - Columbia University Press.
    Julia Kristeva. alteration has been identified, one is able to detect a similar ferment in the essential writings of other historical periods. A few definitions or clarifications are in order. That there has been a conceptual "revolution" is, 1 believe, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  9. Karl Barth Et la Théologie de la Révolution.Et la Théologie de la Révolution - 1970 - Revue de Théologie Et de Philosophie 20:401.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. On Revolution.E. J. Hobsbawm & Hanna Arendt - 1965 - History and Theory 4 (2):252.
  11.  6
    Pistols, Pills, Pork and Ploughs: The Structure of Technomoral Revolutions.Jeroen Hopster, Chirag Arora, Charlie Blunden, Cecilie Eriksen, Lily Frank, Julia Hermann, Michael Klenk, Elizabeth O'Neill & Steffen Steinert - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-33.
    The power of technology to transform religions, science, and political institutions has often been presented as nothing short of revolutionary. Does technology have a similarly transformative influence on societies’ morality? Scholars have not rigorously investigated the role of technology in moral revolutions, even though existing research on technomoral change suggests that this role may be considerable. In this paper, we explore what the role of technology in moral revolutions, understood as processes of radical group-level moral change, amounts to. We do (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Revolutions in Mathematics.Donald Gillies (ed.) - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    Social revolutions--that is critical periods of decisive, qualitative change--are a commonly acknowledged historical fact. But can the idea of revolutionary upheaval be extended to the world of ideas and theoretical debate? The publication of Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions in 1962 led to an exciting discussion of revolutions in the natural sciences. A fascinating, but little known, off-shoot of this was a debate which began in the United States in the mid-1970's as to whether the concept of revolution (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  13. The Revolution Will Not Be Optimised: Radical Enactivism, Extended Functionalism and the Extensive Mind.Michael Wheeler - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):457-472.
    Optimising the 4E revolution in cognitive science arguably requires the rejection of two guiding commitments made by orthodox thinking in the field, namely that the material realisers of cognitive states and processes are located entirely inside the head, and that intelligent thought and action are to be explained in terms of the building and manipulation of content-bearing representations. In other words, the full-strength 4E revolution would be secured only by a position that delivered externalism plus antirepresentationalism. I argue (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  14. Scientific Revolutions, Specialization and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA: Toward a New Picture of the Development of the Sciences.Politi Vincenzo - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):2267-2293.
    In his late years, Thomas Kuhn became interested in the process of scientific specialization, which does not seem to possess the destructive element that is characteristic of scientific revolutions. It therefore makes sense to investigate whether and how Kuhn’s insights about specialization are consistent with, and actually fit, his model of scientific progress through revolutions. In this paper, I argue that the transition toward a new specialty corresponds to a revolutionary change for the group of scientists involved in such a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  65
    On Revolution in Kant and Marx.Lea Ypi - 2014 - Political Theory 42 (3):262-287.
    This essay compares the thoughts of Kant and Marx on revolution. It focuses in particular on two issues: the contribution of revolutionary enthusiasm to the cause of emancipatory political agents and its educative role in illustrating the possibility of progress for future generations. In both cases, it is argued, the defence of revolution is offered in the context of illustrating the possibility of moral progress for the species, even if not for individual human beings, and brings out the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  16.  4
    The Darwinian Revolution.Michael Ruse - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    What is the Darwinian revolution and why is it important for philosophers? These are the questions tackled in this Element. In four sections, the topics covered are the story of the revolution, the question of whether it really was a revolution, the nature of the revolution, and the implications for philosophy, both epistemology and ethics.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  17. Revolution and History in Walter Benjamin: A Conceptual Analysis.Alison Ross - 2019 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    This book places Benjamin’s writing on revolution in the context of his conception of historical knowledge. The fundamental problem that faces any analysis of Benjamin’s approach to revolution is that he deploys notions that belong to the domain of individual experience. His theory of modernity with its emphasis on the disintegration of collective experience further aggravates the problem. Benjamin himself understood the problem of revolution to be primarily that of the conceptualization of collective experience (its possibility and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Reflections on the Revolution in France.Edmund Burke - 2009 - London: Oxford University Press.
    This new and up-to-date edition of a book that has been central to political philosophy, history, and revolutionary thought for two hundred years offers readers a dire warning of the consequences that follow the mismanagement of change. Written for a generation presented with challenges of terrible proportions--the Industrial, American, and French Revolutions, to name the most obvious--Burke's Reflections of the Revolution in France displays an acute awareness of how high political stakes can be, as well as a keen ability (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   142 citations  
  19.  3
    Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science.Mary B. Hesse - 1980 - Harvester Press.
