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  1. Thomas Kingsmill Abbott (1864). Sight and Touch: An Attempt to Disprove the Received (or Berkeleian) Theory of Vision. Garland.
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  2. Diogenes Allen (1969). Tactile and Non-Tactile Awarenesses. Mind 78 (312):567-570.
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  3. Emmanuel Alloa (2015). Getting in Touch. Aristotelian Diagnostics. In Richard Kearney & Brian Treanor (eds.), Carnal Hermeneutics. Fordham 57-72.
  4. Sydney Alrutz (1898). On the Temperature-Senses. Mind 7 (25):141-144.
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  5. Sydney Alrutz (1897). On the Temperature-Senses. Mind 6 (23):445-448.
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  6. Mary Jean Amon & Luis H. Favela (2015). The Complex Experience of Touching Metallic, Damp, and Slimy Things. Theory and Psychology 25:543-545.
    The importance of touch to mammalian survival and well-being cannot be overstated. The capacity for action depends on the sense of touch, which is a necessary feature of an animal’s being-in-the-world (O’Shaughnessy, 1989, pp. 38–39). Interpersonal touch has been shown to be an important part of human welfare, including disease prevention and treatment (see Field, 2001 for review). Throughout a mammal’s lifespan, social relation- ships are also mediated by touch behavior (see Thayer, 1986 for review). Given these facts, the sense (...)
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  7. David Appelbaum (1988). The Interpenetrating Reality: Bringing The Body To Touch. Lang.
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  8. David Applebaum (1988). The Interpenetrating Reality Bringing the Body to Touch.
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  9. Alejandro Arango (2015). Moral Clumsiness. Think 14 (40):93-99.
    What would happen if one morning you wake up clumsy, as if your sense of touch were unreliable, arbitrarily on and off? And what would this clumsiness look like if we could transfer it to the moral sense? The article expounds an interesting analogy between the sense of touch, loosely construed, and the moral sense: just as a sort of consistency is necessary for the sense of touch to do its job, so it is for the moral sense to play (...)
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  10. David M. Armstrong (1963). Vesey on Sensations of Heat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (December):359-362.
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  11. Fred Attneave & Braddie Benson (1969). Spatial Coding of Tactual Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):216.
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  12. T. R. Austin & R. B. Sleight (1952). Accuracy of Tactual Discrimination of Letters, Numerals, and Geometric Forms. Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (3):239.
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  13. Herbert J. Bauer (1952). Discrimination of Tactual Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (6):455.
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  14. Robert Belton (2013). Please Touch: Dada and Surrealist Objects After the Readymade. By Janine Mileaf. The European Legacy 18 (1):92-94.
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  15. Ferdinand Binkofski, Kathrin Reetz & Annabelle Blangero (2007). Tactile Agnosia and Tactile Apraxia: Cross Talk Between the Action and Perception Streams in the Anterior Intraparietal Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):201-202.
    In the haptic domain, a double dissociation can be proposed on the basis of neurological deficits between tactile information for action, represented by tactile apraxia, and tactile information for perception, represented by tactile agnosia. We suggest that this dissociation comes from different networks, both involving the anterior intraparietal area of the posterior parietal cortex.
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  16. Kenneth C. Blanchard Jr (1996). Being, Seeing, and Touching. Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):577-607.
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  17. Ned Block (2003). Spatial Perception Via Tactile Sensation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.
    I’m now looking at a soccer ball and a Nintendo Game Cube, and thus am having a perceptual experience of a sphere and a cube. My friend, blind from birth, (who’s helping me with the cleaning) is touching these items, and is thus having a perceptual experience of the same things. Not only are we perceiving the same items, but in doing so we apply the terms ‘sphere’ and ‘cube’, respectively, to them. Are we, in doing so, applying the same, (...)
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  18. Ned Block (2003). Tactile Sensation Via Spatial Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.
  19. Abraham P. Bos (2010). The Soul's Instrument for Touching in Aristotle, on the Soul II 11, 422b34–423a21. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (1):89-102.
    From ancient times Aristotle, On the Soul II 11, 422b34ff. on the perception of touch has remained incomprehensible. We can only start to understand the text when we see that Aristotle, in talking about “the ensouled body” (423a13), means “the soul's instrumental body” and views this as the actual instrument for the perception of touch. The visible body is only an intermediary between the soul-body and the object of touch.
