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  1. Catharine Abell & Gregory Currie (1999). Internal and External Pictures. Philosophical Psychology 12 (4):429-445.
    What do pictures and mental images have in common? The contemporary tendency to reject mental picture theories of imagery suggests that the answer is: not much. We show that pictures and visual imagery have something important in common. They both contribute to mental simulations: pictures as inputs and mental images as outputs. But we reject the idea that mental images involve mental pictures, and we use simulation theory to strengthen the anti-pictorialist's case. Along the way we try to account for (...)
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  2. R. AbRams & J. Grinspan (2007). Semantic and Subword Elements of Unconscious Priming: Commentary on Kouider and Dupoux (2007)☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):957-958.
  3. R. AbRams & J. Grinspan (2007). Unconscious Semantic Priming in the Absence of Partial Awareness☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):942-953.
    In a recent paper in Psychological Science, Kouider and Dupoux reported obtaining unconscious Stroop priming only when subjects had partial awareness of the masked distractor words . Kouider and Dupoux conjectured that semantic priming occurs only when such partial awareness is present. The present experiments tested this conjecture in an affective categorization priming task that differed from Kouider and Dupoux’s in using masked distractors that subjects had practiced earlier as visible words. Experiment 1 showed priming from practiced words when subjects (...)
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  4. Richard A. Abrams (1990). Does Visual-Field Specialization Really Have Implications for Coordinated Visual-Motor Behavior? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):542-543.
  5. Richard A. Abrams, Christopher C. Davoli, Feng Du, William H. Knapp & Daniel Paull (2008). Altered Vision Near the Hands. Cognition 107 (3):1035-1047.
  6. Richard L. Abrams (2005). Unconscious Processing of Multiple Nonadjacent Letters in Visually Masked Words. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):585-601.
    The claim that visually masked, unidentifiable words are analyzed at the level of whole word meaning has been challenged by recent findings indicating that instead, analysis occurs mainly at the subword level. The present experiments examined possible limits on subword analysis. Experiment 1 obtained semantic priming from pleasant- and unpleasant-meaning subliminal words in which no individual letter contained diagnostic information about a word’s evaluative valence; thus analysis must operate on information more complex than that contained in individual letters. Experiments 2 (...)
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  7. Thorsten Albrecht, Susan Klapötke & Uwe Mattler (2010). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking Are Enhanced by Perceptual Learning. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):656-666.
    In vision research metacontrast masking is a widely used technique to reduce the visibility of a stimulus. Typically, studies attempt to reveal general principles that apply to a large majority of participants and tend to omit possible individual differences. The neural plasticity of the visual system, however, entails the potential capability for individual differences in the way observers perform perceptual tasks. We report a case of perceptual learning in a metacontrast masking task that leads to the enhancement of two types (...)
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  8. Thorsten Albrecht & Uwe Mattler (2010). Individual Differences in Metacontrast Masking: A Call for Caution When Interpreting Group Data☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):672-673.
    In this issue of Consciousness and Cognition, Bachmann comments on our study , which revealed two groups of observers with qualitative individual differences in metacontrast masking that are enhanced by perceptual learning. We are pleased that our study receives this attention and even more about Bachmann’s extremely positive comments. In this invited reply we argue that observers seem to be similar only at the beginning of the experiment but they have no choice as to which group to join. Findings strongly (...)
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  9. U. Ansorge (2002). Influences of Visibility, Intentions, and Probability in a Peripheral Cuing Task. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):528-545.
    According to the concept of direct parameter specification, nonconsciously registered information can be processed to the extent that it matches currently active intentions of a person. This prediction was tested and confirmed in the current study. Masked visual information provided by peripheral cues led to reaction time effects only if the information specified one of the required responses . Information delivered by the same masked cues that did not match the intentions was not used. However, the same information influenced RT (...)
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  10. Bernard J. Baars (1997). Spatial Brain Coherence During the Establishment of a Conscious Event. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (1):1-2.
  11. Bernard J. Baars (1996). When Are Images Conscious? The Curious Disconnection Between Imagery and Consciousness in the Scientific Literature. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):261-264.
  12. T. Bachmann (2003). Perceptual Acceleration of Objects in Stream: Evidence From Flash-Lag Displays. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):279-297.
    An object in continuous motion is perceived ahead of the briefly flashed object, although the two images are physically aligned , the phenomenon called flash-lag effect. Flash-lag effects have been found also with other continuously changing features such as color, pattern entropy, and brightness as well as with streamed pre- and post-target input without any change of the feature values of streaming items in feature space . We interpret all instances of the flash-lag as a consequence of a more fundamental (...)
