Results for 'Recency Judgements'

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  1.  6
    Retrospective and Prospective Timing: Memory, Attention, and Consciousness.Serial Position & Recency Judgements - 2001 - In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa Mccormack (eds.), Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--59.
  2. Do Normative Judgements Aim to Represent the World?Bart Streumer - 2013 - Ratio 26 (4):450-470.
    Many philosophers think that normative judgements do not aim to represent the world. In this paper, I argue that this view is incompatible with the thought that when two people make conflicting normative judgements, at most one of these judgements is correct. I argue that this shows that normative judgements do aim to represent the world.
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  3. Are Moral Judgements Adaptations? Three Reasons Why It Is so Difficult to Tell.Thomas Pölzler - 2017 - South African Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):425-439.
    An increasing number of scholars argue that moral judgements are adaptations, i.e., that they have been shaped by natural selection. Is this hypothesis true? In this paper I shall not attempt to answer this important question. Rather, I pursue the more modest aim of pointing out three difficulties that anybody who sets out to determine the adaptedness of moral judgments should be aware of (though some so far have not been aware of). First, the hypothesis that moral judgements (...)
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  4.  44
    Arithmetic Judgements, First-Person Judgements and Immunity to Error Through Misidentification.Michele Palmira - 2018 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (1):155-172.
    The paper explores the idea that some singular judgements about the natural numbers are immune to error through misidentification by pursuing a comparison between arithmetic judgements and first-person judgements. By doing so, the first part of the paper offers a conciliatory resolution of the Coliva-Pryor dispute about so-called “de re” and “which-object” misidentification. The second part of the paper draws some lessons about what it takes to explain immunity to error through misidentification. The lessons are: First, the (...)
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  5. Functional Beauty, Perception, and Aesthetic Judgements.Andrea Sauchelli - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):41-53.
    The concept of functional beauty is analysed in terms of the role played by beliefs, in particular expectations, in our perceptions. After finding various theories of functional beauty unsatisfying, I introduce a novel approach which explains how aesthetic judgements on a variety of different kinds of functional objects (chairs, buildings, cars, etc.) can be grounded in perceptions influenced by beliefs.
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  6.  38
    The Fitting-Attitude Analysis of Value Relations and the Preferences Vs. Value Judgements Objection.Mauro Rossi - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (2):287-311.
    According to Wlodek Rabinowicz's (2008) fitting-attitude analysis of value relations, two items are on a par if and only if it is both permissible to strictly prefer one to the other and permissible to have the opposite strict preference. Rabinowicz’s account is subject, however, to one important objection: if strict preferences involve betterness judgements, then his analysis contrasts with the intuitive understanding of parity. In this paper, I examine Rabinowicz’s three responses to this objection and argue that they do (...)
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  7.  17
    Processing of Recency Items for Free Recall.Michael J. Watkins & Olga C. Watkins - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (3):488.
    Argues that although the phenomenon of negative recency in secondary memory is usually attributed to the reduced amount of rehearsal associated with recency items, this phenomenon can be explained by the adoption of a different type of processing for recency items. An experiment with 122 undergraduates is reported in which the recall of recency items was reduced in an immediate test, but increased in a subsequent test, under conditions in which the recency items could not (...)
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  8.  15
    Ethical Issues in Research on Substance‐Dependent Parents: The Risk of Implicit Normative Judgements by Researchers.Anke Snoek & Dorothee Horstkötter - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (9):620-627.
    When doing research among vulnerable populations, researchers are obliged to protect their subjects from harm. We will argue that traditional ethical guidelines are not sufficient to do this, since they mainly focus on direct harms that can occur: for example, issues around informed consent, fair recruitment and risk/harm analysis. However, research also entails indirect harms that remain largely unnoticed by research ethical committees and the research community. Indirect harms do not occur during data collection, but in the analysis of the (...)
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  9. Damage to the Prefrontal Cortex Increases Utilitarian Moral Judgements.Michael Koenigs, Liane Young, Ralph Adolphs, Daniel Tranel, Fiery Cushman, Marc Hauser & Antonio Damasio - 2007 - Nature 446 (7138):908-911.
    The psychological and neurobiological processes underlying moral judgement have been the focus of many recent empirical studies1–11. Of central interest is whether emotions play a causal role in moral judgement, and, in parallel, how emotion-related areas of the brain contribute to moral judgement. Here we show that six patients with focal bilateral damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPC), a brain region necessary for the normal generation of emotions and, in particular, social emotions12–14, produce an abnor- mally ‘utilitarian’ pattern of (...)
