Results for ' Betting'

543 found
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  1. Betting on conditionals.Jean Baratgin, David E. Over & Guy Politzer - 2010 - Thinking and Reasoning 16 (3):172-197.
    A study is reported testing two hypotheses about a close parallel relation between indicative conditionals, if A then B , and conditional bets, I bet you that if A then B . The first is that both the indicative conditional and the conditional bet are related to the conditional probability, P(B|A). The second is that de Finetti's three-valued truth table has psychological reality for both types of conditional— true , false , or void for indicative conditionals and win , lose (...)
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  2.  58
    Betting on Theories.Patrick Maher - 1993 - Cambridge, New York and Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to decision theory, focusing on the question of when it is rational to accept scientific theories. The author examines both Bayesian decision theory and confirmation theory, refining and elaborating the views of Ramsey and Savage. He argues that the most solid foundation for confirmation theory is to be found in decision theory, and he provides a decision-theoretic derivation of principles for how many probabilities should be revised over time. Professor Maher defines a notion of (...)
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  3. When betting odds and credences come apart: more worries for Dutch book arguments.Darren Bradley & Hannes Leitgeb - 2006 - Analysis 66 (2):119-127.
    If an agent believes that the probability of E being true is 1/2, should she accept a bet on E at even odds or better? Yes, but only given certain conditions. This paper is about what those conditions are. In particular, we think that there is a condition that has been overlooked so far in the literature. We discovered it in response to a paper by Hitchcock (2004) in which he argues for the 1/3 answer to the Sleeping Beauty problem. (...)
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  4. Knowledge, Bets, and Interests.Brian Weatherson - 2012 - In Jessica Brown & Mikkel Gerken (eds.), Knowledge Ascriptions. Oxford University Press. pp. 75--103.
  5.  31
    A Betting Market: Description and a Theoretical Explanation of Bets in Pelota Matches. [REVIEW]Loreto Llorente & Josemari Aizpurua - 2008 - Theory and Decision 64 (2-3):421-446.
    In Pelota matches, bets are made between viewers through a middleman who receives 16% of the finally paid amount. In this paper, a description of the way bets are made and an explanation of the existence of those markets are presented. Taking betting markets as a simplified analogy for financial markets we have searched for the explanation in a world where both sides of the market are not different in believes and preferences. We find that for a bet to (...)
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  6.  31
    Extreme Betting.Javier González de Prado Salas - 2019 - Ratio 32 (1):32-41.
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  7. Betting on the outcomes of measurements: A bayesian theory of quantum probability.Itamar Pitowsky - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (3):395-414.
    We develop a systematic approach to quantum probability as a theory of rational betting in quantum gambles. In these games of chance, the agent is betting in advance on the outcomes of several (finitely many) incompatible measurements. One of the measurements is subsequently chosen and performed and the money placed on the other measurements is returned to the agent. We show how the rules of rational betting imply all the interesting features of quantum probability, even in such (...)
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  8.  11
    Betting on the outcomes of measurements: a Bayesian theory of quantum probability.Itamar Pitowsky - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 34 (3):395-414.
    We develop a systematic approach to quantum probability as a theory of rational betting in quantum gambles. In these games of chance the agent is betting in advance on the outcomes of several incompatible measurements. One of the measurements is subsequently chosen and performed and the money placed on the other measurements is returned to the agent. We show how the rules of rational betting imply all the interesting features of quantum probability, even in such finite gambles. (...)
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  9. Betting against the Zen Monk: on preferences and partial belief.Edward Elliott - 2019 - Synthese 198 (4):3733-3758.
    According to the preference-centric approach to understanding partial belief, the connection between partial beliefs and preferences is key to understanding what partial beliefs are and how they’re measured. As Ramsey put it, the ‘degree of a belief is a causal property of it, which we can express vaguely as the extent to which we are prepared to act on it’ The Foundations of Mathematics and Other Logical Essays, Routledge, Oxon, pp 156–198, 1931). But this idea is not as popular as (...)
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  10.  14
    BET‐ting on Nrf2: How Nrf2 Signaling can Influence the Therapeutic Activities of BET Protein Inhibitors.Nirmalya Chatterjee & Dirk Bohmann - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (5):1800007.
  11.  46
    Coherent bets under partially resolving uncertainty and belief functions.Jean-Yves Jaffray - 1989 - Theory and Decision 26 (2):99-105.
  12. Bets on Hats: On Dutch Books Against Groups, Degrees of Belief as Betting Rates, and Group-Reflection.Luc Bovens & Wlodek Rabinowicz - 2011 - Episteme 8 (3):281-300.
