Results for 'Vats May Be'

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  1. Of Brains in Vats, Whatever Brains in Vats May Be.C. Johnsen Bredo - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 112 (3):225 - 249.
    Hilary Putnam has offered two arguments to show that we cannotbe brains in a vat, and one to show that our cognitive situationcannot be fully analogous to that of brains in a vat. The latterand one of the former are irreparably flawed by misapplicationsof, or mistaken inferences from, his semantic externalism; thethird yields only a simple logical truth. The metaphysical realismthat is Putnams ultimate target is perfectly consistent withsemantic externalism.
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  2.  8
    Of Brains in Vats, Whatever Brains in Vats May Be.Bredo C. Johnsen - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 112 (3):225-249.
    Hilary Putnam has offered two arguments to show that we cannotbe brains in a vat, and one to show that our cognitive situationcannot be fully analogous to that of brains in a vat. The latterand one of the former are irreparably flawed by misapplicationsof, or mistaken inferences from, his semantic externalism; thethird yields only a simple logical truth. The metaphysical realismthat is Putnam’s ultimate target is perfectly consistent withsemantic externalism.
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  3. Langsam's “the Theory of Appearing Defended” 69–91 Ulrich Meyer/the Metaphysics of Velocity 93–102.Temporary Intrinsics, Free Will, Making Compatibilists, Incompatibilists More Compatible & Vats May Be - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 112:291-292.
  4. Metaethical Pluralism: How Both Moral Naturalism and Moral Skepticism May Be Permissible Positions.Richard Joyce - unknown
    This paper concerns the relation between two metaethical theses: moral naturalism and moral skepticism. It is important that we distinguish both from a couple of methodological principles with which they might be confused. Let us give the label “Cartesian skepticism” to the method of subjecting to doubt everything for which it is possible to do so—usually by introducing alternative hypotheses that are consistent with all available evidence (e.g., brains in vats). Let us give the label “global naturalism” to the (...)
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  5.  12
    VAT, Taxation and Prostitution: Feminist Perspectives on Polok.Ann Mumford - 2005 - Feminist Legal Studies 13 (2):163-180.
    Debates concerning the taxation of prostitution have occurred in taxation law and in feminist literature. This article will integrate the case of Polok v. C.E.C. [2002] E.W.H.C, 156; [2002] S.T.C. 361, within the feminist legal canon. The case is discussed in the context of the argument of the European doctrine of fiscal neutrality, which dictates that, regardless of legality as amongst member states, if an activity is levied to V.A.T. in one member state, V.A.T. should be levied on it in (...)
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  6.  19
    A Pastoral Evaluation on the Issue of ‘Vat En Sit’ with Special Reference to the Black Reformed Churches of South Africa.David K. Semenya - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (1):01-05.
    This article investigates the practice of vat en sit to offer solutions to church councils of the mainly Black Reformed Churches in South Africa and also to the couples and families involved in such a relationship. Vat en sit is fast becoming a common phenomenon in South Africa. It should be noted that some of the couples in the vat-en-sit relationships may enter into it with no formal agreement. However, there are partners who may enter into this kind of relationship (...)
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  7.  8
    Magic, Semantics, and Putnam’s Vat Brains.Mark Sprevak & Christina Mcleish - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (2):227-236.
    In this paper we offer an exegesis of Hilary Putnam’s classic argument against the brain-in-a-vat hypothesis offered in his Reason, truth and history. In it, Putnam argues that we cannot be brains in a vat because the semantics of the situation make it incoherent for anyone to wonder whether they are a brain in a vat. Putnam’s argument is that in order for ‘I am a brain in a vat’ to be true, the person uttering it would have to be (...)
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  8.  34
    Calling the Skeptic’s Bluff: Brains, Vats, and Irrelevance.Peter Marton - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (2):477-488.
    Dogmatists often exploit the skeptical argument based on the brains-in-a-vat scenario as a test case for their epistemological enterprises. I argue that this ‘argument’ does not deserve our attention, so it should not be used as a test case. I first show that the possibilities of empirical knowledge and of skeptical scenarios are inconsistent. If so, the BIV-skeptic must make the case for preferring such scenarios over the possibility of empirical knowledge. The central argument of my paper is that the (...)