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  13. Talis Bachmann (2010). Individual Differences in Metacontrast: An Impetus for Clearly Specified New Research Objectives in Studying Masking and Perceptual Awareness?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):667-671.
    While the majority of perceptual phenomena based research on consciousness is implicitly nomothetic, some idiographic perspective can be sometimes highly valuable for it. It may turn out that after having had a closer look at individual differences in the expression of psychometric functions a need to revise some nomothetic laws considered as the general ones arises as well. A study of individual differences in metacontrast masking published in this issue superbly illustrates this. A myriad of urgent research objectives emerges out (...)
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  14. R. Beau Lotto (2002). The Empirical Basis of Color Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):609-629.
    Rationalizing the perceptual effects of spectral stimuli has been a major challenge in vision science for at least the last 200 years. Here we review evidence that this otherwise puzzling body of phenomenology is generated by an empirical strategy of perception in which the color an observer sees is entirely determined by the probability distribution of the possible sources of the stimulus. The rationale for this strategy in color vision, as in other visual perceptual domains, is the inherent ambiguity of (...)
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  15. C. BeCker & M. Elliott (2006). Flicker-Induced Color and Form: Interdependencies and Relation to Stimulation Frequency and Phase. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):175-196.
    Our understanding of human visual perception generally rests on the assumption that conscious visual states represent the interaction of spatial structures in the environment and our nervous system. This assumption is questioned by circumstances where conscious visual states can be triggered by external stimulation which is not primarily spatially defined. Here, subjective colors and forms are evoked by flickering light while the precise nature of those experiences varies over flicker frequency and phase. What’s more, the occurrence of one subjective experience (...)
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  16. John Beeckmans (2009). How Chromatic Phenomenality Largely Overflow its Cognitive Accessibility. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):917-928.
    It has been suggested that the core neural bases for visual phenomenal consciousness and for access consciousness are located in anatomically separate regions. If this is correct, and if, as Block suggests, the core neural substrate of visual phenomenality is located early in the visual cortex where detailed chromatic information is available, then it would be reasonable to infer that our intuitions of chromatically rich visual phenomenality are plausible. It is furthermore suggested that during perception cognitive access to this chromatic (...)
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  17. David Bennett (2009). Varieties of Visual Perspectives. Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):329-352.
    One often hears it said that our visual-perceptual contact with the world is “perspectival.” But this can mean quite different things. Three different senses in which our visual contact with the world is “perspectival” are distinguished. The first involves the detection or representation of behaviorally important relations, holding between a perceiving subject and the world. These include time to contact, body-scaled size, egocentric position, and direction of heading. The second perspective becomes at least explicitly manifest in taking up the “proximal (...)
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  18. John Bishop, Things and Places: How the Mind Connects with the World, by Zenon Pylyshyn. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2007. Pp. Xiv + 255. H/B £25.95, $34.00. [REVIEW]
    A new book by Zenon Pylyshyn is always a cause for celebration among philosophers of psychology. While many hard-nosed experimental cognitive scientists are attentive to philosophers’ concerns, Pylyshyn stands alone in the extraordinary efforts he takes to understand, address, and struggle with the philosophical puzzles that the mind, and perception in particular, raises. Pylyshyn’s most recent work, Things and Places: How the Mind Connects with the World, does not disappoint. It is philosophically rich. Indeed, the approach to object perception that (...)
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  19. Randolph Blake (2012). Binocular Rivalry and Stereopsis Revisited. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press.
  20. Gene A. Brewer, Justin Knight, J. Thadeus Meeks & Richard L. Marsh (2011). On the Role of Imagery in Event-Based Prospective Memory. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):901-907.
    The role of imagery in encoding event-based prospective memories has yet to be fully clarified. Herein, it is argued that imagery augments a cue-to-context association that supports event-based prospective memory performance. By this account, imagery encoding not only improves prospective memory performance but also reduces interference to intention-related information that occurs outside of context. In the current study, when lure words occurred outside of the appropriate responding context, the use of imagery encoding strategies resulted in less interference when compared with (...)
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  21. Berit Brogaard (2011). Color Experience in Blindsight? Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):767 - 786.
