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  1. Andrew Altman (2009). A Liberal Theory of International Justice. Oxford University Press.
    This book advances a novel theory of international justice that combines the orthodox liberal notion that the lives of individuals are what ultimately matter morally with the putatively antiliberal idea of an irreducibly collective right of self-governance. The individual and her rights are placed at center stage insofar as political states are judged legitimate if they adequately protect the human rights of their constituents and respect the rights of all others. Yet, the book argues that legitimate states have a moral (...)
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  2. Jonny Anomaly (2010). Combating Resistance: The Case for a Global Antibiotics Treaty. Public Health Ethics 3 (1):13-22.
    The use of antibiotics by one person can profoundly affect the welfare of other people. I will argue that efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance generate a global collective action problem that only a well-designed international treaty can overcome. I begin by describing the problem of resistance and outlining some market-friendly policy tools that participants in a global treaty could use to control the problem. I then defend the claim that these policies can achieve their aim while protecting individual liberty and (...)
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  3. Marcus Arvan (2012). Reconceptualizing Human Rights. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):91-105.
    This paper defends several highly revisionary theses about human rights. Section 1 shows that the phrase ?human rights? refers to two distinct types of moral claims. Sections 2 and 3 argue that several longstanding problems in human rights theory and practice can be solved if, and only if, the concept of a ?human right? is replaced by two more exact concepts: International human rights: moral claims sufficient to warrant coercive domestic and international social protection. Domestic human rights: moral claims sufficient (...)
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  4. Marcus Arvan (2012). Reconceptualizing Human Rights. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (1):91-105.
    This paper defends several highly revisionary theses about human rights. §1 shows that the phrase “human rights” refers to two distinct types of moral claims. §§2-3 argue that several longstanding problems in human rights theory and practice can be solved if, and only if, the concept of a “human right” is replaced by two more exact concepts: (A) International human rights: moral claims sufficient to warrant coercive domestic and international social protection; and (B) Domestic human rights: moral claims sufficient to (...)
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  5. Marcus Arvan (2009). In Defense of Discretionary Association Theories of Political Legitimacy: Reply to Buchanan. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy.
    Allen Buchanan has argued that a widely defended view of the nature of the state – the view that the state is a discretionary association for the mutual advantage of its members – must be rejected because it cannot adequately account for moral requirements of humanitarian intervention. This paper argues that Buchanan’s objection is unsuccessful,and moreover, that discretionary association theories can preserve an important distinction that Buchanan’s alternative approach to political legitimacy cannot: the distinction between “internal” legitimacy (a state’s ability (...)
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  6. Marcus Arvan (2008). A Nonideal Theory of Justice. Dissertation, University of Arizona
    This dissertation defends a “non-ideal theory” of justice: a systematic theory of how to respond justly to injustice. Chapter 1 argues that contemporary political philosophy lacks a non-ideal theory of justice, and defends a variation of John Rawls’ famous original position – the Non-Ideal Original Position – as a method with which to construct such a theory. Finally, Chapter 1 uses the Non-Ideal Original Position to argue for a Fundamental Principle of Non-Ideal Theory: a principle that requires injustices to be (...)
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  7. Robin Attfield (2001). Are Promises to Repay International Debt Binding? Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):505–511.
  8. Robin Attfield & Barry Wilkins (eds.) (1992). International Justice and the Third World: Studies in the Philosophy of Development. Routledge.
    International Justice and the Third World examines the conceptual and ethical issues surrounding the idea of development. The contributors forcefully contest the view that there is no such thing as justice beween societies of unequal power, and no obligation to assist poor people in distant countries. While attentive to and explicatory of the presuppositions adhering to development models, Liberal and Marxist approaches to universal responsibilities are forwarded and these approaches' ability to manage global issues of equity are weighed.
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  9. Christian Barry (2011). Immigration and Global Justice. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric 4 (1):30-38.
  10. Christian Barry & Matt Peterson (2011). Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis? In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave.
  11. Christian Barry & Sanjay Reddy (2008). International Trade and Labor Standards:A Proposal for Linkage. Columbia University Press.
    In this book, Christian Barry and Sanjay G. Reddy propose ways in which the international trading system can support poor countries in promoting the well-being of their peoples.
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  12. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (forthcoming). The Ethics of International Trade. In Darrel Moellendorf & Heather Widdows (eds.), Handbook of Global Ethics.
  13. Christian Barry & Scott Wisor (2013). Global Poverty. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
  14. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
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  15. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). Are Trade Subsidies and Tariffs Killing the Global Poor? Social Research (4):865-896.
