Results for 'Duncan C. Stewart'

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  1.  12
    Complicating Aesthetic Environmentalism: Four Criticisms of Aesthetic Motivations for Environmental Action.Duncan C. Stewart & Taylor N. Johnson - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (4):441-451.
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  2.  8
    Traits and Motives: Toward an Integration of Two Traditions in Personality Research.David G. Winter, Oliver P. John, Abigail J. Stewart, Eva C. Klohnen & Lauren E. Duncan - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (2):230-250.
  3. Conscious Matter, or, the Physical and the Psychical Universally in Causal Connection.W. Stewart Duncan - 1881
     
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  4.  20
    Anna Marmodoro, Ed. , The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations . Reviewed By.Duncan C. MacLean - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (5):394-397.
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  5.  14
    Mossé Athens in Decline 404–86 B.C. Trans. J. Stewart. London: Routledge. 1973. Pp. Viii + 181. 4 Plates. 2 Maps. £3·50. [REVIEW]J. Roy, C. Mosse & J. Stewart - 1975 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 95:246-247.
  6.  26
    Interacting Factors Affecting Illegitimacy in Preindustrial Northern England.Susan Scott & C. J. Duncan - 1997 - Journal of Biosocial Science 29 (2):151-169.
    Illegitimacy in a historic, single community at Penrith, Cumbria (1557–1812), has been studied using aggregative analysis, family reconstitution and time series analysis. This population was living under extreme conditions of hardship. Long, medium and short wavelength cycles in the rate of illegitimacy have been identified by time series analysis; each represents a different response to social and economic pressures. In a complex interaction of events, the peaks of the cycles in wheat prices were associated with rises in adult mortality which (...)
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  7.  8
    Reproductive Strategies and Sex-Biased Investment.Susan Scott & C. J. Duncan - 1999 - Human Nature 10 (1):85-108.
    Sex-biased investment in children has been explored in a historic population in northern England, 1600 to 1800, following a family reconstitution study. An examination of the wills and other available data identified three social groups: the elite, tradesmen, and subsistence farmers. The community lived under marginal conditions with poor and fluctuating levels of nutrition; infant and child mortalities were high. Clear differences were found between the social groups, and it is suggested that the elite wetnursed their daughters whereas the elite (...)
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  8. Leibniz's Mill Arguments Against Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):250-72.
    Leibniz's mill argument in 'Monadology' 17 is a well-known but puzzling argument against materialism about the mind. I approach the mill argument by considering other places where Leibniz gave similar arguments, using the same example of the machinery of a mill and reaching the same anti-materialist conclusion. In a 1702 letter to Bayle, Leibniz gave a mill argument that moves from his definition of perception (as the expression of a multitude by a simple) to the anti-materialist conclusion. Soon afterwards, in (...)
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  9. Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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  10.  37
    Belief in God is Not Properly Basic: STEWART C. GOETZ.Stewart C. Goetz - 1983 - Religious Studies 19 (4):475-484.
    In this article I shall concern myself with the question ‘Is some type of justification required in order for belief in God to be rational?’ Many philosophers and theologians in the past would have responded affirmatively to this question. However, in our own day, there are those who maintain that natural theology in any form is not necessary. This is because of the rise of a different understanding of the nature of religious belief. Unlike what most people in the past (...)
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  11.  9
    Toby Handfield, Ed. , Dispositions and Causes . Reviewed By.Duncan C. Maclean - 2011 - Philosophy in Review 31 (3):206-208.
  12. Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
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  13.  12
    C. Stewart Gillmor . History of Geophysics. Volume 2. Pp. Vi + 191. Washington, D.C.: American Geophysical Union, 1986.Sam Silverman - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (2):229-230.
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  14.  12
    C. Stewart Gillmor. Fred Terman at Stanford: Building a Discipline, a University, and Silicon Valley. Foreword by Richard Atkinson. Xiii + 642 Pp., Table, Apps., Bibl., Index. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2004. $70. [REVIEW]Catherine Westfall - 2006 - Isis 97 (1):169-170.
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  15.  12
    C. Stewart Dreaming and Historical Consciousness in Island Greece. Cambridge MA and London: Harvard University Press, . Pp. Xviii + 259, Illus. £48. 978098353222. [REVIEW]Kostas Yannakopoulos - 2014 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 134:274-275.
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  16. Hobbes, Signification, and Insignificant Names.Stewart Duncan - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):158-178.
    The notion of signification is an important part of Hobbes's philosophy of language. It also has broader relevance, as Hobbes argues that key terms used by his opponents are insignificant. However Hobbes's talk about names' signification is puzzling, as he appears to have advocated conflicting views. This paper argues that Hobbes endorsed two different views of names' signification in two different contexts. When stating his theoretical views about signification, Hobbes claimed that names signify ideas. Elsewhere he talked as if words (...)