    The Puzzle of the Hats is a puzzle in social epistemology. It describes a situation in which a group of rational agents with common priors and common goals seems vulnerable to a Dutch book if they are exposed to different information and make decisions independently. Situations in which this happens involve violations of what might be called the Group-Reflection Principle. As it turns out, the Dutch book is flawed. It is based on the betting interpretation of the subjective probabilities, (...)
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  13.  90
    Bet hedging or not? A guide to proper classification of microbial survival strategies.Imke G. de Jong, Patsy Haccou & Oscar P. Kuipers - 2011 - Bioessays 33 (3):215-223.
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  14.  13
    Betting & Hierarchy in Paleontology.Leonard Finkelman - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    At the turn of the last century, paleontologists wagered that they could find the missing link between lobe-finned fish and early terrestrial vertebrates. Given how these evolutionary relatives are distributed in the fossil record, Daeschler et al. predicted that some transitional form awaited discovery in late Devonian outcrops of the Canadian Arctic. It was there that they won their bet: the team soon found Tiktaalik roseae, a “fishopod” with a mix of aquatic and terrestrial traits. Tiktaalik’s discovery now stands as (...)
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  15.  23
    Betting on Future Physics.Mike D. Schneider - 2022 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 73 (1):161-183.
    The ‘cosmological constant problem’ has historically been understood as describing a conflict between cosmological observations in the framework of general relativity and theoretical predictions from quantum field theory, which a future theory of quantum gravity ought to resolve. I argue that this view of the CCP is best understood in terms of a bet about future physics made on the basis of particular interpretational choices in GR and QFT, respectively. Crucially, each of these choices must be taken as itself grounded (...)
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  16.  53
    Betting on Machina’s reflection example: an experiment on ambiguity. [REVIEW]Olivier L’Haridon & Lætitia Placido - 2010 - Theory and Decision 69 (3):375-393.
    In a recent article, Machina (Am Econ Rev forthcoming, 2008) suggested choice problems in the spirit of Ellsberg (Q J Econ 75:643–669, 1961), which challenge tail-separability, an implication of Choquet expected utility (CEU), to a similar extent as the Ellsberg paradox challenged the sure-thing principle implied by subjective expected utility (SEU). We have tested choice behavior for bets on one of Machina’s choice problems, the reflection example. Our results indicate that tail-separability is violated by a large majority of subjects (over (...)
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  17.  3
    ‘I Bet They Are Going to Read It’: Reported Direct Speech in Titles of Research Papers in Linguistic Pragmatics.Hanna Pułaczewska - 2009 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 5 (2):271-291.
    ‘I Bet They Are Going to Read It’: Reported Direct Speech in Titles of Research Papers in Linguistic Pragmatics Titles of research articles in the humanities, including linguistics, tend to be more creative and less informative than corresponding titles in exact sciences or medicine. In linguistics, pragmatic studies are an area where reported discourse, i.e. direct speech in the form of a full speech act, occurs relatively frequently in titles of research papers. This paper analyses the metonymic and cataphoric relations (...)
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  18. You Bet Your Life: Pascal’s Wager Defended.William G. Lycan & George N. Schlesinger - 1988 - In Joel Feinberg (ed.), Reason and Responsibility. Wadsworth.
  19.  10
    Betting on Life.Jason Burke Murphy - 2010 - The Monist 93 (1):135-140.
    This paper works with Pascal's Wager with "life has meaning" replacing "God exists" as the proposition that we "bet on". This change shows that we should choose to believe that life is meaningful. This argument does not fall prey to the "many gods" objection. People looking for what makes makes life meaningful do not get many clues from this argument which only justifies the search for meaning.
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  20.  99
    I bet you'll solve Goodman's Riddle.Wolfgang Freitag - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (259):254-267.
  21.  34
    Betting Interpretation and the Problem of Interference.Wlodek Rabinowicz & Lina Eriksson - 2014 - Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 17:103-115.
    It has long been common to identify an agent’s degrees of belief with her betting rates. Here is this betting interpretation in a nutshell: A bet on a proposition A with price C and a non-zero stake S is said to be fair for an agent iff the latter is willing to take each side of the bet, to buy the bet as to sell it. Assuming that such a bet on A exists and that the C/S ratio (...)
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  22. Do bets reveal beliefs?Jean Baccelli - 2017 - Synthese 194 (9):3393-3419.
    This paper examines the preference-based approach to the identification of beliefs. It focuses on the main problem to which this approach is exposed, namely that of state-dependent utility. First, the problem is illustrated in full detail. Four types of state-dependent utility issues are distinguished. Second, a comprehensive strategy for identifying beliefs under state-dependent utility is presented and discussed. For the problem to be solved following this strategy, however, preferences need to extend beyond choices. We claim that this a necessary feature (...)
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  23. Betting against Pascal's Wager.Gregory Mougin & Elliott Sober - 1994 - Noûs 28 (3):382-395.
