Results for 'early modern'

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  1. Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 87-102.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, (...)
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  2. The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume.Udo Thiel - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The Early Modern Subject explores the understanding of self-consciousness and personal identity--two fundamental features of human subjectivity--as it developed in early modern philosophy. Udo Thiel presents a critical evaluation of these features as they were conceived in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He explains the arguments of thinkers such as Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Wolff, and Hume, as well as their early critics, followers, and other philosophical contemporaries, and situates them within their historical contexts. Interest in (...)
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  3.  1
    Early Modern Cartesianisms: Dutch and French Constructions.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    There is a general sense that the philosophy of Descartes was a dominant force in early modern thought. Since the work in the nineteenth century of French historians of Cartesian philosophy, however, there has been no fully contextualized comparative examination of the various receptions of Descartes in different portions of early modern Europe. This study addresses the need for a more current understanding of these receptions by considering the different constructions of Descartes's thought that emerged in (...)
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  4.  47
    Including Early Modern Women Writers in Survey Courses: A Call to Action.Jessica Gordon-Roth & Nancy Kendrick - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):364-379.
    There are many reasons to include texts written by women in early modern philosophy courses. The most obvious one is accuracy: women helped to shape the philosophical landscape of the time. Thus, to craft a syllabus that wholly excludes women is to give students an inaccurate picture of the early modern period. Since it seems safe to assume that we all aim for accuracy, this should be reason enough to include women writers in our courses. This (...)
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  5. The Origins of Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (4):499-518.
    This paper argues that early modern experimental philosophy emerged as the dominant member of a pair of methods in natural philosophy, the speculative versus the experimental, and that this pairing derives from an overarching distinction between speculative and operative philosophy that can be ultimately traced back to Aristotle. The paper examines the traditional classification of natural philosophy as a speculative discipline from the Stagirite to the seventeenth century; medieval and early modern attempts to articulate a scientia (...)
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    Early Modern Women on Metaphysics.Emily Thomas (ed.) - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    The work of women philosophers in the early modern period has traditionally been overlooked, yet their writing on topics such as reality, time, mind and matter holds valuable lessons for our understanding of metaphysics and its history. This volume of new essays explores the work of nine key female figures: Bathsua Makin, Anna Maria van Schurman, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Damaris Cudworth Masham, Mary Astell, Catharine Trotter Cockburn, and Émilie Du Châtelet. Investigating issues from eternity (...)
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  7.  23
    Recovering Early Modern Women Writers.Jessica Gordon-Roth & Nancy Kendrick - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (3):268-285.
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    Early Modern Protestant Virtuosos and Scientists: Some Comments.Kaspar Greyerz - 2016 - Zygon 51 (3):698-717.
    The following essay is divided in three parts. First, while sharing in principle Harrison's hypothesis of an affinity between the sixteenth-century Reformation and early modern science, it questions the connection between the latter and the Weberian “disenchantment of the world.” Second, it suggests a broader group of possible actors than that envisaged by Harrison in referring to virtuoso collectors and their cabinets of curiosities who are rather marginalized in Harrison's narrative. And third, it highlights the physico-theology of the (...)
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  9. An Early Modern Scholastic Theory of Negative Entities: Thomas Compton Carleton on Lacks, Negations, and Privations.Brian Embry - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):22-45.
    Seventeenth century scholastics had a rich debate about the ontological status and nature of lacks, negations, and privations. Realists in this debate posit irreducible negative entities responsible for the non-existence of positive entities. One of the first scholastics to develop a realist position on negative entities was Thomas Compton Carleton. In this paper I explain Carleton's theory of negative entities, including what it is for something to be negative, how negative entities are individuated, whether they are abstract or concrete, and (...)
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  10. Early Modern Women on the Cosmological Argument: A Case Study in Feminist History of Philosophy.Marcy P. Lascano - 2019 - In Eileen O'Neill & Marcy P. Lascano (eds.), Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought. Springer, NM 87747, USA: pp. 23-47.