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  17. Leibniz on Hobbes’s Materialism.Stewart Duncan - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (1):11-18.
    I consider Leibniz's thoughts about Hobbes's materialism, focusing on his less-discussed later thoughts about the topic. Leibniz understood Hobbes to have argued for his materialism from his imagistic theory of ideas. Leibniz offered several criticisms of this argument and the resulting materialism itself. Several of these criticisms occur in texts in which Leibniz was engaging with the generation of British philosophers after Hobbes. Of particular interest is Leibniz's correspondence with Damaris Masham. Leibniz may have been trying to communicate with Locke, (...)
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  18. Knowledge of God in Leviathan.Stewart Duncan - 2005 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (1):31-48.
    Hobbes denies in Leviathan that we have an idea of God. He does think, though, that God exists, and does not even deny that we can think about God, even though he says we have no idea of God. There is, Hobbes thinks, another cognitive mechanism by means of which we can think about God. That mechanism allows us only to think a few things about God though. This constrains what Hobbes can say about our knowledge of God, and grounds (...)
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  19. Hobbes's Materialism in the Early 1640s.Stewart Duncan - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (3):437 – 448.
    I argue that Hobbes isn't really a materialist in the early 1640s (in, e.g., the Third Objections to Descartes's Meditations). That is, he doesn't assert that bodies are the only substances. However, he does think that bodies are the only substances we can think about using imagistic ideas.
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  20. Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses.Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo (eds.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    Debates in Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings and Contemporary Responses provides an in-depth, engaging introduction to important issues in modern philosophy. It presents 13 key interpretive debates to students, and ranges in coverage from Descartes' Meditations to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. -/- Debates include: -/- Did Descartes have a developed and consistent view about how the mind interacts with the body? Was Leibniz an idealist, or did he believe in corporeal substances? What is Locke's theory of personal identity? Could there (...)
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  21.  11
    Origins of Magnetospheric Physics. James A. Van Allen.C. Stewart Gillmor - 1984 - Isis 75 (4):769-769.
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  22.  10
    The Earth's Plasmasphere. J. F. Lemaire, K. I. Gringauz, D. L. Carpenter, V. Bossolo.C. Stewart Gillmor - 2000 - Isis 91 (1):199-200.
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  23. Hobbes on Language: Propositions, Truth, and Absurdity.Stewart Duncan - 2016 - In A. P. Martinich & Kinch Hoekstra (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hobbes. Oxford University Press. pp. 57-72.
    Language was central to Hobbes's understanding of human beings and their mental abilities, and criticism of other philosophers' uses of language became a favorite critical tool for him. This paper connects Hobbes's theories about language to his criticisms of others' language, examining Hobbes's theories of propositions and truth, and how they relate to his claims that various sorts of proposition are absurd. It considers whether Hobbes in fact means anything more by 'absurd' than 'false'. And it pays particular attention to (...)
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  24. Materialism and the Activity of Matter in Seventeenth‐Century European Philosophy.Stewart Duncan - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (11):671-680.
    Early modern debates about the nature of matter interacted with debates about whether matter could think. In particular, some philosophers (e.g., Cudworth and Leibniz) objected to materialism about the human mind on the grounds that matter is passive, thinking things are active, and one cannot make an active thing out of passive material. This paper begins by looking at two seventeenth-century materialist views (Hobbes’s, and one suggested but not endorsed by Locke) before considering that objection (which I call here the (...)
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  25. Leibniz on the Expression of God.Stewart Duncan - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2:83-103.
    Leibniz frequently uses the notion of expression, but it is not easy to see just how he understood that relation. This paper focuses on the particular case of the expression of God, which is prominent in the 'Discourse on Metaphysics'. The treatment of expression there suggests several questions. Which substances did Leibniz believe expressed God? Why did Leibniz believe those substances expressed God? And did he believe that all substances expressed God in the same way and for the same reasons? (...)
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  26.  14
    Reporting Suspected Abuse or Neglect in Research Involving Children.David B. Resnik & Duncan C. Randall - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (8):555-559.
    In this article, we explore the ethical issues related to the reporting of suspected abuse or neglect in research involving children. Ethical dilemmas related to reporting child maltreatment are often complex because the rights of children and their adult caregivers may conflict and determinations of abuse or neglect are socially constructed judgments that depend on particular circumstances. We argue that when reporting is legally mandated, investigators must follow the law and report their suspicions to Child Protective Services. When reporting is (...)
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  27.  12
    Nutrition, Fertility and Steady-State Population Dynamics in a Pre-Industrial Community in Penrith, Northern England.Susan Scott & C. J. Duncan - 1999 - Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (4):505-523.