    In recent years it has often been claimed that policies such as subsidies paid to domestic producers by affluent countries and tariffs on goods produced by foreign producers in poorer countries violate important moral requirements because they do severe harm to poor people, even kill them. Such claims involve an empirical aspect—such policies are on balance very bad for the global poor—and a philosophical aspect—that the causal influence of these policies can fairly be characterized as doing severe harm and killing. (...)
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  16. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2010). Why Remittances to Poor Countries Should Not Be Taxed. NYU Journal of International Law and Politics 42 (1):1180-1207.
  17. Endre Begby (forthcoming). A Role for Coercive Force in the Theory of Global Justice? In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Gobal Justice. Palgrave-MacMillan.
  18. Endre Begby (2010). Rawlsian Compromises in Peacebuilding? Response to Agafonow. Public Reason 2 (2):51-60.
    This paper responds to recent criticism from Alejandro Agafonow. In section I, I argue that the dilemma that Agafonow points to – while real – is in no way unique to liberal peacebuilding. Rather, it arises with respect to any foreign involvement in post-conflict reconstruction. I argue further that Agafonow’s proposal for handling this dilemma suffers from several shortcomings: first, it provides no sense of the magnitude and severity of the “oppressive practices” that peacebuilders should be willing to institutionalize. Second, (...)
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  19. Endre Begby & J. Peter Burgess (2009). Human Security and Liberal Peace. Public Reason 1 (1):91-104.
    This paper addresses a recent wave of criticisms of liberal peacebuilding operations. We decompose the critics’ argument into two steps, one which offers a diagnosis of what goes wrong when things go wrong in peacebuilding operations, and a second, which argues on the basis of the first step that there is some deep principled flaw in the very idea of liberal peacebuilding. We show that the criticism launched in the argument’s first step is valid and important, but that the second (...)
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  20. Chris Bertram, Coercion of Foreigners, Territory and Compensation.
    Justifications for state authority are typically directed towards the good of those subject to that authority. But, because of their territorial nature, states exercise coercion not only towards insiders but also towards non-members. Such coercion can take the form of denying outsiders the right to enter a territory or to settle in it permanently, as well as various restraints on trade and association. When coercion is directed at insiders, it often comes packaged with various claims about distributive justice, including claims (...)
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  21. Michael Blake (2012). Global Distributive Justice: Why Political Philosophy Need Political Science. Annual Review of Political Science 15:121-136.
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  22. Michael Blake (2012). International Law and Global Justice. In Marmor Andrei (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Law. Routledge.
  23. Michael Blake, International Justice. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  24. Michael Blake (2007). Toleration and Theocracy: How Liberal States Should Think About Religious States. Journal of International Affairs 61 (1):1-17.
  25. Michael Blake (2001). Distributive Justice, State Coercion, and Autonomy. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (3):257–296.
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
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  26. Gillian Brock (2009). Global Justice. Oxford University Press.
    OUP writes: Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The (...)
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  27. Edmund F. Byrne (2004). Terrorism and International Justice. Teaching Philosophy 27 (2):181-184.
  28. Simon Caney (2014). Two Kinds of Climate Justice: Avoiding Harm and Sharing Burdens. Journal of Political Philosophy 21 (4).
  29. Phil Clark (2008). International Justice in Rwanda and the BALKans: Virtual Trials and the Struggle for State Cooperation- by Victor Peskin. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (4):433-434.
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  30. Robert R. Clewis (2002). Against Inequalities in the World Legal Order. Philosophical Topics 30 (2):49-77.
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  31. Helena de Bres (2011). Climate Change Justice – By Eric A. Posner & David Weisbach. [REVIEW] Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (3):323-326.
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  32. James Dwyer (2007). What's Wrong with the Global Migration of Health Care Professionals? Individual Rights and International Justice. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):36-43.
    : When health care workers migrate from poor countries to rich countries, they are exercising an important human right and helping rich countries fulfill obligations of social justice. They are also, however, creating problems of social justice in the countries they leave. Solving these problems requires balancing social needs against individual rights and studying the relationship of social justice to international justice.
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  33. Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.) (2009). Critical Theorists and International Relations. Routledge.
    Covering a broad range of approaches within critical theory including Marxism and post-Marxism, the Frankfurt School, hermeneutics, phenomenology, postcolonialism, feminism, queer theory, poststructuralism, pragmatism, scientific realism, deconstruction and psychoanalysis, this book provides students with a comprehensive and accessible introduction to 32 key critical theorists whose work has been influential in the field of international relations.