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  9. There May Be Strict Empirical Laws in Biology, After All.Mehmet Elgin - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):119-134.
    This paper consists of four parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 evaluates arguments for the claim that there are no strict empirical laws in biology. I argue that there are two types of arguments for this claim and they are as follows: (1) Biological properties are multiply realized and they require complex processes. For this reason, it is almost impossible to formulate strict empirical laws in biology. (2) Generalizations in biology hold contingently but laws go beyond describing contingencies, (...)
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  10.  17
    There May Be Simple Pℵ1 and Pℵ2-Points and the Rudin-Keisler Ordering May Be Downward Directed.Andreas Blass & Saharon Shelah - 1987 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 33 (3):213-243.
  11.  55
    What Verities May Be.Igor Douven & Lieven Decock - 2017 - Mind 126 (502):386-428.
    Edgington has proposed a solution to the sorites paradox in terms of ‘verities’, which she defines as degrees of closeness to clear truth. Central to her solution is the assumption that verities are formally probabilities. She is silent on what verities might derive from and on why they should be probabilities. This paper places Edgington’s solution in the framework of a spatial approach to conceptualization, arguing that verities may be conceived of as deriving from how our concepts relate to each (...)
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  12.  8
    Opioids May Be Appropriate for Chronic Pain.Paul J. Christo - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):241-248.
    Patients living with chronic pain require appropriate access to opioid therapy along with improved access to pain care and additional therapeutic options. It's both medically reasonable and ethical to consider opioid therapy as a treatment option in the management of chronic, non-cancer pain for a subset of patients with severe pain that is unresponsive to other therapies, negatively impacts function or quality of life, and will likely outweigh the potential harms. This paper will examine opioid therapy in the setting of (...)
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  13.  15
    Thinking May Be More Than Computing.Peter Kugel - 1986 - Cognition 22 (2):137-198.
  14. The God Who May Be: A Hermeneutics of Religion.Richard Kearney - 2001 - Indiana University Press.
    Engaging some of the most recent and more urgent issues in the philosophy of religion today, in this lively book Richard Kearney proposes that instead of thinking of God as "actual," God might best be thought of as the possibility of the ...
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  15. My Conscience May Be My Guide, but You May Not Need to Honor It.Hugh Lafollette - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):44-58.
    A number of health care professionals assert a right to be exempt from performing some actions currently designated as part of their standard professional responsibilities. Most advocates claim that they should be excused from these duties simply by averring that they are conscientiously opposed to performing them. They believe that they need not explain or justify their decisions to anyone; nor should they suffer any undesirable consequences of such refusal. Those who claim this right err by blurring or conflating three (...)
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  16.  27
    It May Be Harder Than We Thought, but Political Diversity Will Improve Social Psychological Science.Jarret T. Crawford, José L. Duarte, Jonathan Haidt, Lee Jussim, Charlotta Stern & Philip E. Tetlock - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
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  17.  23
    There May Be Costs to Failing to Enhance, as Well as to Enhancing.Neil Levy - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):38 - 39.
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  18.  32
    How Altruistic Organ Donation May Be (Intrinsically) Bad.Ben Saunders - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (10):681-684.
    It has traditionally been assumed that organ donation must be altruistic, though the necessity of altruistic motivations has recently been questioned. Few, however, have questioned whether altruism is always a good motive. This paper considers the possibility that excessive altruism, or self-abnegation, may be intrinsically bad. How this may be so is illustrated with reference to Tom Hurka’s account of the value of attitudes, which suggests that disproportionate love of one’s own good—either excessive or deficient—is intrinsically bad. Whether or not (...)
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  19.  8
    Braking May Be More Critical Than Acceleration.William A. MacKay - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):227-228.
  20.  39
    Logic May Be Simple. Logic, Congruence and Algebra.Jean-Yves Béziau - 1997 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 5:129-147.