    Blindsight, the ability to blindly discriminate wavelength and other aspects of stimuli in a blind field, sometimes occurs in people with lesions to striate (V1) cortex. There is currently no consensus on whether qualitative color information of the sort that is normally computed by double opponent cells in striate cortex is indeed computed in blindsight but doesn?t reach awareness, perhaps owing to abnormal neuron responsiveness in striate or extra-striate cortical areas, or is not computed at all. The existence of primesight, (...)
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  22. Vicki Bruce & Patrick Green (1985). Visual Perception: Physiology, Psychology, and Ecology. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  23. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (2013). Seeing and Retinal Stability: On a Sensorimotor Argument for the Necessity of Eye Movement for Sight. Philosophical Psychology 26 (2):263 - 266.
    Sensorimotor theorists of perception have argued that eye movement is a necessary condition for seeing on the basis that subjects whose retinal images do not move undergo a form of blindness. I show that the argument does not work.
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  24. Balakrishnan Chandrasekaran, Bonny Banerjee, Unmesh Kurup & Omkar Lele (2011). Augmenting Cognitive Architectures to Support Diagrammatic Imagination. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):760-777.
    Diagrams are a form of spatial representation that supports reasoning and problem solving. Even when diagrams are external, not to mention when there are no external representations, problem solving often calls for internal representations, that is, representations in cognition, of diagrammatic elements and internal perceptions on them. General cognitive architectures—Soar and ACT-R, to name the most prominent—do not have representations and operations to support diagrammatic reasoning. In this article, we examine some requirements for such internal representations and processes in cognitive (...)
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  25. Garvin Chastain & MaryLou Cheal (1997). Facilitatory or Inhibitory Nontarget Effects in the Location-Cuing Paradigm. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):328-347.
    The effect of nontargets on the identification of targets in the location-cuing paradigm was investigated in order to determine whether observers consistently allocate their attention to a validly cued location and whether the effect of nontargets is to facilitate or to inhibit performance. In four experiments, the effects of a single matching nontarget or a single nonmatching nontarget were compared. In each experiment, it was shown that observers consistently allocate their attention to a cued location when a precue appears and (...)
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  26. MaryLou Cheal (1997). Understanding Diverse Effects of Visual Attention with the VAP-Filters Metaphor. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):348-362.
    The Variable and Permeable Filters metaphor is presented with an explanation of its advantages over other popular metaphors in accounting for attention effects in many different research paradigms. Research from laboratories of the author and others are discussed briefly and shown to result in diverse facilitatory and inhibitory attention effects on visual perception. All of these effects are consistent with the VAP-Filters metaphor.
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  27. Abdessalem Chekhchoukh & Nicolas Glade (2012). Influence of Sparkle and Saccades on Tongue Electro-Stimulation-Based Vision Substitution of 2D Vectors. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (1-2):41-53.
    Vision substitution by electro-stimulation has been studied since the 60s beginning with P. Bach-y-Rita. Camera pictures or movies encoded in gray levels are displayed using an electro-stimulation display device on the surface of a body part, such as the skin or the tongue. Medical-technical devices have been developed on this principle to compensate for sensory-motor disabilities such as blindness or loss of balance, or to guide specific actions, such as surgery. However, the electrical signals of stationary or moving slowly moving (...)
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  28. M. Chirimuuta (forthcoming). Psychophysical Methods and the Evasion of Introspection. .
    In this paper I argue that certain methodological conventions within psychophysics reflect a continued uncertainty over the reliability of subjects’ introspective judgements. Firstly, different psychophysical methods do not rely equally on the introspective capabilities of experimental subjects. I contrast “minimally introspective” tasks with “introspection-reliant” ones. It is only in the latter that introspection can be said to have a nontrivial role in the subjects’ performance. Secondly, my distinction maps onto a number of important methodological divisions in vision science. The introspection-reliant (...)
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  29. Ivans Chou & Lucia M. Vaina (1995). Two-Dimensional Symmetric Form Discrimination: Fast Learning, but Notthat Fast. Synthese 104 (1):33 - 41.
    Several authors have characterized a striking phenomenon of perceptual learning in visual discrimination tasks. This learning process is selective for the stimulus characteristics and location in the visual field. Since the human visual system exploits symmetry for object recognition we were interested in exploring how it learns to use preattentive symmetry cues for discriminating simple, meaningless, forms. In this study, similar to previous studies of perceptual learning, we asked whether the effects of practice acquired in the discrimination of pairs of (...)