    This chapter discusses methodology in feminist history of philosophy and shows that women philosophers made interesting and original contributions to the debates concerning the cosmological argument. I set forth and examine the arguments of Mary Astell, Damaris Masham, Catherine Trotter Cockburn, Emilie Du Châtelet, and Mary Shepherd, and discuss their involvement with philosophical issues and debates surrounding the cosmological argument. I argue that their contributions are original, philosophically interesting, and result from participation in the ongoing debates and controversies about the (...)
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    Queer/Early/Modern.Carla Freccero - 2006 - Duke University Press.
    Prolepses: Queer/early/modern -- Always already queer (French) theory -- Undoing the histories of homosexuality -- Queer nation : early/modern France -- Queer spectrality.
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  12. The Contextualist Revolution in Early Modern Philosophy.Christia Mercer - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):529-548.
    while no one was looking, contextualism replaced rational reconstructionism as the dominant methodology among English-speaking early modern historians of philosophy. In this paper, I expose the contours of this silent revolution, show that rational reconstructionism is a thing of the past among early modern historians, and examine the current state of early modern scholarship.1 As the contextualist revolution has increasingly widened our perspective and revealed the period’s philosophical diversity, it has encouraged early modernists (...)
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  13.  16
    Early Modern French Thought: The Age of Suspicion.Michael Moriarty - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    This book deals with three major French thinkers of the seventeenth century, Descartes, Pascal, and Malebranche. It examines their influential critical accounts of the impact of the body and of social relationships on experience, and the need to correct this by reference to metaphysical or religious truth.
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  14.  2
    Early Modern Philosophers and the Renaissance Legacy.Gianni Paganini & Cecilia Muratori (eds.) - 2016 - Springer Verlag.
    When does Renaissance philosophy end, and Early Modern philosophy begin? Do Renaissance philosophers have something in common, which distinguishes them from Early Modern philosophers? And ultimately, what defines the modernity of the Early Modern period, and what role did the Renaissance play in shaping it? The answers to these questions are not just chronological. This book challenges traditional constructions of these periods, which partly reflect the prejudice that the Renaissance was a literary and artistic (...)
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  15.  25
    Revisiting the Early Modern Philosophical Canon.Lisa Shapiro - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (3):365-383.
    ABSTRACT:I reflect critically on the early modern philosophical canon in light of the entrenchment and homogeneity of the lineup of seven core figures: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. After distinguishing three elements of a philosophical canon—a causal story, a set of core philosophical questions, and a set of distinctively philosophical works—I argue that recent efforts contextualizing the history of philosophy within the history of science subtly shift the central philosophical questions and allow for a greater (...)
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  16.  56
    Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy.Eileen O'Neill - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):185-197.
  17.  41
    Early Modern Experimentation on Live Animals.Domenico Bertoloni Meli - 2013 - Journal of the History of Biology 46 (2):199-226.
    Starting from the works by Aselli on the milky veins and Harvey on the motion of the heart and the circulation of the blood, the practice of vivisection witnessed a resurgence in the early modern period. I discuss some of the most notable cases in the century spanning from Aselli’s work to the investigations of fluid pressure in plants and animals by Stephen Hales. Key figures in my study include Johannes Walaeus, Jean Pecquet, Marcello Malpighi, Reinier de Graaf, (...)
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  18. Early Modern Women Philosophers and the History of Philosophy.Eileen O'Neill - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):185-197.
  19.  91
    Early Modern Information Overload.Daniel Rosenberg - 2003 - Journal of the History of Ideas 64 (1):1-9.
  20.  13
    Priestcraft. Early Modern Variations on the Theme of Sacerdotal Imposture.James A. T. Lancaster & Andrew McKenzie-McHarg - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (1):1-6.
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  21.  4
    Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy.Peter Distelzweig, Evan Ragland & Benjamin Goldberg (eds.) - 2016 - Springer.
    This essay discusses the role of new mechanical devices put forward in the seventeenth century in anatomy and pathology, showing how several of those devices were promptly deployed in anatomical investigations. I also discuss the role of dead bodies as boundary objects between living bodies and machines, highlighting their problematic status in experimentation and vivisection.