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  10.  43
    On Value-Judgements and Ethics in Health Technology Assessment.Bjørn Hofmann - 2005 - Poiesis and Praxis 3 (4):277-295.
    The widespread application of technology in health care has imposed a broad range of challenges. The field of health technology assessment (HTA) is developed in order to face some of these challenges. However, this strategy has not been as successful as one could hope. One of the reasons for this is that social and ethical considerations have not been integrated in the HTA process. Nowadays however, such considerations have been included in many HTAs. Still, the conclusions and recommendations of the (...)
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  11.  77
    The Delocalized Mind. Judgements, Vehicles, and Persons.Pierre Steiner - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):1-24.
    Drawing on various resources and requirements (as expressed by Dewey, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Brandom), this paper proposes an externalist view of conceptual mental episodes that does not equate them, even partially, with vehicles of any sort, whether the vehicles be located in the environment or in the head. The social and pragmatic nature of the use of concepts and conceptual content makes it unnecessary and indeed impossible to locate the entities that realize conceptual mental episodes in non-personal or subpersonal contentful (...)
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  12.  15
    Recency and Frequency in Paired-Associate Learning.Lloyd R. Peterson, Dorothy Saltzman, Kenneth Hillner & Vera Land - 1962 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (4):396.
  13.  24
    Probability Learning and a Negative Recency Effect in the Serial Anticipation of Alternative Symbols.Murray E. Jarvik - 1951 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (4):291.
  14.  59
    Primacy and Recency Effects in Serial-Position Curves of Immediate Recall.John C. Jahnke - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (1):130.
  15.  14
    How Frequency Affects Recency Judgments: A Model for Recency Discrimination.Arthur J. Flexser & Gordon H. Bower - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):706.
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  16.  13
    The Isolation, Primacy, and Recency Effects Predicted by an Adaptive LTD/LTP Threshold in Postsynaptic Cells.Sverker Sikström - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (2):243-275.
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  17.  26
    Judgment of Recency for Pictures and Words.Gary L. Lassen, Terry C. Daniel & Neil R. Bartlett - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (5):795.
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  18.  17
    Primacy, Recency, Frequency, and Vividness.A. Jersild - 1929 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (1):58.
  19.  7
    Negative Recency in Initial Free Recall.John M. Gardiner, Charles P. Thompson & Ann S. Maskarinec - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (1):71.
  20.  5
    Frequency, Recency, and Repetition Effects on Same and Different Response Times.Raymond S. Nickerson - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (2):330.
  21.  16
    Positive Recency in Final Free Recall.Gregory F. Mazuryk - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):812.
  22.  17
    Recognition Time: Effects of Recency, Frequency and the Spacing of Repetitions.Douglas L. Hintzman - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p1):192.
  23.  4
    Apparent Recency of Unrelated Pictures and Nouns Presented in the Same Sequence.James L. Fozard - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):137.
  24.  12
    Judgment of Recency Under Steady-State Conditions.James V. Hinrichs & Herman Buschke - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (4p1):574.
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  25.  10
    Serial Position Effects for Repeated Free Recall: Negative Recency or Positive Primacy?Wayne H. Bartz, Marion Q. Lewis & Gene Swinton - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):10.
  26.  9
    Functions Relating Children's Observing Behavior to Amount and Recency of Stimulus Familiarization.Joan H. Cantor & Gordon N. Cantor - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):859.
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  27.  8
    Absolute Judgments of Recency for Pictures and Nouns After Various Numbers of Intervening Items.James L. Fozard & Jane R. Weinert - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):472.
  28.  7
    Meaning Versus Repetition, Recency, and Effect in the Determination of Choices of Alternative Letters of a Mental Maze.C. L. Morgan - 1934 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (6):839.
  29.  6
    Primacy and Recency as Factors in Cul-de-Sac Elimination in a Stylus Maze.C. J. Warden - 1924 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (2):98.
  30.  5
    Role of Recency in the Novelty Transfer Effect.David A. Taylor & Arnold Binder - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p1):335.
  31.  4
    Effect of Presentation Time on the Judged Recency of Pictures.William G. Frey & James L. Fozard - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):105.
  32.  5
    The Role of Recency in Learning.R. H. Waters & John G. Reitz - 1950 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (2):254.
  33.  3
    Postremity, Recency, and Frequency as Bases for Prediction in the Maze Situation.Virginia W. Voeks - 1948 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):495.
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  34.  2
    Learning When Frequency and Recency Factors Are Negative.J. Peterson - 1922 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (4):270.