  20.  45
    Beauty & Revolution in Science.James W. McAllister - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
  21. Revolution and Intervention.Massimo Renzo - 2020 - Noûs 54 (1):533–253.
    Provided that traditional jus ad bellum principles are fulfilled, military humanitarian intervention to stop large scale violations of human rights (such as genocide, crimes against humanity or war crimes) is widely regarded as morally permissible. In cases of “supreme humanitarian emergency”, not only are the victims morally permitted to rebel, but other states are also permitted to militarily intervene. Things are different if the human rights violations in question fall short of supreme humanitarian emergency. Because of the importance of respecting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Cybernetic Revolution and Forthcoming Technological Transformations (The Development of the Leading Technologies in the Light of the Theory of Production Revolutions).Leonid Grinin & Anton Grinin - 2015 - In Leonid Grinin & Andrey Korotayev (eds.), Evolution: From Big Bang to Nanorobots. Volgograd,Russia: Uchitel Publishing House. pp. 251-330.
    The article analyzes the technological shifts which took place in the second half of the 20th and early 21st centuries and forecasts the main shifts in the next half a century. On the basis of the analysis of the latest achievements in inno-vative technological directions and also on the basis of the opportunities pro-vided by the theory of production revolutions the authors present a detailed analysis of the latest production revolution which is denoted as ‘Сybernetic’. The authors give some (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23. The Computer Revolution in Philosophy: Philosophy, Science, and Models of Mind.Aaron Sloman - 1978 - Hassocks UK: Harvester Press.
    Extract from Hofstadter's revew in Bulletin of American Mathematical Society : http://www.ams.org/journals/bull/1980-02-02/S0273-0979-1980-14752-7/S0273-0979-1980-14752-7.pdf -/- "Aaron Sloman is a man who is convinced that most philosophers and many other students of mind are in dire need of being convinced that there has been a revolution in that field happening right under their noses, and that they had better quickly inform themselves. The revolution is called "Artificial Intelligence" (Al)-and Sloman attempts to impart to others the "enlighten- ment" which he clearly regrets (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   142 citations  
  24. Revolution at Point Zero—Housework, Reproduction and Feminist Struggle.Silvia Federici - 2012
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  25. Kuhnian Revolutions Revisited.K. Brad Wray - 2007 - Synthese 158 (1):61-73.
    I re-examine Kuhn’s account of scientific revolutions. I argue that the sorts of events Kuhn regards as scientific revolutions are a diverse lot, differing in significant ways. But, I also argue that Kuhn does provide us with a principled way to distinguish revolutionary changes from non-revolutionary changes in science. Scientific revolutions are those changes in science that (1) involve taxonomic changes, (2) are precipitated by disappointment with existing practices, and (3) cannot be resolved by appealing to shared standards. I argue (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  26.  67
    Revolutions: A Very Short Introduction.Jack A. Goldstone - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Revolutions have shaped world politics for the last three hundred years. This volume shows why revolutions occur, how they unfold, and where they created democracies and dictatorships. Jack A. Goldstone presents the history of revolutions from America and France to the collapse of the Soviet Union, 'People Power' revolutions, and the Arab revolts.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  27. Scientific Revolutions and the Explosion of Scientific Evidence.Ludwig Fahrbach - 2017 - Synthese 194 (12):5039-5072.
    Scientific realism, the position that successful theories are likely to be approximately true, is threatened by the pessimistic induction according to which the history of science is full of suc- cessful, but false theories. I aim to defend scientific realism against the pessimistic induction. My main thesis is that our current best theories each enjoy a very high degree of predictive success, far higher than was enjoyed by any of the refuted theories. I support this thesis by showing that both (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  28. Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science.Mary Hesse - 1982 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (3):331-334.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  29.  23
    Revolution Against Non-Violent Oppression.Zsolt Kapelner - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (4):445-461.
    Oppressive governments that use violence against citizens, e.g. murder and torture, are usually thought of as liable to armed revolutionary attack by the oppressed population. But oppression may be non-violent. A government may greatly restrict political rights and personal autonomy by using surveillance, propaganda, manipulation, strategic detention and similar techniques without ever resorting to overt violence. Can such regimes be liable to revolutionary attack? A widespread view is that the answer is ‘no’. On this view, unless a government is or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30.  23
    Political Revolution As Moral Risk.Patrick Taylor Smith - 2018 - The Monist 101 (2):199-215.