    Only one traditional objection to Pascal's wager is telling: Pascal assumes a particular theology, but without justification. We produce two new objections that go deeper. We show that even if Pascal's theology is assumed to be probable, Pascal's argument does not go through. In addition, we describe a wager that Pascal never considered, which leads away from Pascal's conclusion. We then consider the impact of these considerations on other prudential arguments concerning what one should believe, and on the more general (...)
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  24.  37
    Knowing, betting and cohering.Jonathan E. Adler - 1986 - Philosophical Topics 14 (1):243-257.
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  25.  54
    Bet Accepted: A Reply to Freitag.Christopher Dorst - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (270):175-183.
    Wolfgang Freitag claims to have developed a proposal that solves Goodman's famous New Riddle of Induction. His proposal makes use of the notion of ‘derivative defeat’; the claim is that in certain circumstances, the projection of some predicates is derivatively defeated, i.e., it is inductively invalid. Freitag develops the proposal using some compelling examples, and then shows that it likewise applies to the argument at the basis of the New Riddle. There, he alleges, the projection of ‘grue’ is derivatively defeated, (...)
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  26. Betting against hard determinism.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (3):219-235.
    The perennial fear associated with the free will problem is the prospect of hard determinism being true. Unlike prevalent attempts to reject hard determinism by defending compatibilist analyses of freedom and responsibility, this article outlines a pragmatic argument to the effect that we are justified in betting that determinism is false even though we may retain the idea that free will and determinism are incompatible. The basic argument is that as long as we accept that libertarian free will is (...)
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  27.  1
    No-betting Pareto under ambiguity.Itzhak Gilboa & Larry Samuelson - 2021 - Theory and Decision 92 (3-4):625-645.
    It has been argued that Pareto-improving trade is not as compelling under uncertainty as it is under certainty. The former may involve agents with different beliefs, who might wish to execute trades that are no more than betting. In response, the concept of no-betting Pareto dominance was introduced, requiring that putative Pareto improvements must be rationalizable by some common probabilities, even though the participants’ beliefs may differ. In this paper, we argue that this definition might be too narrow (...)
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  28. Betting on famine: Why the world still goes hungry [Book Review].Howard Hodgens - 2014 - Australian Humanist, The 115:22.
    Hodgens, Howard Review of: Betting on famine: Why the world still goes hungry, by Jean Ziegler, The New Press $34.99.
     
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  29.  65
    Fair bets and inductive probabilities.John G. Kemeny - 1955 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (3):263-273.
  30.  2
    Betting blind: coping with uncertainty through redundancy.Makmiller Pedroso - 2022 - Synthese 200 (3):1-17.
    Multiple biological groups, such as ant colonies, appear to have a noteworthy inefficiency: they contain vast amounts of redundant members that are not strictly needed to maintain the group. Philosophers and biologists have proposed that such inefficiency is illusory because redundancy enhances the resilience of groups when living under harsh conditions. Still, this proposal is unsatisfactory in different respects. First, it is too vague to account for when redundancy is selectively advantageous. Furthermore, it overlooks cases in which redundancy fails to (...)
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  31. A New, Better BET: Rescuing and Revising Basic Emotion Theory.Michael David Kirchhoff, Daniel D. Hutto & Ian Robertson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:1-12.
    Basic Emotion Theory, or BET, has dominated the affective sciences for decades (Ekman, 1972, 1992, 1999; Ekman and Davidson, 1994; Griffiths, 2013; Scarantino and Griffiths, 2011). It has been highly influential, driving a number of empirical lines of research (e.g., in the context of facial expression detection, neuroimaging studies and evolutionary psychology). Nevertheless, BET has been criticized by philosophers, leading to calls for it to be jettisoned entirely (Colombetti, 2014; Hufendiek, 2016). This paper defuses those criticisms. In addition, it shows (...)
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  32. Betting your life: an argument against certain advance directives.C. J. Ryan - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (2):95-99.
    In the last decade the use of advance directives or living wills has become increasingly common. This paper is concerned with those advance directives in which the user opts for withdrawal of active treatment in a future situation where he or she is incompetent to consent to conservative management but where that incompetence is potentially reversible. This type of directive assumes that the individual is able accurately to determine the type of treatment he or she would have adopted had he (...)
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  33. Imprecise Probabilities and Unstable Betting Behaviour.Anna Mahtani - 2018 - Noûs 52 (1):69-87.
    Many have argued that a rational agent's attitude towards a proposition may be better represented by a probability range than by a single number. I show that in such cases an agent will have unstable betting behaviour, and so will behave in an unpredictable way. I use this point to argue against a range of responses to the ‘two bets’ argument for sharp probabilities.