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  20. Józef Bremer (2011). Aristotle on Touch. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 16 (1):73-87.
    According Aristotle’s On the Soul, the fi rst and most important form of sensation which we human beings share with other animals is a sense of touch. Without touch animals cannot exist. The fi rst part of my article presents Aristotle’s teaching about the internal connection between the soul and the sensory powers, especially as regards the sense of touch. The second part consists of a collection of the classical considerations about this subject. The third part then deals with the (...)
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  21. Robert Eamon Briscoe (2016). Multisensory Processing and Perceptual Consciousness: Part I. Philosophy Compass 11 (2):121-133.
    Multisensory processing encompasses all of the various ways in which the presence of information in one sensory modality can adaptively influence the processing of information in a different modality. In Part I of this survey article, I begin by presenting a cartography of some of the more extensively investigated forms of multisensory processing, with a special focus on two distinct types of multisensory integration. I briefly discuss the conditions under which these different forms of multisensory processing occur as well as (...)
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  22. Margaret S. Brown & George M. Stratton (1925). The Spatial Threshold of Touch in Blind and in Seeing Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (6):434.
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  23. Tad T. Brunyé, Eliza K. Walters, Tali Ditman, Stephanie A. Gagnon, Caroline R. Mahoney & Holly A. Taylor (2012). The Fabric of Thought: Priming Tactile Properties During Reading Influences Direct Tactile Perception. Cognitive Science 36 (8):1449-1467.
    The present studies examined whether implied tactile properties during language comprehension influence subsequent direct tactile perception, and the specificity of any such effects. Participants read sentences that implicitly conveyed information regarding tactile properties (e.g., Grace tried on a pair of thick corduroy pants while shopping) that were either related or unrelated to fabrics and varied in implied texture (smooth, medium, rough). After reading each sentence, participants then performed an unrelated rating task during which they felt and rated the texture of (...)
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  24. Dan Cavedon-Taylor (forthcoming). Touching Voids: On the Varieties of Absence Perception. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-12.
    Seeing one’s laptop to be missing, hearing silence and smelling fresh air; these are all examples of perceptual experiences of absences. In this paper I discuss an example of absence perception in the tactual sense modality, that of tactually perceiving a tooth to be absent in one’s mouth, following its extraction. Various features of the example challenge two recently-developed theories of absence perception: Farennikova’s memory-perception mismatch theory and Martin and Dockic’s meta-cognitive theory. I speculate that the mechanism underlying the experience (...)
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  25. Sam Clarke (2016). Investigating What Felt Shapes Look Like. I-Perception 7 (1).
    A recent empirical study claims to show that the answer to Molyneux’s question is negative, but, as John Schwenkler points out, its findings are inconclusive: Subjects tested in this study probably lacked the visual acuity required for a fair assessment of the question. Schwenkler is undeterred. He argues that the study could be improved by lowering the visual demands placed on subjects, a suggestion later endorsed and developed by Kevin Connolly. I suggest that Connolly and Schwenkler both underestimate the difficulties (...)
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  26. Frédérique De Vignemont & Olivier Massin (forthcoming). Touch. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford University Press
    Since Aristotle, touch has been found especially hard to define. One of the few unchallenged intuition about touch, however, is that tactile awareness entertains some especially close relationship with bodily awareness. This article considers the relation between touch and bodily awareness from two different perspectives: the body template theory and the body map theory. According to the former, touch is defined by the fact that tactile content matches proprioceptive content. We raise some objections against such a bodily definition of touch (...)
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  27. Dr Edmund Montgomery (1885). III. —Space and Touch, I. Mind (38):227-244.
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  28. Dr Edmund Montgomery (1885). III. —Space and Touch, I. Mind (38):227-244.
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  29. Martin Eimer, Angelo Maravita, Jose Van Velzen, Masud Husain & Jon Driver (2002). The Electrophysiology of Tactile Extinction: ERP Correlates of Unconscious Somatosensory Processing. Neuropsychologia 40 (13):2438-2447.
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  30. Shepherd Ivory Franz (1916). The Constant Error of Touch Localization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 1 (2):83.
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  31. Matthew Fulkerson (2014). The First Sense: A Philosophical Study of Human Touch. MIT Press.