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  30. Colin W. G. Clifford & Gillian Rhodes (eds.) (2005). Fitting the Mind to the World: Adaptation and After-Effects in High-Level Vision. Oup Oxford.
    Fitting the Mind to the World explores the brain's remarkable capacity to adapt to its current visual environment. Leading vision researchers explore how visual experience alters the adult brain, fitting the mind to the world, and ensuring the efficient coding of sensory signals. They demonstrate how this plasticity affects every aspect of our visual experience, from the perception of movement and colour, to the perception of subtle, social and emotional information in human faces.
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  31. Moreno I. Coco & Frank Keller (2012). Scan Patterns Predict Sentence Production in the Cross-Modal Processing of Visual Scenes. Cognitive Science 36 (7):1204-1223.
    Most everyday tasks involve multiple modalities, which raises the question of how the processing of these modalities is coordinated by the cognitive system. In this paper, we focus on the coordination of visual attention and linguistic processing during speaking. Previous research has shown that objects in a visual scene are fixated before they are mentioned, leading us to hypothesize that the scan pattern of a participant can be used to predict what he or she will say. We test this hypothesis (...)
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  32. Gregory Currie (1999). Is Factuality a Matter of Content? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):763-763.
    Dienes & Perner argue that there is a hierarchy of forms of implicit knowledge. One level of their hierarchy involves factuality, where it may be merely implicit that the state of affairs is supposed to be a real one rather than something imagined or fictional. I argue that the factual or fictional status of a thought or utterance cannot be a matter of concept, implicit or explicit.
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  33. Shai Danziger, Robert Fendrich & Robert D. Rafal (1997). Inhibitory Tagging of Locations in the Blind Field of Hemianopic Patients. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):291-307.
    This study evaluated the potential contribution of extrageniculate visual pathways to oculomotor orienting reflexes in hemianopic patients. It tested whether extrageniculate pathways mediate inhibition of return —a phenomenon characterized by slowed target detections at recently stimulated locations . Because hemianopic subjects cannot overtly respond to stimuli presented within their hemianopic field, we utilized a spatial cueing paradigm that capitalized on the fact that IOR operates in spatiotopic coordinates. Subjects moved their eyes so that a cue and a target presented at (...)
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  34. Judy S. DeLoache (2004). Scale Errors by Very Young Children: A Dissociation Between Action Planning and Control. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):32-33.
    Very young children occasionally commit scale errors, which involve a dramatic dissociation between planning and control: A child's visual representation of the size of a miniature object is not used in planning an action on it, but is used in the control of the action. Glover's planning–control model offers a very useful framework for analyzing this newly documented phenomenon.
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  35. Vincent Di Lollo, James T. Enns & Ronald A. Rensink (2000). Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 129 (4):481.
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  36. Andreas Elpidorou (2010). Alva Noë: Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons From the Biology of Consciousness. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (1):155-159.
  37. Felix Engelmann, Shravan Vasishth, Ralf Engbert & Reinhold Kliegl (2013). A Framework for Modeling the Interaction of Syntactic Processing and Eye Movement Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):452-474.
    We explore the interaction between oculomotor control and language comprehension on the sentence level using two well-tested computational accounts of parsing difficulty. Previous work (Boston, Hale, Vasishth, & Kliegl, 2011) has shown that surprisal (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008) and cue-based memory retrieval (Lewis & Vasishth, 2005) are significant and complementary predictors of reading time in an eyetracking corpus. It remains an open question how the sentence processor interacts with oculomotor control. Using a simple linking hypothesis proposed in Reichle, Warren, and (...)
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  38. Mirko Farina (2013). Jan Lauwereyns: Brain and the Gaze: On the Active Boundaries of Vision. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):1029-1038.
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  39. Gregory J. Feist (2013). The Nature and Nurture of Expertise: A Fourth Dimension. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):275-288.
    One formative idea behind the workshop on expertise in Berkeley in August of 2010 was to develop a viable “trading zone” of ideas, which is defined as a location “in which communities with a deep problem of communication manage to communicate” (Collins et al. 2010, p. 8). In the current case, the goal is to have a trading zone between philosophers, sociologists, and psychologists who communicate their ideas on expertise such that productive interdisciplinary collaboration results. In this paper, I review (...)
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  40. James M. Fielding & Dirk Marwede (2012). Images, Ontology, and Uncertain Knowledge. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (4):319-321.