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  34.  16
    Bets and beliefs.Henry E. Kyburg - 1968 - American Philosophical Quarterly 5 (1):54-63.
  35.  56
    Betting Against Compatibilism.Göran Duus-Otterström - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (4):383-396.
    Some argue that libertarianism represents the riskier incompatibilist view when it comes to the free will problem. An ethically cautious incompatibilist should bet that we are not free in the sense required for moral responsibility, these theorists claim, as doing so means that we no longer run the risk of holding the morally innocent responsible. In this paper, I show that the same reasoning also advises us to bet against compatibilism. Supposing that we are unsure about whether or not the (...)
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  36.  18
    Sports Betting, Horse Racing and Nanobiosensors – An Ethical Evaluation.Robert Evans & Michael McNamee - 2020 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (2):208-226.
    Horse racing has begun to enter an economic decline in many countries, notably represented by a decline in revenues in betting volumes. A number of reasons may be attributed to this: the success of...
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  37.  44
    Bets and Boundaries: Assigning Probabilities to Imprecisely Specified Events.Peter Milne - 2008 - Studia Logica 90 (3):425-453.
    Uncertainty and vagueness/imprecision are not the same: one can be certain about events described using vague predicates and about imprecisely specified events, just as one can be uncertain about precisely specified events. Exactly because of this, a question arises about how one ought to assign probabilities to imprecisely specified events in the case when no possible available evidence will eradicate the imprecision (because, say, of the limits of accuracy of a measuring device). Modelling imprecision by rough sets over an approximation (...)
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  38.  9
    Betting on Quantum Objects.Jer Steeger - unknown
    Dutch book arguments have been applied to beliefs about the outcomes of measurements of quantum systems, but not to beliefs about quantum objects prior to measurement. In this paper, we prove a quantum version of the probabilists' Dutch book theorem that applies to both sorts of beliefs: roughly, if ideal beliefs are given by vector states, all and only Born-rule probabilities avoid Dutch books. This theorem and associated results have implications for operational and realist interpretations of the logic of a (...)
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  39.  92
    Betting on Life: A Pascalian Argument for Seeking to Discover Meaning.Jason Burke Murphy - 2010 - The Monist 93 (1):136-141.
    I seek to step back from the discussion of what it is that confers meaning and concentrate rather on the issue of our reasons to search for meaning. I seek to show that we always have reason to search for meaning, and that this is the case even if we are in a crisis that has rendered us ignorant of what it is that could make the rest of our life worthwhile. Consider: even if presented with an argument that has (...)
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  40.  28
    Betting on Ressentiment: Žižek with Nietzsche.Zahi Zalloua - 2012 - Symploke 20 (1-2):53-63.
  41. Sefer Bet Yaʻaḳov: Mah She-Tserikhah la-Daʻat Ha-Em Ṿeha-Bat Be-Yiśraʼel.Yaʻaḳov Yiśraʼ Lugasi & el - 2004 - Merkaz Medaʻ Yahadut.
     
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  42. Sefer Bet Midot.Judah Loeb Margolioth - 2003 - Yitsḥaḳ MeʼIr Zilberberg.
     
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  43. A betting interpretation for probabilities and Dempster-Shafer degrees of belief.Glenn Shafer - 2010 - International Journal of Approximate Reasoning.
  44. Sefer Bet Eloḳim.Moses ben Joseph Trani - 2005 - Avshalom Gershi.
    Shaʻar ha-tefilah -- Shaʻar ha-teshuvah.
     
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  45.  9
    Metaphysical bets.R. A. Sharpe - 1990 - Cogito 4 (2):133-133.
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  46.  54
    Betting on borderline cases.Richard Dietz - 2008 - Philosophical Perspectives 22 (1):47-88.
  47.  11
    Bets and Challenges in Translating Poetry.Carmen Andrei - 2022 - Episteme 27:105-126.
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  48. Bet Ḳelm: Mishnah sedurah ṿa-ʻarukhah, divre ḥokhmah u-musar be-ʻinyene emunah u-midot.Simḥah Zissel ben Israel Broida - unknown - Bene Beraḳ: "Śifte ḥakhamim", Ṿaʻad le-hafatsat Torah u-musar.
    -- 2. Emunah. Midot -- 3. Ḳinyene Torah -- ḥeleḳ 4. Tefilah, musar, Shabat, moʻadim --.
     
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  49. A bet with Peacocke.R. G. Millikan - 1995 - In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Philosophy of Psychology: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell. pp. 285--292.
  50.  15
    Betting on Fuzzy and Many–valued Propositions.Peter Milne - unknown
    From Introduction: In a 1968 article, ‘Probability Measures of Fuzzy Events’, Lotfi Zadeh pro-posed accounts of absolute and conditional probability for fuzzy sets (Zadeh, 1968).
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