    This paper is an attempt to clear some philosophical questions about the nature of logic by setting up a mathematical framework. The notion of congruence in logic is defined. A logical structure in which there is no non-trivial congruence relation, like some paraconsistent logics, is called simple. The relations between simplicity, the replacement theorem and algebraization of logic are studied (including MacLane-Curry’s theorem and a discussion about Curry’s algebras). We also examine how these concepts are related to such notions as (...)
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  21. That May Be Jupiter: A Heuristic for Thinking Two-Dimensionally.Berit Brogaard - 2007 - American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (4):315 - 328.
    According to epistemic two-dimensionalism, every expression is associated with two kinds of meaning: a primary intension (a “Fregean” component) and a secondary intension (a “Russellian” component). While the rst kind of meaning lines up with the speaker’s abilities to pick out referents of correctly employed expressions in hypothetical scenarios, the second kind of meaning is a version of what standard semanticists call “semantic content”—a kind of content which does not pivot on speaker abilities. Despite its conciliatory temperament, epistemic two-dimensionalism has (...)
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  22.  75
    Why There May Be Epistemic Duties.Scott Stapleford - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (1):63-89.
    Chase Wrenn argues that there are no epistemic duties. When it appears that we have an epistemic duty to believe, disbelieve or suspend judgement about some proposition P, we are really under a moral obligation to adopt the attitude towards P that our evidence favours. The argument appeals to theoretical parsimony: our conceptual scheme will be simpler without epistemic duties and we should therefore drop them. I argue that Wrenn’s strategy is flawed. There may well be things that we ought (...)
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  23.  9
    Γ0 May Be Minimal Subrecursively Inaccessible.Andreas Weiermann - 2001 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 47 (3):397-408.
    Let T be the standard Veblen 1908 ordinal notation system for Γ0 as defined, for example, in Schütte's 1977 textbook [13] on Proof Theory. We define a slight modification of the standard assignment of fundamental sequences for the limit ordinals in T and prove that Γ0 is subrecursively inaccessible for this assignment, i.e. the induced slow and fast growing hierarchy match up at Γ0 for the first time.The results of this paper also indicate that φε00 may be considered as a (...)
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  24. What Time Travelers May Be Able to Do.Peter B. M. Vranas - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 150 (1):115 - 121.
    Kadri Vihvelin, in "What time travelers cannot do" (Philos Stud 81: 315-330, 1996), argued that "no time traveler can kill the baby who in fact is her younger self, because (V1) "if someone would fail to do something, no matter how hard or how many times she tried, then she cannot do it", and (V2) if a time traveler tried to kill her baby self, she would always fail. Theodore Sider (Philos Stud 110: 115-138, 2002) criticized Vihvelin's argument, and Ira (...)
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  25.  63
    Obsessive–Compulsive Tendencies May Be Associated with Attenuated Access to Internal States: Evidence From a Biofeedback-Aided Muscle Tensing Task.Amit Lazarov, Reuven Dar, Nira Liberman & Yuval Oded - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1401-1409.
    The present study was motivated by the hypothesis that inputs from internal states in obsessive–compulsive individuals are attenuated, which could be one source of the pervasive doubting and checking in OCD. Participants who were high or low in OC tendencies were asked to produce specific levels of muscle tension with and without biofeedback, and their accuracy in producing the required muscle tension levels was assessed. As predicted, high OC participants performed more poorly than low OC participants on this task when (...)
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  26.  38
    Conflicting Intuitions May Be Based on Differing Abilities: Evidence From Mental Imaging Research.Bill Faw - 2009 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (4):45-68.
    Much of the current imaging literature either denies the existence of wakeful non-mental imagers, views non-imagers motivationally as 'repressors' or 'neurotic', or acknowledges them but does not fully incorporate them into their models. Neurobiologists testing for imaging loss seem to assume that visual recognition, describing objects, and free-hand drawing require the forming of conscious images. The intuition that 'the psyche never thinks without an image.... the reasoning mind thinks its ideas in the form of images' (Aristotle) has a long tradition (...)