    The effect of nutrition on fertility and its contribution thereby to population dynamics are assessed in three social groups (elite, tradesmen and subsistence) in a marginal, pre-industrial population in northern England. This community was particularly susceptible to fluctuations in the price of grains, which formed their basic foodstuff. The subsistence class, who formed the largest part of the population, had low levels of fertility and small family sizes, but women from all social groups had a characteristic and marked subfecundity in (...)
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  28.  65
    Thomas Hobbes.Stewart Duncan - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), whose current reputation rests largely on his political philosophy, was a thinker with wide ranging interests. In philosophy, he defended a range of materialist, nominalist, and empiricist views against Cartesian and Aristotelian alternatives. In physics, his work was influential on Leibniz, and lead him into disputes with Boyle and the experimentalists of the early Royal Society. In history, he translated Thucydides's History of the Peloponnesian War into English, and later wrote his own history of the Long Parliament. (...)
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  29.  14
    A New Case for the Liberal Arts.D. G. Winter, D. C. Mcclelland & A. J. Stewart - 1983 - British Journal of Educational Studies 31 (2):167-168.
  30.  21
    Developmental Trajectories of Sleep Problems From Childhood to Adolescence Both Predict and Are Predicted by Emotional and Behavioral Problems.Biyao Wang, Corinna Isensee, Andreas Becker, Janice Wong, Peter R. Eastwood, Rae-Chi Huang, Kevin C. Runions, Richard M. Stewart, Thomas Meyer, L. G. Brüni, Florian D. Zepf & Aribert Rothenberger - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  31.  71
    A Commentary on Kant’s Critique of Practical Reason.A. R. C. Duncan - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (4):560-562.
    When this work was first published in 1960, it immediately filled a void in Kantian scholarship. It was the first study entirely devoted to Kant's _Critique of Practical Reason_ and by far the most substantial commentary on it ever written. This landmark in Western philosophical literature remains an indispensable aid to a complete understanding of Kant's philosophy for students and scholars alike. This _Critique_ is the only writing in which Kant weaves his thoughts on practical reason into a unified argument. (...)
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  32.  23
    Stress, LTP, and Depressive Disorder.I. C. Reid & C. A. Stewart - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):626-627.
    Preoccupation with LTP as a putative memory mechanism may have retarded the consideration of pathological modulation of synaptic plasticity in clinical disorders where memory dysfunction is not a primary feature. Encouraged by Shors & Matzel's review, we consider the relationship between stress, synaptic plasticity, and depressive disorder.
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  33. Hobbes: Metaphysics and Method.Stewart D. R. Duncan - 2003 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    This dissertation discusses the work of Thomas Hobbes, and has two main themes. The first is Hobbes's materialism, and the second is Hobbes's relationships to other philosophers, in particular his place in the mechanist movement that is said to have replaced Aristotelianism as the dominant philosophy in the seventeenth century. -/- I argue that Hobbes does not, for most of his career, believe the general materialist view that bodies are the only substances. He believes, rather, that ideas, which are our (...)
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  34. Reading Feminist Theories Collaborating Across Disciplines.Anne C. Herrmann & Abigail J. Stewart - 2001 - In Abigail J. Stewart (ed.), Theorizing Feminism: Parallel Trends in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Westview Press.
  35. Practical Matter Newton's Science in the Service of Industry and Empire, 1687-1851.Margaret C. Jacob & Larry Stewart - 2004
     
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  36.  20
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Alex C. Michalos & C. Stewart - 1982 - Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):251-253.
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  37.  25
    Reviews. [REVIEW]Deborah C. Poff & D. Stewart - 1982 - Journal of Business Ethics 1 (1):73-77.
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  38.  1
    The Interacting Effects of Prices and Weather on Population Cycles in a Preindustrial Community.Susan Scott, S. R. Duncan & C. J. Duncan - 1998 - Journal of Biosocial Science 30 (1):15-32.
    The exogenous cycles and population dynamics of the community at Penrith, Cumbria, England, have been studied (1557-1812) using aggregative analysis, family reconstitution and time series analysis. This community was living under marginal conditions for the first 200 years and the evidence presented is of a homeostatic regime where famine, malnutrition and epidemic disease acted to regulate the balance between resources and population size. This provides an ideal historic population for an investigation of the direct and indirect effects of malnutrition. Throughout (...)
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  39. [Professional Integration in a West African Urban Environment].S. Traore, E. Voland, R. I. Dunbar, C. Z. Guilmoto, K. B. Newbold, G. M. Nunez-Rocha, M. Bullen-Navarro, B. C. Castillo-Trevino, E. Solis-Perez & C. R. Duncan - 1997 - Journal of Biosocial Science 29 (3):251-65.
