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  1. Holly Andersen (2014). The Development of the ‘Specious Present’ and James’ Views on Temporal Experience. In Dan Lloyd Valtteri Arstila (ed.), Subjective Time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality. MIT Press. 25-42.
    This chapter examines the philosophical discussion concerning the relationship between time, memory, attention, and consciousness, from Locke through the Scottish Common Sense tradition, in terms of its influence on James' development of the specious present doctrine. The specious present doctrine is the view that the present moment in experience is non punctate, but instead comprises some nonzero amount of time; it contrasts with the mathematical view of the present, in which the divide between past and future is merely a point (...)
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  2. Wayne K. Andrew (1982). The Givenness of Self and Others in Husserl's Transcendental Phenomenology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 13 (1):85-100.
    Husserl's explication of "self" and "others" occurs within his founding science of pure possibilities or "bracketed" consciousness and experience. His analysis of self and others seeks, in part, to demonstrate that "personal" or "self-experience" is not the only possibility of immanent consciousness but that "other persons" are also given as possibilities. The possibility of others, though in a form of givenness different from that of self, provides a basis for inter-subjectivity. Thus, Husserl's phenomenological analysis can, if it does avoid solipsism (...)
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  3. Yvon Blanchard (1965). Phänomenologische Psychologie. Husserl Von Edmund. Herausgegeben von Walter Biemel. Den Haag, Martinus Nijhoff 1962. S. XXVIII-651. [REVIEW] Dialogue 3 (04):451-452.
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  4. H. Carel (2012). Phenomenology as a Resource for Patients. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):96-113.
    Patient support tools have drawn on a variety of disciplines, including psychotherapy, social psychology, and social care. One discipline that has not so far been used to support patients is philosophy. This paper proposes that a particular philosophical approach, phenomenology, could prove useful for patients, giving them tools to reflect on and expand their understanding of their illness. I present a framework for a resource that could help patients to philosophically examine their illness, its impact on their life, and its (...)
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  5. Steven Galt Crowell (2002). Does the Husserl/Heidegger Feud Rest on a Mistake ? An Essay on Psychological and Transcendental Phenomenology. Husserl Studies 18 (2):123-140.
  6. Larry Davidson (1988). Husserl's Refutation of Psychologism and the Possibility of a Phenomenological Psychology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 19 (1):1-17.
  7. Theodorus de Boer (1978). The Development of Husserl's Thought. Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION In the first part of this study I will deal with the publications of Husserl's first period, ie Ueber den Begriff der Zahl (his "Habilita- ...
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  8. Natalie Depraz (2004). Where is the Phenomenology of Attention That Husserl Intended to Perform? A Transcendental Pragmatic-Oriented Description of Attention. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (1):5-20.
    For the most part, attention occurs as a theme adjacent to much more topical and innovatingly operating acts: first, the intentional act, which represents a destitution of the abstract opposition between subject and object and which paves the way for a detailed analysis of our perceptive horizontal subjective life; second, the reductive act, specified in a psycho-phenomenological sense as a reflective conversion of the way I am looking at things; third, the genetic method understood as a genealogy of logic based (...)
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  9. John J. Drummond (2008). The Transcendental and the Psychological. Husserl Studies 24 (3):193-204.
    This paper explores the emergence of the distinctions between the transcendental and the psychological and, correlatively, between phenomenology and psychology that emerge in The Idea of Phenomenology. It is argued that this first attempt to draw these distinctions reveals that the conception of transcendental phenomenology remains infected by elements of the earlier conception of descriptive psychology and that only later does Husserl move to a more adequate—but perhaps not yet fully purified—conception of the transcendental.
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  10. Daniel J. Dwyer (2007). Husserl's Appropriation of the Psychological Concepts of Apperception and Attention. Husserl Studies 23 (2):83-118.
    In the sixth Logical Investigation, Husserl thematizes the surplus (Überschuß) of the perceptual intention whereby the intending goes beyond the partial givenness of a perceptual object to the object as a whole. This surplus is an apperceptive surplus that transcends the purely perceptual substance (Gehalt) or sensed content (empfundene Inhalt) available to a perceiver at any one time. This surplus can be described on the one hand as a synthetic link to future, possible, active experience; to intend an object is (...)
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  11. Lester Embree (2003). Aron Gurwitsch's Theory of Cultural-Scientific Phenomenological Psychology. Husserl Studies 19 (1):43-70.
    After addressing the question of whether Aron Gurwitsch (1901–1973) even had a theory of psychology, which is not obvious unless one collates the many dispersed remarks, a well-documented exposition of that theory is offered that clarifies the data, categories, field, methods, and topics of the versions of psychology he advocated.
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  12. Marvin Farber (1940). Edmund Husserl and the Background of His Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1 (1):1-20.
  13. Jacob Golomb (1976). Psychology From the Phenomenological Standpoint of Husserl. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 36 (4):451-471.
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  14. Wolfe Mays (1977). Genetic-Analysis and Experience-Husserl and Piaget. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 8 (1):51-56.
  15. Ian Rory Owen (2007). Understanding the Ubiquity of the Intentionality of Consciousness in Commonsense and Psychotherapy. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (1):1-12.
    A formal and idealised understanding of intentionality as a mental process is a central topic within the classical Husserlian phenomenological analysis of consciousness. This paper does not define Husserl’s stance, because that has been achieved elsewhere (Kern, 1977, 1986, 1988; Kern & Marbach, 2001; Marbach, 1988, 1993, 2005; Owen, 2006; Zahavi, 2003). This paper shows how intentionality informs therapy theory and practice. Husserl’s ideas are taken to the psychotherapy relationship in order to explain what it means for consciousness to have (...)
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  16. Stuart F. Spicker (1971). Hodgson, S Reduction as an Anticipation of Husserls Phenomenological Psychology. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 2 (2):57-73.
  17. Kathleen L. Uhler (1987). A Clarification of Edmund Husserl's Distinction Between Phenomenological Psychology and Transcendental Phenomenology. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 18 (1):1-17.
  18. Peter Andras Varga (2010). Psychologism as Positive Heritage of Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:135-161.
    Husserl is famous for his critique of foundational psychologism. However, his relationship to psychologism is not entirely negative. His conception of philosophy is indebted also to nineteenth-century ideas of a psychological foundation of logic and philosophy. This is manifest both in historical influences on Husserl and in debates between Husserl and his contemporaries. These areas are to be investigated, with a particular focus on the Logical Investigations and the works from the period of Husserl’s transition to the transcendental phenomenology. It (...)
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  19. Nicolas Warren (2005). Von der Psychologie Zur Phänomenologie: Husserls Weg in Die Phänomenologie der “Logischen Untersuchungen”. Husserl Studies 21 (2):165-176.