    Questions about dirty hands have often focused on legitimate, secure leaders deciding whether to violate important deontological principles or the rules of interpersonal morality. The purpose of this paper is to show that revolutionaries have dirty hands; revolutionaries do wrong by engaging in unilateral usurpation of the existing system with the hope that latter benefits will justify their actions. Yet, once the revolution securely generates improvements for the common good, the initial usurpation becomes increasingly irrelevant to judgments of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  1
    The Quantum Revolution in Philosophy.Richard Healey - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    Quantum theory launched a revolution in physics. But we have yet to understand the revolution's significance for philosophy. Richard Healey opens a path to such understanding. The first part of this book offers a self-contained but opinionated introduction to quantum theory. The second part assesses the theory's philosophical significance.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  32.  55
    Technological Revolutions: Ethics and Policy in the Dark.Nick Bostrom - 2007
    Technological revolutions are among the most important things that happen to humanity. Ethical assessment in the incipient stages of a potential technological revolution faces several difficulties, including the unpredictability of their long‐term impacts, the problematic role of human agency in bringing them about, and the fact that technological revolutions rewrite not only the material conditions of our existence but also reshape culture and even – perhaps – human nature. This essay explores some of these difficulties and the challenges they (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33.  12
    Permanent Revolution In Science: A Quantum Epistemology.Steve Fuller - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 51 (1):48-57.
    This article is the preface to the Russian translation of my Kuhn vs Popper. I use it as an opportunity to re-examine the difference between Kuhn and Popper on the nature of ‘revolutions’ in science. Kuhn is rightly seen as a ‘reluctant revolutionary’ and Popper a ‘permanent revolutionary’. In this respect, Kuhn sticks to the original medieval meaning of ‘revolution’ as restoration of a natural order, whereas Popper adopts the more modern meaning of ‘revolution’ that comes into fashion (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Ecological Revolutions: Nature, Gender, and Science in New England.Carolyn Merchant - 1989 - Unc Press Books.
    With the arrival of European explorers and settlers during the seventeenth century, Native American ways of life and the environment itself underwent radical alterations as human relationships to the land and ways of thinking about nature all changed. This colonial ecological revolution held sway until the nineteenth century, when New England's industrial production brought on a capitalist revolution that again remade the ecology, economy, and conceptions of nature in the region. In Ecological Revolutions, Carolyn Merchant analyzes these two (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  35. Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science.Mary Hesse - 1980 - Philosophy 56 (217):430-431.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  36. Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science.Mary Hesse - 1984 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (1):97-98.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  37. No Revolution Necessary: Neural Mechanisms for Economics: Carl F. Craver and Anna Alexandrova.Carl F. Craver - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):381-406.
    We argue that neuroeconomics should be a mechanistic science. We defend this view as preferable both to a revolutionary perspective, according to which classical economics is eliminated in favour of neuroeconomics, and to a classical economic perspective, according to which economics is insulated from facts about psychology and neuroscience. We argue that, like other mechanistic sciences, neuroeconomics will earn its keep to the extent that it either reconfigures how economists think about decision-making or how neuroscientists think about brain mechanisms underlying (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  38.  2
    Molecular Revolution in Brazil.Felix Guattari & Suely Rolnik - 2007 - Semiotext(E).
    Molecular Revolution in BrazilFélix Guattari and Suely Rolniktranslated by KarelClapshow and Brian HolmesYes, I believe that there is a multiple people, a people of mutants, apeople of potentialities that appears and disappears, that is embodied in social, literary, andmusical events.... I think that we're in a period of productivity, proliferation, creation, utterlyfabulous revolutions from the viewpoint of this emergence of a people. That's molecular revolution:it isn't a slogan or a program, it's something that I feel, that I live....--from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  39.  63
    REC: Revolution Effected by Clarification.Daniel D. Hutto - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):377-391.
    This paper shows how a radical approach to enactivism provides a way of clarifying and unifying different varieties of enactivism and enactivist-friendly approaches so as to provide a genuine alternative to classical cognitivism. Section 1 reminds readers of the broad church character of the enactivism framework. Section 2 explicates how radical enactivism is best understood not as a kind of enactivism per se but as a programme for radicalizing and consolidating the many different enactivist offerings. The main work of radical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  40.  28
    Revolution and Progress in Medicine.William Goodwin - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (1):25-39.