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    Early Modern Natural Theologies.Scott Mandelbrote - 2013 - In J. H. Brooke, F. Watts & R. R. Manning (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Natural Theology. Oxford Up. pp. 75.
    This chapter discusses natural theology in the early modern period. It demonstrates that early modern natural theology was a contested arena, in which a number of different standpoints might be justified based on the history of classical or Christian thought; that those different positions reflected disagreements about how one should read the evidence of nature, and what weight one should give to the Bible and to reason as lights to guide one in doing; and that natural (...)
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    Varieties of Early Modern Materialism.Falk Wunderlich - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):797-813.
    ABSTRACTThis paper discusses how early modern materialism can be defined and delineated, before turning to a brief survey of the main philosophical resources early modern materialist theories draw on. Subsequently, I discuss competing overall narratives concerning early modern materialism, and conclude with a defence of the controversial view that material soul theories belong to materialism proper.
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  24.  59
    Two Early Modern Concepts of Mind: Reflecting Substance Vs. Thinking Substance.Emily Michael & Fred S. Michael - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):29-48.
  25. Truth and Truthmakers in Early Modern Scholasticism.Brian Embry - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (2):196-216.
    17th-century Iberian and Italian scholastics had a concept of a truthmaker [verificativum] similar to that found in contemporary metaphysical debates. I argue that the 17th-century notion of a truthmaker can be illuminated by a prevalent 17th-century theory of truth according to which the truth of a proposition is the mereological sum of that proposition and its intentional object. I explain this theory of truth and then spell out the account of truthmaking it entails.
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  26.  3
    Early Modern Mathematical Instruments.Jim Bennett - 2011 - Isis 102 (4):697-705.
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  27.  1
    Reconstructing Early Modern Artisanal Epistemologies and an “Undisciplined” Mode of Inquiry.Tianna Helena Uchacz - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):606-613.
  28.  34
    Mechanism and Materialism in Early Modern German Philosophy.Paola Rumore - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):917-939.
    ABSTRACTThe paper focuses on the gradual separation between materialism and mechanism in early modern German philosophy. In Germany the distinction between the two concepts, originally introduced by Leibniz, was definitively stated by Wolff who was the first to provide a definition of the new philosophical term Materialismus, and of the related philosophical sect. In the first part I describe the initial identification of mechanism and materialism in German philosophy between the last decades of the seventeenth century and 1720. (...)
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  29.  2
    Ideas of Liberty in Early Modern Europe: From Machiavelli to Milton.Hilary Gatti - 2015 - Princeton University Press.
    Europe's long sixteenth century—a period spanning the years roughly from the voyages of Columbus in the 1490s to the English Civil War in the 1640s—was an era of power struggles between avaricious and unscrupulous princes, inquisitions and torture chambers, and religious differences of ever more violent fervor. Ideas of Liberty in Early Modern Europe argues that this turbulent age also laid the conceptual foundations of our modern ideas about liberty, justice, and democracy. Hilary Gatti shows how these (...)
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  30. Causation in Early Modern Philosophy: Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony.Steven NADLER (ed.) - 1992 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Three general accounts of causation stand out in early modern philosophy: Cartesian interactionism, occasionalism, and Leibniz's preestablished harmony. The contributors to this volume examine these theories in their philosophical and historical context. They address them both as a means for answering specific questions regarding causal relations and in their relation to one another, in particular, comparing occasionalism and the preestablished harmony as responses to Descartes's metaphysics and physics and the Cartesian account of causation. Philosophers discussed include Descartes, Gassendi, (...)
     
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  31.  22
    Early Modern Intellectual Life: Humanism, Religion and Science in Seventeenth Century England.Barbara J. Shapiro - 1991 - History of Science 29 (1):45-71.
  32.  98
    Three Infinities in Early Modern Philosophy.Anat Schechtman - 2019 - Mind 128 (512):1117-1147.
    Many historical and philosophical studies treat infinity as an exclusively quantitative notion, whose proper domain of application is mathematics and physics. The main aim of this paper is to disentangle, by critically examining, three notions of infinity in the early modern period, and to argue that one—but only one—of them is quantitative. One of these non-quantitative notions concerns being or reality, while the other concerns a particular iterative property of an aggregate. These three notions will emerge through examination (...)