    We would first of all like to thank Thor Grünbaum and Andrea Raballo for their thoughtful and lively commentary on our work. We would also like to thank Daniel Rubin for taking this opportunity to describe in detail some of the research carried out in this domain since our paper was first written. Although their commentaries may seem to fall on opposite ends of the critical scale, so to speak, taken together they provide an opportunity to take stock of the (...)
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  41. Ronald A. Finke (1996). Imagery, Creativity, and Emergent Structure. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (3):381-393.
    Recent advances in the field of creative cognition have helped to reveal the cognitive structures and processes that are involved in creative thinking and imagination. This article begins by reviewing recent studies of creative imagery that have explored the emergent properties of mental images. The geneplore model of creative cognition, which describes how preinventive structures such as creative mental images are generated and interpreted, is then discussed. In discussing this model and its implications, a distinction is made between aspects of (...)
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  42. Martin H. Fischer & Richard A. Mills (2008). A Spatial Perspective on Numerical Concepts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):651-652.
    The reliable covariation between numerosity and spatial extent is considered as a strong constraint for inferring the successor principle in numerical cognition. We suggest that children can derive a general number concept from the (experientially) infinite succession of spatial positions during object manipulation.
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  43. Brian Fisher, Tera Marie Green & Richard Arias-Hernández (2011). Visual Analytics as a Translational Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):609-625.
    Visual analytics is a new interdisciplinary field of study that calls for a more structured scientific approach to understanding the effects of interaction with complex graphical displays on human cognitive processes. Its primary goal is to support the design and evaluation of graphical information systems that better support cognitive processes in areas as diverse as scientific research and emergency management. The methodologies that make up this new field are as yet ill defined. This paper proposes a pathway for development of (...)
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  44. Gary Foster (2011). Overcoming a Euthyphro Problem in Personal Love: Imagination and Personal Identity. Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):825 - 844.
    In this paper I address a Euthyphro problem associated with personal love. Do we love someone because we have reasons for loving that person or do we have reasons for loving that person because we love her? I argue that a relational view of identity will help us move some distance towards resolving this dilemma. But the relational view itself needs to be further supplemented by examining the role that imagination plays both in personal identity and in our experience of (...)
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  45. Cynthia Freeland (2009). Echo Objects: The Cognitive Work of Images. Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):389-393.
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  46. Ellen Fridland (2013). Nivedita Gangopadhyay, Michael Madary, and Finn Spencer (Eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness: Sensorimotor Dynamics and the Two Visual Systems. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):899-906.
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  47. Jay Friedenberg (2013). Visual Attention and Consciousness. Psychology Press.
    The systematic review of key topics and the multitude of perspectives make this book an ideal primary or ancillary text for graduate courses in perception, vision, consciousness, or philosophy of mind.
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  48. Liuna Geng, Lei Zhang & Diheng Zhang (2011). Improving Spatial Abilities Through Mindfulness: Effects on the Mental Rotation Task. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):801-806.
    In this study, we demonstrate a previously unknown finding that mindful learning can improve an individual’s spatial cognition without regard to gender differences. Thirty-two volunteers participated in the experiment. Baselines for spatial ability were first measured for the reaction time on the mental rotation task. Next, the participants were randomly assigned to either a mindful or mindless learning condition. After learning, the mental rotation task showed that those in the mindful learning condition responded faster than those in the mindless learning (...)
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  49. Andreas K. A. Georgiou (2007). An Embodied Cognition View of Lmagery-Based Reasoning in Science. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):215-248.
    I consider how we might begin to redress a cognitive model for thought experimental and other imagery-based scientific reasoning from an embodied cognition viewpoint. The paper gravitates on clarifying tour issues: (i) the danger of understanding the genuine novelty of thought-experimental reasoning and other imagery-based reasoning as a product of ‘quasi-perceiving’ new phenomenology with the ‘mind’s eye’ (as asserted by quasi-pictorialist theories of imagery); (ii) the erroneous choice of units of analysis that assume equivalence of external reports of visual imagery (...)
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  50. Leonard M. Giambra (1995). A Laboratory Method for Investigating Influences on Switching Attention to Task-Unrelated Imagery and Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):1-21.
    Thought-intrusions, automatic inferences, and other unintended thought are beginning to play an important role in the study of psychiatric disease as well as normal thought processes. We examine one method for study of task-unrelated imagery and thought . TUIT likelihood was shown to be reliably measured over a wide range of vigilance tasks, to have high short-term and long-term test-retest reliability, and to be sensitive to information processing demands. Likelihood of TUITs was shown to be different as a function of (...)
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