    This paper adapts Kuhn’s conceptual framework to developmental episodes in the theory and practice of medicine. Previous attempts to understand the reception of Ignaz Semmelweis’s work on puerperal fever in Kuhnian terms are used as a starting point. The author identifies some limitations of these attempts and proposes a new way of understanding the core Kuhnian notions of “paradigm,” “progress,” and “revolution” in the context of a socially embedded technoscience such as medicine.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  3
    The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen.Kwame Anthony Appiah - 2010 - New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company.
    K. Anthony Appiah, the author of the internationally best-selling Cosmopolitanism, analyzes what causes societies to end cruelty and injustices - such as slavery, foot binding, or honor killing. Can a government through its laws halt egregious violations of human decency and can mere moral instruction bring an end to human suffering? No, says Appiah, demonstrating how reform succeeds only when it enlists the primal human sense of honor. When it comes to morality, honor is the lever arm that connects what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  42.  53
    The Historiography of Scientific Revolutions: A Philosophical Reflection.Yafeng Shan - forthcoming - In Mauro L. Condé & Marlon Salomon (eds.), Handbook of the Historiography of Science. Cham: Springer.
    Scientific revolution has been one of the most controversial topics in the history and philosophy of science. Yet it has been no consensus on what is the best unit of analysis in the historiography of scientific revolutions. Nor is there a consensus on what best explains the nature of scientific revolutions. This chapter provides a critical examination of the historiography of scientific revolutions. It begins with a brief introduction to the historical development of the concept of scientific revolution, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Velvet Revolution at the Synchrotron: Biology, Physics, and Change in Science.Park Doing - 2009 - MIT Press.
    Change in scientific practice and its implications for the status of scientific claims, examined through an analysis of three episodes at a synchrotron laboratory. After World War II, particle physics became a dominant research discipline in American academia. At many universities, alumni of the Manhattan Project and of Los Alamos were granted resources to start programs of high-energy physics built around the promise of a new and more powerful particle accelerator, the synchrotron. The synchrotron was also a source of very (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44.  53
    The Revolution of Hope: Toward a Humanized Technology.Erich Fromm - 1968 - New York: Harper & Row.
    Publisher's Foreword As the present book is reissued, The American Mental Health Foundation celebrates its 86th anniversary. Organized in 1924, AMHF is ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  45.  15
    Revolution in the Event: The Problem of Kairós.Roland Boer - 2013 - Theory, Culture and Society 30 (2):116-134.
    This article undertakes a dual task. The first is to argue that the various positions of major Marxist thinkers on revolution may be gathered under the common framework of kairós, understood as a resolutely temporal term relating to the critical time, the opportune moment that appears unexpectedly and must be seized. The second task is to question the nature of kairós in terms of its biblical, class and economic residues. An investigation of the use of the term in classical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  46.  87
    Redefining Revolutions.Andrew Aberdein - 2018 - In Moti Mizrahi (ed.), The Kuhnian image of science: Time for a decisive transformation? London: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 133–154.
    In their account of theory change in logic, Aberdein and Read distinguish 'glorious' from 'inglorious' revolutions--only the former preserves all 'the key components of a theory' [1]. A widespread view, expressed in these terms, is that empirical science characteristically exhibits inglorious revolutions but that revolutions in mathematics are at most glorious [2]. Here are three possible responses: 0. Accept that empirical science and mathematics are methodologically discontinuous; 1. Argue that mathematics can exhibit inglorious revolutions; 2. Deny that inglorious revolutions are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism: The Genesis of Modern German Political Thought, 1790-1800.Frederick Beiser - 1992 - Philosophical Review 103 (1):192-194.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  48.  59
    Scientific Revolutions.Ian Hacking (ed.) - 1981 - Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together important writings not easily available elsewhere, this volume provides a convenient and stimulating overview of recent work in the philosophy of science. The contributors include Paul Feyerabend, Ian Hacking, T.S. Kuhn, Imre Lakatos, Laurens Laudan, Karl Popper, Hilary Putnam, and Dudley Shapere. In addition, Hacking provides an introductory essay and a selective bibliography.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  49. The Revolution in Anthropology.I. C. Jarvie - 1964 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (58):143-150.
  50.  20
    Revolution in Psychology: Alienation to Emancipation.Ian Parker - 2007 - Pluto Press.
    Psychology is meant to help people cope with the afflictions of modern society. But how useful is it? Ian Parker argues that current psychological practice has become part of the problem rather than the solution. Ideal for undergraduates, this book unravels the discipline to reveal the conformist assumptions that underlie its theory and practice. Psychology focuses on the happiness of "the individual." Yet it neglects the fact that personal experience depends on social and political surroundings. Parker argues that a new (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000