  35. Rationalism and the Content of Intuitive Judgements.Anna-Sara Malmgren - 2011 - Mind 120 (478):263-327.
    It is commonly held that our intuitive judgements about imaginary problem cases are justified a priori, if and when they are justified at all. In this paper I defend this view — ‘rationalism’ — against a recent objection by Timothy Williamson. I argue that his objection fails on multiple grounds, but the reasons why it fails are instructive. Williamson argues from a claim about the semantics of intuitive judgements, to a claim about their psychological underpinnings, to the denial (...)
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  36.  57
    Accommodating Our Pattern of Judgements About Metaphysical Explanations: Evidence That Metaphysical Explanation is Not Asymmetric.Andrew James Latham & Kristie Miller - manuscript
    It is near orthodoxy to suppose that metaphysical explanations are asymmetric: if x metaphysically explains y, then y does not metaphysically explain x. That is because philosophers have typically thought that an account of metaphysical explanation ought be sensitive to our practices in offering and evaluating metaphysical explanations, and to our intuitions about the conditions under which such explanations obtain, or fail to. Philosophers have supposed that as a matter of fact if we judge that x metaphysically explains y, then (...)
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  37.  82
    Judgements of Metaphysical Explanations Are Context Sensitive.Andrew James Latham & Kristie Miller - manuscript
    Empirical investigation of the conditions under which people prefer, or disprefer, causal explanation, has suggested to many that our judgements about what causally explains what are context sensitive in a number of ways. This has led many to suppose that whether or not a causal explanation obtains depends on various contextual factors, and that said explanations can obtain in one context, and not in another: they are both subjective and agent-relative. Surprisingly, most accounts of metaphysical explanation suppose there to (...)
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  38.  37
    The Role of Analytic Thinking in Moral Judgements and Values.Gordon Pennycook, James Allan Cheyne, Nathaniel Barr, Derek J. Koehler & Jonathan A. Fugelsang - 2014 - Thinking and Reasoning 20 (2):188-214.
    While individual differences in the willingness and ability to engage analytic processing have long informed research in reasoning and decision making, the implications of such differences have not yet had a strong influence in other domains of psychological research. We claim that analytic thinking is not limited to problems that have a normative basis and, as an extension of this, predict that individual differences in analytic thinking will be influential in determining beliefs and values. Along with assessments of cognitive ability (...)
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  39.  23
    Observer Judgements About Moral Agents' Ethical Decisions: The Role of Scope of Justice and Moral Intensity.M. S. Singer & A. E. Singer - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (5):473 - 484.
    The study ascertained (1) whether an observer's scope of justice with reference to either the moral agent or the target person of a moral act, would affect his/her judgements of the ethicality of the act, and (2) whether observer judgements of ethicality parallel the moral agent's decision processes in systematically evaluating the intensity of the moral issue. A scenario approach was used. Results affirmed both research questions. Discussions covered the implications of the findings for the underlying cognitive processes (...)
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  40. Metaethics, Teleosemantics and the Function of Moral Judgements.Neil Sinclair - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):639-662.
    This paper applies the theory of teleosemantics to the issue of moral content. Two versions of teleosemantics are distinguished: input-based and output-based. It is argued that applying either to the case of moral judgements generates the conclusion that such judgements have both descriptive (belief-like) and directive (desire-like) content, intimately entwined. This conclusion directly validates neither descriptivism nor expressivism, but the application of teleosemantics to moral content does leave the descriptivist with explanatory challenges which the expressivist does not face. (...)
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  41.  29
    Three Ethical Frames of Reference: Insights Into Millennials' Ethical Judgements and Intentions in the Workplace.Barbara Culiberg & Katarina Katja Mihelič - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (1):94-111.
    The paper investigates the ethical decisions of Millennials, who are not only part of an expanding cohort of the workforce, but also represent potential future managers with a growing influence on work practices and employment relationships. In the conceptual model, we propose that three ethical frames of reference, represented by perceived organisational ethics, perceived employee ethics and reflective moral attentiveness, antecede ethical judgements, which further influence the ethical intentions of Millennials. Using structural equation modelling, we test the model for (...)
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  42.  35
    Consideration of Moral Intensity in Ethicality Judgements: Its Relationship with Whistle-Blowing and Need-for-Cognition. [REVIEW]Ming Singer, Sarah Mitchell & Julie Turner - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (5):73-87.
    Within the theoretical framework of the moral intensity model of ethical decision making (Jones, 1991), two studies ascertained the contention that ethicality judgements are contingent upon the perceived intensity of the moral issue. In addition, Study 1 extended the validity of the moral intensity notion to whistle-blowing behaviour; Study 2 addressed the effect of the individual difference variable, need-for-cognition, on differential utilization of intensity dimensions in the ethical decision process. A scenario approach was used in both studies. Results have (...)