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  40.  89
    A Noncausal Theory of Agency.Stewart C. Goetz - 1988 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (2):303-316.
    My dissertation consists of two main parts. In the first part, I begin by assuming the plausibility of the libertarian thesis that agents sometimes could have done otherwise than they did given the very same history of the world. In light of this assumption, I undertake to develop a model of agency which does not employ the concept of agent-causation. My agency theory is developed in three main stages: I suggest that any agency theory must satisfy four desiderata: It must (...)
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  41.  59
    Cudworth as a Critic of Hobbes.Stewart Duncan - forthcoming - In Marcus P. Adams (ed.), A Companion to Hobbes. Blackwell.
    This chapter considers Ralph Cudworth as a philosophical critic of Hobbes. Cudworth saw Hobbes as a representative of the three views he was attacking: atheism, determinism, and the denial that morality is eternal and immutable. Moreover, he did not just criticize Hobbes by assuming that a general critique of those views applied to Hobbes’s particular case. Rather, he singled out Hobbes, often by quoting him, and argued against the distinctively Hobbesian positions he had identified. In this chapter I look at (...)
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  42.  16
    Duncan Forbes, "Hume's Philosophical Politics". [REVIEW]John B. Stewart - 1977 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):231.
  43. Health Research Participants' Preferences for Receiving Research Results.C. R. Long, M. K. Stewart, T. V. Cunningham, T. S. Warmack & P. A. McElfish - 2016 - Clinical Trials 13:1-10.
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  44. Comments on Larry May, Limiting Leviathan. [REVIEW]Stewart Duncan - 2014 - Hobbes Studies 27 (2):185-190.
    This paper discusses two aspects of Larry May's book Limiting Leviathan. First it discusses a passage in Leviathan, to which May draws attention, in which Hobbes connects obligation to "that, which in the disputations of scholars is called absurdity". Secondly it looks at the book's discussion of Hobbes and pacifist attitudes, with reference to Hobbes's contemporary critic John Eachard.
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  45. Early Modern Accounts of Epicureanism.Stewart Duncan & Antonia LoLordo - forthcoming - In Jacob Klein & Nathan Powers (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    We look at some interesting and important episodes in the life of early modern Epicureanism, focusing on natural philosophy. We begin with two early moderns who had a great deal to say about ancient Epicureanism: Pierre Gassendi and Ralph Cudworth. Looking at how Gassendi and Cudworth conceived of Epicureanism gives us a sense of what the early moderns considered important in the ancient tradition. It also points us towards three main themes of early modern Epicureanism in natural philosophy, which we (...)
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  46.  3
    End Trimming Plots Without Influencing Yields.Stewart Duncan & Ne Area Ext - 2006 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1485 (737):567.
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  47. Hume and a Worry About Simplicity.Stewart Duncan - 2009 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 26 (2):139-157.
    I discuss Hume's views about whether simplicity and generality are positive features of explanations. In criticizing Hobbes and others who base their systems of morality on self interest, Hume diagnoses their errors as resulting from a "love of simplicity". These worries about whether simplicity is a positive feature of explanations emerge in Hume's thinking over time. But Hume does not completely reject the idea that it's good to seek simple explanations. What Hume thinks we need is good judgment about when (...)
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  48. Hobbes on the Signification of Evaluative Language.Stewart Duncan - 2019 - Hobbes Studies 32 (2):159-178.
    Hobbes repeatedly expressed concerns about moral and political language, e.g., about the bad consequences of various uses and misuses of language. He did not simply focus on the consequences though. He also attempted to understand the problems, using the central semantic notion in his philosophy of language, signification. Hobbes, in both the Elements of Law and Leviathan, argues that a wide variety of terms – including ‘good’, ‘bad’, and the names of virtues and vices – have a double and inconstant (...)
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  49. Hobbes, Universal Names, and Nominalism.Stewart Duncan - 2017 - In Stefano Di Bella & Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.), The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes was, rather famously, a nominalist. The core of that nominalism is the belief that the only universal things are universal names: there are no universal objects, or universal ideas. This paper looks at what Hobbes's views about universal names were, how they evolved over time, and how Hobbes argued for them. The remainder of the paper considers two objections to Hobbes's view: a criticism made by several of Hobbes's contemporaries, that Hobbes's view could not account for people saying (...)
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  50. Locke, God, and Materialism.Stewart Duncan - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 10.
    This paper investigates Locke’s views about materialism, by looking at the discussion in Essay IV.x. There Locke---after giving a cosmological argument for the existence of God---argues that God could not be material, and that matter alone could never produce thought. In discussing the chapter, I pay particular attention to some comparisons between Locke’s position and those of two other seventeenth-century philosophers, René Descartes and Ralph Cudworth. -/- Making use of those comparisons, I argue for two main claims. The first is (...)
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