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  33.  83
    Philosophy of Experiment in Early Modern England: The Case of Bacon, Boyle and Hooke.Peter R. Anstey - 2014 - Early Science and Medicine 19 (2):103-132.
  34.  2
    Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics.Christia Mercer (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume showcases the best current work now being written on a wide range of issues in early modern philosophy, when some of the most influential current philosophical problems were first identified by figures like Locke, Berkeley, Kant, Spinoza, and Descartes. Collectively the articles exemplify the wide range of methodological perspectives currently being employed by top figures in the field. Indeed the selling point of the volume is the very high level of the fourteen contributors, each of whom (...)
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  35.  63
    The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy.Donald Rutherford (ed.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Early Modern Philosophy is a comprehensive introduction to the central topics and changing shape of philosophical inquiry in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It explores one of the most innovative periods in the history of Western philosophy, extending from Montaigne, Bacon and Descartes through Hume and Kant. During this period, philosophers initiated and responded to major intellectual developments in natural science, religion, and politics, transforming in the process concepts and doctrines inherited from ancient and (...)
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  36. The Invisible World: Early Modern Philosophy and the Invention of the Microscope.Catherine Wilson - 1995 - Princeton University Press.
  37.  58
    Hellenistic and Early Modern Philosophy.Jon Miller & Brad Inwood (eds.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    Early modern philosophers looked for inspiration to the later ancient thinkers when they rebelled against the dominant Platonic and Aristotelian traditions. The impact of the Hellenistic philosophers on such philosophers as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza and Locke was profound and is ripe for reassessment. This collection of essays offers precisely that. Leading historians of philosophy explore the connections between Hellenistic and early modern philosophy in ways that take advantage of new scholarly and philosophical advances. The essays display (...)
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  38. Introduction to "Teaching Early Modern Philosophy".Alberto Vanzo - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (3):321-325.
    The articles in the symposium “Teaching Early Modern Philosophy: New Approaches” provide theoretical reflections and practical advice on new ways of teaching undergraduate survey courses in early modern philosophy. This introduction lays out the rationale for the symposium and summarizes the articles that compose it.
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  39. Women on Liberty in Early Modern England.Jacqueline Broad - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (2):112-122.
    Our modern ideals about liberty were forged in the great political and philosophical debates of the 17th and 18th centuries, but we seldom hear about women's contributions to those debates. This paper examines the ideas of early modern English women – namely Margaret Cavendish, Mary Astell, Mary Overton, ‘Eugenia’, Sarah Chapone and the civil war women petitioners – with respect to the classic political concepts of negative, positive and republican liberty. The author suggests that these writers' woman-centred (...)
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  40.  10
    Editing Early Modern Scientific Correspondence: The Way ForwardAnna Marie Roos . The Correspondence of Dr. Martin Lister . Volume 1: 1662–1677. Xxiv + 942 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Leiden: Brill, 2015. $330 .Philip Beeley; Christoph J. Scriba . The Correspondence of John Wallis . Volume 4: 1672–April 1675. Lv + 595 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. $325. [REVIEW]Michael Hunter - 2016 - Isis 107 (2):365-372.
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  41.  20
    Voluntarist Theology and Early-Modern Science: The Matter of the Divine Power, Absolute and Ordained.Francis Oakley - 2018 - History of Science 56 (1):72-96.
    This paper is an intervention in the debate inaugurated by Peter Harrison in 2002 when he called into question the validity of what has come to be called ‘the voluntarism and early-modern science thesis’. Though it subsequently drew support from such historians of science as J. E. McGuire, Margaret Osler, and Betty-Joe Teeter Dobbs, the origins of the thesis are usually traced back to articles published in 1934 and 1961 respectively by the philosopher Michael Foster and the historian (...)
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  42.  3
    Absolute Time: Rifts in Early Modern British Metaphysics.Emily Thomas - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    What is time? This is one of the most fundamental questions we can ask. Emily Thomas explores how a new theory of time emerged in the seventeenth century. The 'absolute' theory of time held that it is independent of material bodies or human minds, so even if nothing else existed there would be time.