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  27.  51
    Why Procreative Preferences May Be Moral – And Why It May Not Matter If They Aren't.Ben Saunders - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (7):499-506.
    There has been much argument over whether procreative selection is obligatory or wrong. Rebecca Bennett has recently challenged the assumption that procreative choices are properly moral choices, arguing that these views express mere preferences. This article challenges Bennett's view on two fronts. First, I argue that the Non-Identity Problem does not show that there cannot be harmless wrongs – though this would require us to abandon the intuitively attractive ‘person-affecting principle’, that may be a lesser cost than abandoning some more (...)
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  28.  27
    Consciousness and Cognition May Be Mediated by Multiple Independent Coherent Ensembles.E. Roy John, Paul Easton & Robert Isenhart - 1997 - Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):3-39.
    Short-term or working memory provides temporary storage of information in the brain after an experience and is associated with conscious awareness. Neurons sensitive to the multiple stimulus attributes comprising an experience are distributed within many brain regions. Such distributed cell assemblies, activated by an event, are the most plausible system to represent the WM of that event. Studies with a variety of imaging technologies have implicated widespread brain regions in the mediation of WM for different categories of information. Each kind (...)
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  29.  25
    How Space-Number Associations May Be Created in Preliterate Children: Six Distinct Mechanisms.Hans-Christoph Nuerk, Katarzyna Patro, Ulrike Cress, Ulrike Schild, Claudia K. Friedrich & Silke M. Göbel - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  30.  19
    Sex Differences in Variability May Be More Important Than Sex Differences in Means.Lloyd G. Humphreys - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):195-196.
  31.  46
    Semantic Mechanisms May Be Responsible for Developing Synesthesia.Aleksandra Mroczko-Wä…Sowicz & Danko Nikolić - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8:1-13.
  32.  17
    Using Sensitive Personal Data May Be Necessary for Avoiding Discrimination in Data-Driven Decision Models.Indrė Žliobaitė & Bart Custers - 2016 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 24 (2):183-201.
    Increasing numbers of decisions about everyday life are made using algorithms. By algorithms we mean predictive models captured from historical data using data mining. Such models often decide prices we pay, select ads we see and news we read online, match job descriptions and candidate CVs, decide who gets a loan, who goes through an extra airport security check, or who gets released on parole. Yet growing evidence suggests that decision making by algorithms may discriminate people, even if the computing (...)
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  33.  33
    There May Be Infinitely Many Near-Coherence Classes Under U < ∂.Heike Mildenberger - 2007 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 72 (4):1228 - 1238.
    We show that in the models of u < ∂ from [14] there are infinitely many near-coherence classes of ultrafilters, thus answering Banakh's and Blass' Question 30 of [3] negatively. By an unpublished result of Canjar, there are at least two classes in these models.
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  34.  15
    Equipoise May Be in the Eye of the Beholder.Anne Moyer & Anna H. L. Floyd - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (2):21 – 22.
  35.  8
    A Workplace Mindfulness Intervention May Be Associated With Improved Psychological Well-Being and Productivity. A Preliminary Field Study in a Company Setting.Wendy Kersemaekers, Silke Rupprecht, Marc Wittmann, Chris Tamdjidi, Pia Falke, Rogier Donders, Anne Speckens & Niko Kohls - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  36.  10
    May Bes and Might Have Beens.P. F. Strawson - 1979 - In A. Margalit (ed.), Meaning and Use. Reidel. pp. 229--238.
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  37.  81
    Impure Sets May Be Located: A Reply to Cook.Nikk Effingham - 2012 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (4):330-336.
    Cook argues that impure sets are not located. But ‘location’ is an ambiguous word and when we resolve those ambiguities it turns out that on no resolution is Cook's argument compelling.
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  38.  9
    Why Authenticity May Be an Inherent Bioethical DBS Concern.Gerben Meynen & Guy Widdershoven - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (1):37-39.