    It is through touch that we are able to interact directly with the world; it is our primary conduit of both pleasure and pain. Touch may be our most immediate and powerful sense—“the first sense" because of the central role it plays in experience. In this book, Matthew Fulkerson proposes that human touch, despite its functional diversity, is a single, unified sensory modality. Fulkerson offers a philosophical account of touch, reflecting the interests, methods, and approach that define contemporary philosophy; but (...)
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  32. Matthew Fulkerson (2012). Touch Without Touching. Philosophers' Imprint 12 (5).
    In this paper, I argue that in touch, as in vision and audition, we can and often do perceive objects and properties even when we are not in direct or even apparent bodily contact with them. Unlike those senses, however, touch experiences require a special kind of mutually interactive connection between our sensory surfaces and the objects of our experience. I call this constraint the Connection Principle. This view has implications for the proper understanding of touch, and perceptual reference generally. (...)
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  33. Matthew Fulkerson (2011). The Unity of Haptic Touch. Philosophical Psychology 24 (4):493 - 516.
    Haptic touch is an inherently active and exploratory form of perception, involving both coordinated movements and an array of distinct sensory receptors in the skin. For this reason, some have claimed that haptic touch is not a single sense, but rather a multisensory collection of distinct sensory systems. Though this claim is often made, it relies on what I regard as a confused conception of multisensory interaction. In its place, I develop a nuanced hierarchy of multisensory involvement. According to this (...)
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  34. M. Gabriel & T. S. Ball (1970). Plethysmographic and GSR Responses to Single Versus Double-Simultaneous Novel Tactile Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):368.
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  35. Alberto Gallace & Charles Spence (2010). Touch and the Body. Psyche 16 (1):30-67.
    This review addresses the role of early sensory areas in the awareness of tactile information in humans. The results of recent studies dealing with this important topic are critically discussed: In particular, we report on evidence from neuropsychology, neurophysiology, neuroimaging, and behavioral experiments that have highlighted the crucial role played by the primary somatosensory cortex in mediating our awareness of tactile information. Phenomena, such as tactile hallucinations, tactile illusions, the perception of supernumerary limbs, and synaesthesia are also discussed. The research (...)
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  36. Edouard Gentaz, Yvette Hatwell & Arlette Streri (2001). Constructivist and Ecological Approaches in Tactual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):106-106.
    Constructivist and ecological approaches are also observed in tactile perception studies. The question is whether identification and localization are dissociated in the tactile modality as well, and whether Norman's conception may be generalized to the field of touch. An analogue to blindsight was evidenced in passive touch, but no such dissociation was observed in active touch. A study is in progress in this domain.
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  37. Edouard Gentaz & Yves Rossetti (1999). Is Haptic Perception Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):378-379.
    A further step in Pylyshyn's discontinuity thesis is to examine the penetrability of haptic (tactual-kinesthetic) perception. The study of the perception of orientation and the “oblique effect” (lower performance in oblique orientations than in vertical–horizontal orientations) in the visual and haptic modalities allows this question to be discussed. We suggest that part of the visual process generating the visual oblique effect is cognitively impenetrable, whereas all haptic processes generating the haptic oblique effect are cognitively penetrable.
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  38. Rebecca Steiner Goldner (2011). Touch and Flesh in Aristotle's de Anima. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):435-446.
    In this paper, I argue for the sense of touch as primary in Aristotle’s account of sensation. Touch, as the identifying and inaugurating distinction of sensate beings, is both of utmost importance to Aristotle as well as highly aporetic on his explanation. The issue of touch and the problematic of flesh, in particular, bring us to Merleau-Ponty’s account of flesh as the chiasmic fold and overlap of subject and object, of self and other, and to an incipient and veiled knowledge (...)
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  39. Richard Gray (2013). What Do Our Experiences of Heat and Cold Represent? Philosophical Studies 166 (1):131-151.
    Our experiences of heat and cold are usually thought to represent states of things: their hotness and coldness. I propose a novel account according to which their contents are not states of things but processes, more specifically, the opposite processes of thermal energy being transmitted to and from the body, respectively. I call this account the Heat Exchange Model of heat perception. Having set out the evidence in support of the proposal, I conclude by showing how it provides a new (...)