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  43.  60
    Early Modern Natural Law Theories: Contexts and Strategies in Early Enlightenment.T. J. Hochstrasser & Peter Schröder (eds.) - 2003 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    The study of natural law theories is presently one of the most fruitful areas of research in the studies of early modern intellectual history, and moral and political theory. Likewise the historical significance of the Enlightenment for the development of `modernisation' in many different forms continues to be the subject of controversy. This collection therefore offers a timely opportunity to re-examine both the coherence of the concept of an `early Enlightenment', and the specific contribution of natural law (...)
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  44.  2
    Causation in Early Modern Philosophy: Cartesianism, Occasionalism, and Preestablished Harmony.Steven NADLER (ed.) - 1989 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Three general accounts of causation stand out in early modern philosophy: Cartesian interactionism, occasionalism, and Leibniz's preestablished harmony. The contributors to this volume examine these theories in their philosophical and historical context. They address them both as a means for answering specific questions regarding causal relations and in their relation to one another, in particular, comparing occasionalism and the preestablished harmony as responses to Descartes's metaphysics and physics and the Cartesian account of causation. Philosophers discussed include Descartes, Gassendi, (...)
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  45.  16
    Modelling the History of Early Modern Natural Philosophy: The Fate of the Art-Nature Distinction in the Dutch Universities.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):46-74.
    ABSTRACTThe ‘model approach’ facilitates a quantitative-oriented study of conceptual changes in large corpora. This paper implements the ‘model approach’ to investigate the erosion of the traditional art-nature distinction in early modern natural philosophy. I argue that a condition for this transformation has to be located in the late scholastic conception of final causation. I design a conceptual model to capture the art-nature distinction and formulate a working hypothesis about its early modern fate. I test my hypothesis (...)
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  46.  11
    Introduction: Early Modern Color Worlds.Sachiko Kusukawa, Karin Leonhard, Tawrin Baker & Sven Dupré - 2015 - Early Science and Medicine 20 (4-6):289-307.
  47.  64
    Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy.Hannah Dawson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In a powerful and original contribution to the history of ideas, Hannah Dawson explores the intense preoccupation with language in early-modern philosophy, and presents a groundbreaking analysis of John Locke's critique of words. By examining a broad sweep of pedagogical and philosophical material from antiquity to the late seventeenth century, Dr Dawson explains why language caused anxiety in writers such as Montaigne, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Gassendi, Nicole, Pufendorf, Boyle, Malebranche and Locke. Locke, Language and Early-Modern Philosophy (...)
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  48.  7
    Ethics and Aesthetics in Early Modern South Asia: A Controversy Surrounding the Tenth Book of the Bhāgavata Purāṇa.Kiyokazu Okita - 2018 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 22 (1):25-43.
    Kṛṣṇa’s relationships with the Gopīs of Vraja, described in texts such as the Bhāgavata Purāṇa were controversial in the precolonial period. This paper first summarizes the teachings of Caitanya, the inaugurator of Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavism who promoted the Purāṇa. The paper then discusses Rūpa’s Ujjvala- nīlamaṇi where he promotes Kṛṣṇa’s paramourship in relation to the Gopīs. This is followed by an analysis of both Jīva’s view on Kṛṣṇa’s matrimony with the Gopīs and the refutation of Jīva’s view in the Svakīyātvanirāsavicāra written (...)
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  49. Eternity in Early Modern Philosophy.Yitzhak Melamed - 2016 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), Eternity: A History. Oxford University Press. pp. 129-167.
    Modernity seemed to be the autumn of eternity. The secularization of European culture provided little sustenance to the concept of eternity with its heavy theological baggage. Yet, our hero would not leave the stage without an outstanding performance of its power and temptation. Indeed, in the first three centuries of the modern period – the subject of the third chapter by Yitzhak Melamed - the concept of eternity will play a crucial role in the great philosophical systems of the (...)
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  50.  72
    Kant and the Early Moderns.Daniel Garber & Béatrice Longuenesse (eds.) - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    "This book is a very important contribution to the study of the history of modern philosophy.
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