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  39.  24
    The Parasite-Stress Theory May Be a General Theory of Culture and Sociality.Corey L. Fincher & Randy Thornhill - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):99-119.
    In the target article, we presented the hypothesis that parasite-stress variation was a causal factor in the variation of in-group assortative sociality, cross-nationally and across the United States, which we indexed with variables that measured different aspects of the strength of family ties and religiosity. We presented evidence supportive of our hypothesis in the form of analyses that controlled for variation in freedom, wealth resources, and wealth inequality across nations and the states of the USA. Here, we respond to criticisms (...)
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  40.  9
    The Bottleneck May Be the Solution, Not the Problem.Arnon Lotem, Oren Kolodny, Joseph Y. Halpern, Luca Onnis & Shimon Edelman - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  41.  19
    Tool Innovation May Be a Critical Limiting Step for the Establishment of a Rich Tool-Using Culture: A Perspective From Child Development.Sarah R. Beck, Jackie Chappell, Ian A. Apperly & Nicola Cutting - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):220-221.
    Recent data show that human children (up to 8 years old) perform poorly when required to innovate tools. Our tool-rich culture may be more reliant on social learning and more limited by domain-general constraints such as ill-structured problem solving than otherwise thought.
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  42.  45
    The Risk of a Lifetime: How, When, and Why Procreation May Be Permissible.Rivka Weinberg - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Having children is probably as old as the first successful organism. It is often done thoughtlessly. This book is an argument for giving procreating some serious thought, and a theory of how, when, and why procreation may be permissible.Rivka Weinberg begins with an analysis of the kind of act procreativity is and why we might be justifiably motivated to engage in it. She then proceeds to argue that, by virtue of our ownership and control of the hazardous material that is (...)
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  43.  93
    Our World Views (May Be) Incommensurable: Now What?Carol Bayley - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (3):271-284.
    In focusing their view on Kuhn, Robert Veatch and William Stempsey ignore alternative sources of insight from other voices that could help move us beyond incommensurability. Richard Rorty and Helen Longino, for example, offer another view of science and objectivity with constructive insight for the practice of science and medicine. Keywords: positivism, relativism, scientific knowledge, incommensurability, Kuhn, Rorty, Longino CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  44.  9
    Internally Represented Forces May Be Cognitively Penetrable: Comment on Freyd, Pantzer, and Cheng.Michael Ranney - 1989 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 118 (4):399-402.
  45. Thought Experiments in Philosophy.Soren Haggqvist - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):480.
    Philosophy and science employ abstract hypothetical scenarios- thought experiments - to illustrate, defend, and dispute theoretical claims. Since thought experiments furnish no new empirical observations, the method prompts two epistemological questions: whether anything may be learnt from the merely hypothetical, and, if so, how. Various sceptical arguments against the use of thought experiments in philosophy are discussed and criticized. The thesis that thought experiments in science provide a priori knowledge through non-sensory grasping of abstract entities is discussed and rejected. The (...)
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  46. Why Neuroscience May Be Able to Explain Consciousness.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1995 - Scientific American 273 (6):84-85.
  47.  2
    Reversed Priming Effects May Be Driven by Misperception Rather Than Subliminal Processing.Anders Sand - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  48.  26
    How Environmental Ethical Theory May Be Put Into Practice.J. Baird Callicott - 1996 - Ethics and the Environment 1 (1):3-14.
    Environmentalists do not appear to walk their walk as consistently as animal liberationists and anti-abortionists. Are we therefore more hypocritical? Maybe; but there's another explanation. Unlike concern for individual animals or individual fetuses, environmental concerns are holistic —air and waterpollution, species extinction, diminished ecological health and integrity. One pro-life pregnant woman may preserve the life of one unborn baby, the one in her uterus; and one animal liberationist can save the life of one animal, the one he didn't eat. But (...)
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  49.  13
    Coordinate Transformation and Limb Movements: There May Be More Complexity Than Meets the Eye.James R. Bloedel - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):326-326.
  50.  94
    Why Some Pornography May Be Art.Mimi Vasilaki - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 228-233.
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