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  40. Justin A. Harris, Lisa Karlov & Colin W. G. Clifford (2006). Localization of Tactile Stimuli Depends on Conscious Detection. Journal of Neuroscience 26 (3):948-952.
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  41. Bruce Hood (1994). Seeing, Reaching, Touching: The Relations Between Vision and Touch in Infancy. Mind and Language 9 (3):373-376.
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  42. Robert Hopkins (2011). Re-Imagining, Re-Viewing and Re-Touching. In Fiona McPherson (ed.), The senses: classic and contemporary philosophical perspectives. Oxford University Press, Usa 261.
    One strategy for working out how to individuate the senses is to pursue that task in tandem with that of individuating the sensory imaginings. We can tackle both, at least for the spatial senses of sight and touch, if we appeal to the idea that, while both modes represent their objects perspectivally, different forms of perspective are involved in each. This cannot, however, exhaust the differences between tactual and visual. Tactual experience is tied to bodily awareness as visual is not. (...)
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  43. Robert Hopkins (2004). Painting, Sculpture, Sight, and Touch. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):149-166.
    I raise two questions that bear on the aesthetics of painting and sculpture. First, painting involves perspective, in the sense that everything represented in a painting is represented from a point, or points, within represented space; is sculpture also perspectival? Second, painting is specially linked to vision; is sculpture linked in this way either to vision or to touch? To clarify the link between painting and vision, I describe the perspectival structure of vision. Since this is the same structure we (...)
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  44. Robert Hopkins (2000). Touching Pictures. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):149-167.
    Congenitally blind people can make and understand ‘tactile pictures’ – representations form of raised ridges on flat surfaces. If made visible, these representations can serve as pictures for the sighted. Does it follow that we should take at face value the idea that they are pictures made for touch? I explore this question, and the related issue of the aesthetics of ‘tactile pictures’ by considering the role in both depiction and pictorial aesthetics of experience, and by asking how far the (...)
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  45. George Hurley & Michael L. Kamil (1976). Confusions in Memory for Tactile Presentations of Letters. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (2):76-78.
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  46. C. Korsmeyer (2012). Touch and the Experience of the Genuine. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):365-377.
    Genuineness is an important property of objects that are rare, old, or preserved as memorials. Being genuine enhances economic value for objects such as works of art, and it is obviously critical for historical purposes, such as assessing the artefacts from a past culture. Here I argue that genuineness is also an aesthetic property that delivers an experience of its own. I contend that the sense of touch covertly operates in such experiences, as this sense conveys the impression of being (...)
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  47. Jack M. Loomis (1985). Tactile Recognition of Raised Characters: A Parametric Study. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (1):18-20.
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  48. Dominic M. M. Lopes (1997). Art Media and the Sense Modalities: Tactile Pictures. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):425-440.
    It is widely assumed that the art media can be individuated with reference to the sense modalities. Different art media are perceived by means of different sense modalities, and this tells us what properties of each medium are aesthetically relevant. The case of pictures appears to fit this principle well, for pictures are deemed purely and paradigmatically visual representations. However, recent psychological studies show that congenitally and early blind people have the ability to interpret and make raised‐line drawings through touch. (...)
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  49. Dominic M. McIver Lopes (2002). Vision, Touch, and the Value of Pictures. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):191-201.
    Since blind people can draw and interpret raised-line drawings, depiction is not an essentially visual medium. Neither is the art of pictures an essentially visual art form. The reasons given for evaluating a picture aesthetically may advert to its tactile qualities insteadof its visual qualities.In particular, a raised-line picture canbe valued for the tactile experience it elicits of the scene it depicts, just as a visual picture is sometimes valuedfor eliciting a visual experience of its subject. The argument for this (...)
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  50. Colin Marshall (2015). Hume Versus the Vulgar on Resistance, Nisus, and the Impression of Power. Philosophical Studies 172 (2):305-319.
    In the first Enquiry, Hume takes the experience of exerting force against a solid body to be a key ingredient of the vulgar idea of power, so that the vulgar take that experience to provide us with an impression of power. Hume provides two arguments against the vulgar on this point: the first concerning our other applications of the idea of power and the second concerning whether that experience yields certainty about distinct events. I argue that, even if we accept (...)
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