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  43. Aesthetic Judgements and Motivation.Alfred Archer - 2017 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 60 (6):1-22.
    Are aesthetic judgements cognitive, belief-like states or non-cognitive, desire-like states? There have been a number of attempts in recent years to evaluate the plausibility of a non-cognitivist theory of aesthetic judgements. These attempts borrow heavily from non-cognitivism in metaethics. One argument that is used to support metaethical non-cognitivism is the argument from Motivational Judgement Internalism. It is claimed that accepting this view, together with a plausible theory of motivation, pushes us towards accepting non-cognitivism. A tempting option, then, for (...)
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  44.  26
    Do Judgements About Risk Track Modal Ordering?Adam Michael Bricker - 2018 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):200-208.
    On the standard conception of risk, the degree to which an event is risky is the function of the probability of that event. Recently, Duncan Pritchard has challenged this view, proposing instead a modal account on which risk is conceived of in terms of modal ordering (2015). On this account, the degree of risk for any given event is a function of its modal distance from the actual world, not its likelihood. Pritchard's main motivation for this is that the probabilistic (...)
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  45.  54
    Hume's Emotivist Theory of Moral Judgements.James Chamberlain - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    Hume is believed by many to hold an emotivist thesis, according to which all expressions of moral judgements are expressions of moral sentiments. However, most specialist scholars of Hume either deny that this is Hume's position or believe that he has failed to argue convincingly for it. I argue that Hume is an emotivist, and that his true arguments for emotivism have been hitherto overlooked. Readers seeking to understand Hume's theory of moral judgements have traditionally looked to the (...)
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  46.  45
    Personal Religiousness and Ethical Judgements: An Empirical Analysis. [REVIEW]James W. Clark & Lyndon E. Dawson - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (3):359 - 372.
    It has been acknowledged on numerous occasions that personal religiousness is a potential source of ethical norms, and consequently, an influence in ethical evaluations. An extensive literature review provides little in the way of empirical investigation of this recognized affect. This investigation conceptualizes religiousness as a motivation for ethical action, and discovers significant differences in ethical judgements among respondents categorized by personal religious motivation. Suggestions as to the source of these differences, and the implications which they offer to managers (...)
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  47. Unmasking the Truth Beneath the Beauty: Why the Supposed Aesthetic Judgements Made in Science May Not Be Aesthetic at All.Cain S. Todd - 2008 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):61 – 79.
    In this article I examine the status of putative aesthetic judgements in science and mathematics. I argue that if the judgements at issue are taken to be genuinely aesthetic they can be divided into two types, positing either a disjunction or connection between aesthetic and epistemic criteria in theory/proof assessment. I show that both types of claim face serious difficulties in explaining the purported role of aesthetic judgements in these areas. I claim that the best current explanation (...)
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  48. From Justified Emotions to Justified Evaluative Judgements.Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (1):55-77.
    ABSTRACT: Are there justified emotions? Can they justify evaluative judgements? We first explain the need for an account of justified emotions by emphasizing that emotions are states for which we have or lack reasons. We then observe that emotions are explained by their cognitive and motivational bases. Considering cognitive bases first, we argue that an emotion is justified if and only if the properties the subject is aware of constitute an instance of the relevant evaluative property. We then investigate (...)
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  49. Reasoning with Comparative Moral Judgements: An Argument for Moral Bayesianism.Ittay Nissan-Rozen - 2017 - In Rafal Urbaniak & Gillman Payette (eds.), Applications of Formal Philosophy. The Road Less Travelled. Cham: Springer. pp. 113-136.
    The paper discusses the notion of reasoning with comparative moral judgements (i.e judgements of the form “act a is morally superior to act b”) from the point of view of several meta-ethical positions. Using a simple formal result, it is argued that only a version of moral cognitivism that is committed to the claim that moral beliefs come in degrees can give a normatively plausible account of such reasoning. Some implications of accepting such a version of moral cognitivism (...)
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  50.  79
    Judgements of Intentionality and Moral Worth: Experimental Challenges to Hindriks.Alessandro Lanteri - 2009 - Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):713-720.
    Joshua Knobe found that people are more likely to describe an action as intentional if it has had a bad outcome than a good outcome, and to blame a bad outcome than to praise a good one. These asymmetries raised numerous questions about lay moral judgement. Frank Hindriks recently proposed that one acts intentionally if one fails to comply with a normative reason against performing the action, that moral praise requires appropriate motivation, whereas moral blame does not, and that these (...)
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