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  34. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2003). International Justice as Equal Regard and the Use of Force. Ethics and International Affairs 17 (2):63–75.
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  35. Lars O. Ericsson (1980). Two Principles of International Justice. In Lars O. Ericsson, Harald Ofstad & Giuliano Pontara (eds.), Justice, Social, and Global: Papers Presented at the Stockholm International Symposium on Justice, Held in September 1978. Akademilitteratur.
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  36. Kirsten J. Fisher (2010). Identifying Liability: Ambiguous Charges in International Criminal Law. Finnish Yearbook of International Law.
  37. Kirsten J. Fisher (2009). The Distinct Character of International Crime: Theorizing the Domain. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):44-67.
  38. Pablo Gilabert (2011). Humanist and Political Perspectives on Human Rights. Political Theory 39 (4):439-467.
    This essay explores the relation between two perspectives on the nature of human rights. According to the "political" or "practical" perspective, human rights are claims that individuals have against certain institutional structures, in particular modern states, in virtue of interests they have in contexts that include them. According to the more traditional "humanist" or "naturalistic" perspective, human rights are pre-institutional claims that individuals have against all other individuals in virtue of interests characteristic of their common humanity. This essay argues that (...)
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  39. A. Hammarskjold (1924). The Place of the Permanent Court of International Justice Within the System of the League of Nations. Ethics 34 (2):146-.
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  40. A. Hammarskjöld (1924). The Place of the Permanent Court of International Justice Within the System of the League of Nations. International Journal of Ethics 34 (2):146-156.
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  41. Kristen Hessler (2006). Democratic Government and International Justice. The Monist 89 (2):259-273.
  42. Javier Hidalgo (2013). Associative Duties and Immigration. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):697-722.
  43. Javier Hidalgo (2013). Defending the Active Recruitment of Healthworkers: A Response to Commentators. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):618-620.
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  44. Peter Higgins (2009). Immigration Justice: A Principle for Selecting Just Admissions Policies. Social Philosophy Today 25:149-162.
    This paper is addressed to those who hold that states’ immigration policies are subject to cosmopolitan principles of justice. I have a very limited goal in the paper, and that is to offer a condensed explication of a principle for determining whether states’ immigration policies are just. That principle is that just immigration policies may not avoidably harm disadvantaged social groups (whether domestic or foreign). This principle is inspired by the failure, among many extant cosmopolitan proposals for regulating immigration, to (...)
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  45. Peter Higgins (2006). Review of Gould, Carol: Globalizing Democracy and Human Rights (Cambridge University Press, 2006). [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 7 (4):117-119.
  46. Iseult Honohan (2014). Domination and Migration: An Alternative Approach to the Legitimacy of Migration Controls. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):31-48.
    Freedom as non-domination provides a distinctive criterion for assessing the justifiability of migration controls, different from both freedom of movement and autonomy. Migration controls are dominating insofar as they threaten to coerce potential migrants. Both the general right of states to control migration, and the wide range of discretionary procedures prevalent in migration controls, render outsiders vulnerable to arbitrary power. While the extent and intensity of domination varies, it is sufficient under contemporary conditions of globalization to warrant limits on states’ (...)
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  47. Joe Hoover (2013). Towards a Politics for Human Rights: Ambiguous Humanity and Democratizing Rights. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (9):0191453713498390.
    Human rights are a suspect project – this seems the only sensible starting point today. This suspicion, however, is not absolute and the desire to preserve and reform human rights persists for many of us. The most important contemporary critiques of human rights focus on the problematic consequences of the desire for universal rights. Some defenders of human rights accept elements of this critique in their reformulations, but opponents remain wary of the desire to think and act in human rights (...)
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  48. Zachary Hoskins (forthcoming). ''Punishing States and the Specter of Guilt by Association''. International Criminal Law Review.
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  49. Zanab Hussain & Anand Vaidya (2006). Book Review: Terrorism and International Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):103-105.
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  50. Christine James (2004). Huntington or Halliburton? The Real Clash of Civilizations in American Life. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (8):42-54.
    A wide variety of sources, including the Huntington literature and popular mass media, show that Huntington’s “clash of civilizations” idea actually has very little value in understanding the current global political context. The central assumption of Huntington’s view, that cultural kinship ties influence loyalties and agreements on a global scale, has little to do with the daily lives of American citizens and little to do with the decisions made by the current presidential administration. The mass media evidence from the United (...)
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